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October 31, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-31

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Soturday, October 31, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

4 Saturday, October 31, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"a- Sve

Wolverines

take

on

Badgers

on this and that
The Witches Brew . .
. .Football and the War
eric siegel
Today is Halloween, and there are ghosts haunting the
Wisconsin football team before its conference battle against
Michigan.
The Badgers haven't beat the Wolverines since the begin-
ning of the last decade, and only once in the last five years
have they been able to muster more than 14 points.
The last two outings between the two teams have been
particularly frustrating ones for the Badgers, who dropped both
contests by scores of 34-9 and 35-7 respectively. Two years ago.
it was Michigan halfback Ron Johnson who stole the show,
gaining 347 yards and scoring five touchdowns. Last year, Billy
Taylor, a Johnson successor starting only the second game of his
career, was the big man, blasting through for 142 yards in 15
carries and scoring a pair of touchdowns.
Now, Wisconsin rookie coach John Jardine must have
visions of a repeat performance flashing through his head,
as his 2-3-1 Badgers try to stop the undefeated, fifth-ranked
Wolverines.
Jardine has nothing but praise for the Wolverines, but he
isn't running scared. He says Michigan quarterback Don Moor-
head "handles the option better than anyone we've faced and
he has great passing protection, too." But he is counting on
junior quarterback Neil Graff, to spark the Badgers.
"They're too tough to run against, so we'll have to throw."
he said. One of the main reasons the Wolverines have been
tough to run against this year has been middle guard Henry
Hill and he for one discounts the notion that the team will let
up a little today after coming off three big wins against Purdue,
Michigan State and Minnesota..
"We're going to play the best football we know how, just
like we always do," Hill said. "We play football to win thats all.
Moorhead was equally emphatic about the non-possibility of
a letdown yesterday. "There won't be any letdown he said
simply.
"It's important that we win big," Moorhead added. "I'm
not saying we're going to try and run up a score, or anything
like that, but we have to keep improving and keep showing our-
selves we can get better."
Over the last three weeks, it should be noted, the Wolverines
have improved markedly. From a 29 point, 320 yard performance
against Purdue, the Wolverines went to a 39 point, 518 yard
performance against Minnesota. And the offense that couldn't
go anywhere at the beginning of the season has averaged 430
yards from scrimmage in its conference games this year.
Even if the Wolverines simply maintain the status quo,
spectre of the past two years is bound to come back and haunt
Jardine today.
But there will be more than just ghosts of past football
games hanging over Madison. For today is Homecoming and
in addition to some traditional ceremonies, various campus
and community groups-including the Madison Area Peace
Action Council (MAPAC) and the Inter-Fraternity Council
(IFC) have planned an anti-war homecoming in conjunction
with the national peace vigil.
The day's activities will include a massive march and leaf-
letting outside Camp Randall Stadium.
The theme of the traditional homecoming is victory: the
the theme of the anti-war vigil is withdrawal.
IFC president Gary McArten, who has been helping to or-
ganize today's activities, said yesterday that "some people may
think a traditional and an anti-war homecoming can't co exist,
but I don't see them as being that far apart.
"We want a decent, responsible march, one that will show
people that overwhelming numbers of students can participate
in responsible criticism of the war."
One activity that will not take place today is a moment of
silence and a brief anti-war message at the halftime ceremonies.
MAPAC has been asking Athletic Director Elroy Hirsch, a for-
mer Michigan man, for permission to have its 'own brief cere-
mony for weeks. For weeks Hirsch has been inaccessible, but
two days ago, other athletic department officials gave a flat
no to the request.
The reason cited was that "politics have no place at.a foot-
ball game."
But MAPAC spokesman Mary Ann Rice said, "It seems odd
that 70,000 people can come to a football game but have no
time to think about our soldiers who are dying in Vietnam every
day.
"I personally like football very much," she added, "and I
don't think it would take anything away from Homecoming to
conduct a memorial service. Far from it. It would undoubtedly
be one-of the best things that could happen to it."
In a peculiar visceral sort of way, you expect more than a
flat refusal on a question like this from a former Michigan man.

