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November 24, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IMPORTANT!"
EVERY PAINT STORE SELLS PAINT
WE FEATURE:
- CANDLE MAKING SUPPLIES
* ART SUPPLIES
" PICTURE FRAMING SUPPLIES
COME ON OUT AND GET ACQUAINTED
DELF PAINT STORE

page three

Z t1 P

Sirtligan

Batty

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, November 24, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

2381 W. STADIUM BLVD. (near Jackson)

662-6690

BRING THIS VALUABLE COUPON WITH YOU!
This Coupon Good for 10% OFF on
any item at Delf Point Store.
! Expires December 31, 1970
' ....... ........ ........ ....s ... .....w .sU U

i

[1

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

a lad

n ews brief
THE SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS committee approved
yesterday the 21-year-old Genocide Convention making it an
international crime to take actions aimed at destroying entire
national, ethnic, racial, or religious groups.
It did so with four understandings that would, among other
things, make clear that an individual nation retains the right to
try its nationals for acts committed outside its boundaries.
This would include charges that U.S. troops murdered Viet-
namese civilians, which have led to trials such as that currently
in progress of Lt. William L. Calley Jr. for the alleged My Lai
massacre.
INDIANA AND NEBRASKA may be denied federal welfare
funds for violating government regulations, the Department of
Health Education and Welfare said Sunday.
In jeopardy is $23.3 million in funds to Indiana and $8.2 mil-
lion to Nebraska.
Examiners have found that Indiana has failed to make living-
cost adjustments and allow payment to persons other than family
members who care for welfare children.
Irf Nebraska, the examiner ruled the state had failed to make the
cost of living adjustment and failed to continue payments for chil-
dren after a stepfather enters the home.
TWO PERSONS were ejected from a federal courtroom
yesterday in the first day of the Seattle "7" conspiracy trial.
Judge George Boldt told U.S. marshals to remove two spectators
who he said were laughing during the trial of seven persons charged
witht the conspiring to damage the federal courthouse and federal
office building during a Feb. 17 dsmonstration in Seattle.
A QUEBEC LIBERATION FRONT member who was to be
questioned about the kidnapping of British diplomat James Cross
was found hung in a cell in a London police station yesterday,
Scotland Yard reported.
He was identified as Richard Pierre Bross, a French-born resi-
dent of Quebec who had lately been living in a London suburb.
A police spokesman said inquiries in Paris and Quebec had es-
tablished that Bross was a member of the FLQ. He added that during
questioning police hoped to find a new lead in/the kidnaping of Cross,
the British trade official who was seized in Quebec seven weeks ago.
* TO HELP CURB INFLATION, the Committee for Economic
Development (CED) called yesterday for a return to voluntary
wage and price guideposts, an approach which President Nixon
and his economic advisers have rejected.
The CED report held that both labor and management could be
influenced to greater restraint "once they clearly understand that this
will avoid a continuing wage-price spiral from which neither would
gain."
The report coincided with official hints that the administra-
tion will press an expansionist program of increased money supply,
easy credit and stimulative spending, while relying on general ap-
peals to management and labor to avoid a fresh upsurge of inflation.

Nixon's
campaign
stands
WASHINGTONR) - The
S e n a t e sustained President
Nixon's veto of a bill to limit
campaign spending for radio
and television broadcasts yes-
terday, after a Republican
leader called t h e measure a
step backwards in the quest
for broad political reform.
The roll call vote was 58 in favor
of overriding the President, 34
against, a margin of 4 votes short
of the necessary two-thirds.
Nine Republicans joined 49
Democrats in voting to override
but six Democrats joined 28 Re-
publicans in making the veto bind-
ing. Since the Senate has sus-
tained the President there is no
need for the House to vote.
The bill would have limited
spending on campaign radio and
television broadcasts to seven cents
for each vote cast for the office
involved in the previous election,
or $20,000, whichever is higher.
It would cover candidates for
president, vice-president, Senate,
House; governor, and lieutenant
governor.
Under terms of the bill, each
party would have been limited to
about $5.1 million worth of broad-
casting time in the 1972 presiden-
tial election campaign.
In vetoing the bill on Oct. 12,
Nixon said it discriminates against
broadcasters, favors incumbent
officeholders, and threatens free-
dom of political discussion.
Sen. John Pastore (D-RI), chief
sponsor of the broadcast limit
measure, said in advance that to
sustain the veto would deal a
probably fatal setback to reform.
Republican Leader Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania pledged an effort
at comprehensive campaign re-
form next year, and Nixon said
the administration would work
with him.
But Pastore said the President
and the Republicans said nothing
about that when the bill was being
drafted-or vetoed.

-Associated Press
Gift-wrapped heroin
A U.S. Customs officer spreads out more than 93 pounds of heroin, some in Christmas wrappings,
seized earlier this year and estimated to have a street value of $10 to $10 million. Three men from
Paraguay and one from Paris were indicted today in the case by a grand jury in the Southern Dis-
trict of New York.
SUPREME COURT RULING:
Legal tacitic held constitutional

615 6.0. fIMARsbr-
66235903

"'JOE' is not merely an extraordinary film; it is a
small artistic miracle. Only rarely in the turmoil of
human events does a work of such brutal directness
to the core truths of the conditions of life that no
matter what one's beliefs, there is no denying its
validity. 'JOE' is approached for sheer impact and
importance only by 'Z, PATHS OF GLORY,' and the
final scenes of 'EASY RIDER.' No one conceiving
this film, a year ago, could have known how loudly
it would speak today. It is a one-in-a-million."
-Harlan Ellison, L.A. Free Press
l r.
HELDI
OVE R
Sof course
. .........L

WASHINGTON (')-A man who
says he is really innocent but is
pleading guilty only because he
fears a jury might return a stiffer
sentence should be permitted to
do so, the Supreme Court held yes-
terday in a 6-3 ruling.
fhe Court also ruled on two ob-
scenity cases and upheld the rights
of District of Columbia tenants to
rent strike.
The first decision, in a North
Carolinaimurder case, found such
guilty pleas voluntary in a con-
stitutional sense and said they
preserve very human values by
allowing defendants to avoid a
death sentence or other grim al-
ternatives.
Most people who plead guilty
ly

BOUNDARY TREAT

Mexico, U.S. draw the line

admit also they are guilty, said
Justice Byron White for the ma-
jority. But even if they argue they
are innocent and are motivated by
only a desire to escape a tougher
sentence, continued White, trial
judges should accept their pleas.
The ruling swept aside as "an
exercise in arid logic" the conten-
tion of three dissenting justices
and of some federal and state
judges that these pleas are enter-
ed under duress and are therefore
invalid.
"The Constitution," said White,
"does not bar imposition of a
prison sentence upoon an accused
who is unwilling expressly to ad-
mit his guilt but who, faced with
grim alternatives, is willing to
waive his trial and accept the
sentence."
The decision indicates a hard-
ening stand by the court in crim-
inal cases. Significant, also, is that
Blackmun cast his vote along con-
servative lines.
' In two obscenity cases, mean-
while, the court rejected efforts
by California and Massachusetts,
to suppress films and magazines
in suggestive poses. But the voting
indicated here, too, that the court
is growing more conservative.
In the California case, a 4-4 af-
firmed a decision by the U.S. Cir-
The Michigan Daily,tedited and man-
a~ec, by students at the Universitv of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
Aity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mat
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

cuit Court in San Francisco that
a stag film of a woman feigning
self-induced sexual satisfaction is
protected by the constitution.
In the Massachusetts case a 5-3
vote rejected the state's appeal
from a decision by the U.S. circuit
court in Boston that no photo-
graph of the female anatomy is
obscene as long as sexual activity
is not depicted.
Tn other action the court:
-Let stand unanimously a rul-
ing that tenants in the District
of Columbia have a right to with-
hold rents if landlords failed to
keep their apartments in decent
condition.

Students seek changes
at. Computing Center

MEXICO CITY UP) - Mexico
and the United States signed a
treaty yesterday designed to
solve the old problem of just
where the United States ends
and Mexico begins.
Presidents Nixon and Gusta-
vo Diaz Ordaz have referred to
the treaty as one of the most
significant agreements between
their two governments in this
century.
The treaty, which still must
be approved by the Senate of
both nations, was worked out
after Nixon met with Diaz Or-
daz in Puerto Vallarta last Aug.
20. At that time, they agreed
in general terms to a solution
of boundary problems. These
problems, which go back almost
to colonial times, have led to

war, to invasion and, most of-
ten, to injured pride in Mexico
which made warm relations al-
most impossible.
The basic aim of the docu-
ment is to establish forever a
formula for determining just
where the boundary is, e v e n
though the rivers which form
most of it - the Rio Grande
and the Colorado - may shift
their courses.
Until now each shift in the
river bed - and there have been
many - led to a dispute over
what was Mexican and w h a t
was American. Each case had
to be dealt with individually and
negotiations sometimes t o o k
years. One small tract, where
the R i o Grande separates
Ojinaga, Mexico, from Presidio,