By JIM KEVRA
The Michigan Wolverines,
undefeated in six games so
far this year, will be trying
for their seventh straight
victory today as they take
on the Wisconsin Badgers in
Madison, Wisconsin.
The game should p r o v e
to be a test of the Mam-
moth Blue Wave's offense,
the most prolific point pro-
ducer in the Big Ten, versus
the stingy Badger defensive
unit.
Michigan's offense w h i c h
stuttered and stalled in its first
three outings has exploded for
15 touchdowns in its last three
contests, 13 of which were pro-
vided by the rushing attack.
Head coach Bo Schembechler,
it would seem, has finally found
the right comlination with Billy
Taylor at halfback, a position he,
likes, Glenn Doughty at wing-
back, Fritz Seyferth as t h e
crushing fullback and, of course,
Don Moorhead as the signal-
caller.
Schembechler expects the Bad-
gers to try to concentrate on
Taylor, Michigan's leading
ground gainer, but doesn't think
that will help. He commented,
"They'll try to stop Taylor, but
I don't think they'll be able to
key on him. There are t h r e e
other backs back there who can
run with the ball too."
John Jardine, in his first year
as coach of the Badgers agrees
that Wisconsin can't afford to
key on one player. "Michigan's
got four, men that can move
the ball," Jardine said. "Moor-
head's running is a real help."
The offensive line still re-
mains Michigan's biggest prob-
lem, not in ability but in depth.
The Wolverines only have one
healthy backup guard and one
backup tackle. Werner Hall, us-
ually a starting guard, has a
pinched nerve in his shoulder
and possibly could be pressed
into duty but Schembechler ad-
mits that he'd like to rest him.
The Badger defense has been

"SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS: BILL ALTERMAN and ELLIOT LEGOW

consistant so far this year hav-
ing held each opponent to be-
tween 12 and 24 points. Lead-
ing the rugged defense is ┬░mid-
dle linebacker Carl Winfrey who,
in last week's 30-12 victory over
Indiana, made 9 solo tackles and
recovered a fumble on the 4-
yard line. Jardine comments,
"He has a good sense of respon-
sibility. He reads fast; he has
good range."
Wisconsin sets up in a stand-
ard pro type 4-3-4 and doesn't
use a wolfback or monster man
as Michigan does. The defensive
line which averages 239 pounds
is composed of three seniors and
The Michigan-W i s c o n s i n
game begins at 2 p.m. and will
be carried over radio stations
WWJ, 950 AM; WPAG, 1050
AM; AM, 1600 AM; WUOM,
91.7 FM, and WCBN, 650 AM.,
a sophomore, but, unfortunately
for the Badgers, only Bill Gre-
gory, the left end, played his
position last year.
Along with Winfrey at the
linebacking slots are Gary Buss
and Dave Lokanc. Gary Buss,
whose brother Ron is the start-
ing strong safety, leads the Bad-
gers in tackles for losses while
Lornac is one of the leading
tackles on the team with 52.
The defensive backfield has
three starters returning from
last year's team with sophomore
Ron Buss the only newcomer. So
far this season, the defense has
picked off 13 errant aerials with
one of them being run back for
a touchdown. Wisconsin's de-

fense has also recovered eleven
fumbles.
The Badger defense has proven
itself to be tough. Penn State,
one of the most explosive teams
in the country, was held to '16
points by Wisconsin during the
Badgers 29-16 upset. Schem-
bechler admits being impress-
ed by them. "Their greatest
strength is their defense," he
said. "They haven't given up
more than 24 points this year.
Last year, we had trouble block-
ing them."
Up to now, the Badgers have
relied mostly upon their run-
ning game to move the ball but
Jardine plans to change his
strategy against Michigan.
"Michigan is such a physical
team," Jardinessaid, "that if
you stand up to them, they can
just blow you right out of there.
In order to win, we will really
have to move the ball in the
air."
Badger airpower is supplied by
Neil Graff, one of the most un-
derrated quarterbacks in the
Big Ten. Graff has completed 47
out of 104 passes this year and
has had only two intercepted.
On Graff, Schembechler com-
ments, "He had a good game
against us last year and he's im-
proved since then. He can come
up with the big play. He threw
three bombs against Penn State
and he's an excellent long pass-
er."
Wisconsin's rushing attack
relies more on speed than on
power. Alan "A-train" Thomp-
son, the fullback who was the
Badgers leading rusher last
year, ranks second this y e a r
behind sophomore sensation
Rufus "Roadrunner" Ferguson.
The Roadrunner, who stands all
of 5'-6" tall but weighs 186
pounds, hasathe speed to turn
the corners for long gainers.
Ferguson has Wisconsin's t w o
longest runs from scrimmage;
65 yards against Indiana and 47
yards against Northwestern.
Bullet rally
tops 76ers
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - Trailing by
14 points early in the third
quarter, the Baltimore Bullets
rallied for a 123-110 National
Basketball Association victory
last night over the Philadelphia
76ers behind the scoring of Earl
Monroe and Wes Unseld.
Philadelphia entered the final
period leading 88-85 before Bal-
timore surged ahead to stay with
94-93 on a basket by Fred Carter
with 8:43 left in the game.
The Bullets opened up a 100-
95 lead with 8:07 left and the
76ers never got closer than three
points as Unseld, Monroe, Car-
ter and Gus Johnson scored
timely points.
Suns set
BOSTON - The Boston Cel-
tics, sparked by veteran J o h n
Havlicek, shook off a late
challenge and pulled away to a
127-112 National Basketball As-
sociation victory over the Phoe-
nix Suns last night.
Havlicek scored 33 points in
leading the Celtics to their
fourth triumph in nine games.
The Suns pulled to within two
points, 114-112, on John Wet-
zel's jump shot with three min-
utes left, but the Celtics out-
scored Phoenix 13-0 the rest of
the way.

Michigan's defense which h a s
allowed an average of only nine
points per game have its hands
full with Wisconsin. In Graff,
the defensive backfield will be
facing a top flight passer who
loves to throw the bomb.
The linebackers will have the
pleasant duty of trying to cover
against the short pass, stopping
the power plays up the middle,
and getting outside to protect
against the sweep.
Schembechler emphasizes that
Michigan is playing one game at
a time and isn't looking ahead
to Ohio State. "I don't think
that's happening and I don't
think it will," he explained.
Jardine admits to being im-
pressed with the massive Mich-
igan juggernaut, and admits
that it won't be easy to win. In
fact, he calls the game "our
toughest game so far this year.
To win, Michigan has got to
make a lot of mistakes and
we've got to play our best game
of the year so far."

Michigan's balance : Above the defense,
below the offense

The Lineups

Offense

MICHIGAN

(30)
(71)
(65)
(53)
(60)
(72)
(85)
(27)
(42)
(32)
(22)

Paul Staroba (195)
Jack Harpring (220)
Reggie McKenzie (235)
Guy Murdock (210)
Tom Coyle (230)
Dan Dierdorf (246)
Paul Seymour (235)
Don Moorhead (195)
Bill Taylor (215)
Fritz Seyferth (205)
Glenn Doughty (195)

SE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
TE
QB
TB
FB
WB

(82)
(71)
(60)
(51)
(62)
(64)
(88)
(12)
(21)
(37)
(23)

WISCONSIN
Terry Whittaker (190)
Elbert Walker (300)
Dennis Stephenson (225)
Jim Fedenia (230)
Keith Nosbusch (235)
Roger Jaeger (225)
Larry Mialik (220)
Neil Graff (195)
Rufus Ferguson (185)
Alan Thompson (215)
Randy Marks (205)

I

r,

You Always
Have a Choice
of Merchandise
at
FOULLTTS
Spiral Note
Books
Fillers
Pencils Pens
Stationery
Lamps
Typewriters
Mich. Souvenirs
Records Art and
Engineering

1

Defense

I

i

(91)
(99)
(30)
(82)
(90)
(33)
(70)
(14)
(21)
(35)
(23)

Phil Seymour (215)
Tom Beckmen (240)
Henry Hill (220)
Pete Newell (225)
Mike Keller (215)
Mike Taylor (215)
Marty Huff (225)
Frank Gusich (190)
Bruce Elliott (170)
Tom Darden (190)
Jim Betts (185)

LE
LT
MG
RT
RE
LB
LB
RB
HB
HB
S

(76)
(79)
(35)
(73)
(77)
(54)
(57)
(25)
(19)
(24)
(46)

Bill Mayer (225)
Mike Mayer (225)
Carl Winfrey (225)
Jim DeLisle (240)
Ted Jefferson (220)
Gary Buss (215)
Dave Lokanc (220)
Danny Crooks (175)
Nathaniel Butler (170)
Neovia Greyer (195)
Ron Buss (190)

Supp.e-..