Tex., has been in dispute since
1904.
The countries have not been
able to agree on the name of
the riverawhich separates Texas
f r o m Mexico. In the United
States it is known as the Rio
Grande; in Mexico it is the Rio
Bravo.
The names stay that way un-
der the treaty, one name in the
English version and the other
in the Spanish, but the United
States cedes to Mexico 1,606 ac-
res along the river while Mex-
ico turns over 1,290 acres. The
treaty also determines the sov-
ereignty of several hundred tiny
islands and establishes that the
center of the river's main chan-
nel will always be the border.

By ANDY ZACK
The computer system' at t h e
University's computer center is
grossly inadequate according to
the students who use it. T h e y
maintain that the center is over-
crowded, that there is insufficient
seating and study space, and that
there is a need for more comput-
er counselors.
As a means of channeling stu-
dent feedback to those in charge
of operating the computer cen-
ter, the Computer Center User's'
Group (CCUG) has been formed.
The group hopes- to make the Uni-
versity's Computing Center a n d
its MTS computer system more
responsive to the needs of its us-
ers, according to Mark Barnett,
recording secretary of CCUG. .
The purpose of the group is to
s e r v e the interests of all MTS

computer users - students, pro-
grammers, instructors, and ad-
ministrators - by influencing the
policies and activities of the Uni-
versity Computing Center, s a y s
Barnett. "Often the naivehuser of
University computers at the com-
puting center has difficulty find-
ing out what he needs to know
about the computing center's fa-
cilities," he adds.
Membership is open to all com-
puter center users. CCUG mem-
bers discuss their problems and
experiences in working at the
computing center. They are ask-
ed to contribute their ideas on
group policy and such considera-
tions as the distribution of Uni-
versity' computer resources and
structured presentations of in-
formation regarding MTS c o m-
puter facilities.

! ! TUES.; WEO.--1, 9
COLOR A CANNON IBEASE J) 'FRI OOWNTOWN ANN Ammoft
LIUIINFORMATION 7011+070

1

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25th
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
PRESENTS
THE ONLY JEALOUSY OF EMIR
by W.B. YEATS, and
MISS JULIE
by AUGUST STRINDBERG
Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Building

CORRECTION
Due to an oversight, we neglect-
ed to mention the people re-
sponsible for the advertising in
Sunday's magazine. We regret
the error.
Craig Wolson-Retail Advertis-
ing Manager
Jim Storey-Sales and Promo-
tions Mgr.
Salesmen-Debbie Boros, Janie
Chow, Cheryl F a x, Joanne
Gierz, Bob Kirby, Stu Lockman,
Debbie Moore, Cheryl Rad-
cliffe, Rich RadclifferBonnie
Solowitch, George Strong, An-
drew Thorburn

I

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 5-6290

SALE
th. country sport suit
$73
...too good looking to be
reserved just for- weekends.
Rich all-wool fabrics styled
with back belt, two inverted

"ONE OF THE BEST
AMERICAN FILMS
OF THE YEAR I
-- News day

Promptly at 4:10 p.m.

Admission Free

Phoenix Eye View
of Revolution
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF REVOLUTION
Lyford P. Edwards
With a Foreword by Morris Janowitz
The repression of legitimate aspirations, sym-
bolic leadership, deprivation, and the partici-
pation of the upper class are among the
recurring features of revolutions discussed in
this study. First published in 1927, it uses evi-
dence from a variety of national and historical
settings. $2.25
HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
Jules Michelet
Edited and with an Introduction by
Gordon Wright

II

"THE FUNNIEST
MOVIE I'VE SEEN
THIS YEARI THIS
KIND OF MOVIE A
REVIEWER SHOULD
PAY TO SEE! JUST GO,
RUN, TO SEE IT!"
-New York Post

back pleats, flop button pockets,
flared trousers. Brown or block .:{:...
diagonal solids, blue donegal 9
tweed, olive herringbone.
1 2' ::::'> ...}f " 'f " ii :?y:'::-:

A historical work of literary excellence remark-
able for its vivid nortravRal of the nprsnnlities of the revnition "Ranks eneoi1

I

I .~ I

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