JIM BETTS (23) returns an interception in last week's game
against Minnesota. Betts went 45 yards with the football, just
missing going all the way.

WILDCATS FACE BUCKS

Unbeatens

battle

for

roses

}

By BILL ALTERMAN
Northwestern's, mighty Purple
People Eating Machine faces its
toughest test of the year today
when the undefeated (in confer-
ence play) Wildcats face a
sporadic but potentially ex-
plosive team from Ohio State.
Oddly enough both 'teams are
3-0 in conference play but sta-
tistically the Wildcats look un-
stoppable. In their three games
the Wildcat juggernaut has
amassed 110 points while giving
up a mere 28. The Buckeyes on
the other hand have only been
able to garner 105 points while
allowing the opposition 37.
In addition, Northwestern has
lost four in a row to the big bad
Buckeyes and they want re-
venge.
Despite their equal records,
Northwestern is a team on the
way up while the Buckeyes are
E diving down. In this weeks AP
poll the Wildcats scoared to
twentieth place while Woody
Hayes & Co. fell from first to

so they gave warning of the on-
slaught that was to follow.
In their opener against Notre
Dame the Wildcats succumbed
35-14. The following week UCLA
beat them 12-7 on a last minute
touchdown and in their third
contest Southern Methodist,
thanks to a missed Northwestern
extra point, emerged victorious
21-20.
But all this merely set the
stage for the REAL season and
in the Big Ten, the Wildcats
look like a power of the future.
Mike Adamle spearheads the
Wildcats powerful ground at-
tack. The 5-9 fullback this year

has amassed 646 yards on the
ground and another 120 on 12
pass receptions. In addition the
versatile performer has thrown
and completed 3 passes, one for
a touchdown.
Whenever Adamle gets tired
lugging the ball, junior quarter-
back Maurie Daigneau puts it
up in the air for one of his
covey of talented receivers. Last
week against Purdue.
Assuming the Buckeyes dare
take the field today, they will
start a team which just might
give Northwestern trouble.
After their ignominious loss
to Michigan last November, OSU

put it all together and this year
have, surprisingly enough, reel-
ed off 5 straight victories. Re-
cently, however, the Buckeyes
have been sputtering. After an
easy victory over Texas A&M
Woody's boys had to come from
.*hind to down a so-so Duke
eleven.
Finally, last week the Red and
White found themselves trail-
ing a fired up Illinois team 23-20
late in the third quarter. The
29 points they gave up was the
defense's worst showing since
the third game of the 1967 sea-
son.
Over in Lafayette today, Pur-
due will have its hands full
when it takes on the Illini. Il-
linois threw Ohio State all
Saround the field last week after
it was announced that its head
coach, Jim Valek, was being
fired.
Minnesota, after being thrash-
ed by Michigan, OSU, Missouri
and Nebraska, today will take
out their frustrations against an

PLAY GA MES'
WITH
YOUR MIND,
YOUR BODY,
YOUR FUTURE
LOOK FOR:
Byzantium, Body Talk, 20th Century Tarot
AT
FACTS and FUN
224 S. MAIN

p5:; ..m ....m ...

S

M!

ores
B A
leveland 110
naix 112
iladelphla 110j

N
Cincinnati 125, C
Boston 127, Phoex
Baltimore 123, Ph

Big Ten Standings

Pd. Political Adv.
PULL THE LEVER FOR LEN
For COUNTY COMMISSIONER-2nd Ward, Democrat
{,ERNEST L. QUENON
County government must no longer be left in the hands

Conference Games

All Games

MICHIGAN
Northwestern
Ohio State
Iowa

W
3
3
3
1

L
0
0
0
2

T
0
0
0
0

PF
112
110
105
27

PA
33
28
37
75

W
6
3
5
1

L
0
3
0
5

T
0
0
0
0

PF
153
151
195
51

of old-fashioned court house politicians.

With Len

by Ci,cnnn nn t he, bnllnit wehoe ne of those rare onnor-

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