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October 30, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridav.: Octohar -0 .197n

PageEigh THEMICHGAN AIL

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military research:

B

(Continued from Page 1)
journalism Prof. William Por-
ter. "The University should get
out of it with dignity as soon
as possible."
Porter says that, while it is
difficult to categorize research
as military or non-military,
secrecy is a clear criteria for the
University to judge whether to
accept projects. He argues clas-
sification prevents the free ex-
change of information.-
*"Research u n d e r classified
status doesn't comply with ad-
vancing knowledge, says SGC
member Bob Nelson, "It's cer-
tainly not as useful as research
open to the public."
'Researchers argue that the
a m o u n t of truly classified
knowledge is small. "What's of
interest to the scientific com-
munity is general principles,"
says associate Willow Run direc-
tor Richard Legault, "What's
classified is applications."
"If their research was for
peaceful purposes, it would not
be classified," argues De Grieck.
Knauss says that research
which is not available in teach-

ing or for publication has "little
value," but he opposes a ban on
classified research in general.
"My first choice would be to
have no classified research here;
it would be better if there's no
such thing," President Robben
Fleming says. "But I'm per-
suaded that in some cases one
can justify some degree of clas-
sification."
A The question of respon-
sibility for use or misuse of the
outcome of research is also in-
volved.
"I don't think you can say
knowledge is either good or bad
-I think there are good appli-
cations and bad applications,"
Vice President Norman argues.
Yet military researchers often
do not know how the Defense
Department does their work. "I
don't know what's done with
it," says Legault. "It's rare in-
deed we know the applications
of the technology developed
here."
"The University and the scien-
tists involved should realize that
they have a moral responsibil-
ity too," counters De Grieck.

Bursle Sallade
vie for state Senate

(Continued from Page 1
creased minority admissions. Dur-
ing the strike, Bursley criticized
the University for not stopping
class disruptions from occurring.
Referring to Burley's state-
ments, Sallade says, "At the
height of the crisis he advocated
stiffer policies in order to capture
the law and order to vote. If that
isn't violating constitutional auto-
nomy, I don't know what is."

IDespite B~rsley's comments on
the class strike, the senator says
he is in favor of less governmental
control over state universities.
"I voted against the state edu-
cation bill that would penalize
students by revoking their aid if
they participate in disruptions,"
he says. "The Legislature doesn't
have the competence to decide the
policies of a university adminis-
tration."

"They can't wash their hands
of what they develop."
Warner contends that individ-
uals have to be responsible for
the tools they create. "In times
of great danger from technology
and conflict you have great re-
sponsibilities," he explains.
Legault says that technology
and the Defense Department are
just means to an end and how
they are used depends to a large
degree on political leaders.
Attacking this type of ar-
gument, Bayer says, "The peo-
ple during the Nazi period in
German said 'The government
makes the decisions, We only give
them the means to carry it
out."
"The government can't make
these decisions if they don't
have the means to cary them
out," he explains.
Yet almost anything can be
accused of killing people or
helping the military. Hiatt
points out that trucks can be
used to carry grain or ammuni-
tion.
" If military researchers re-
fuse to continue their work, it
is said, the government will turn
elsewhere.
"If wa turn down contracts
we. would probably find the work
would get done anyway," says
Leonard Porcella, associate di-
rector of Willow Run. "If we're
the best people to do the job,
it would be better for us to do
it well rather than let someone
else do it less well."
Just because someone can do
something well, De Grieck points
out, does not mean that it
should necessarily be done.
Beyer says universities should
take the lead in educating so-
ciety by refusing war research.
0 If the University did stop
classified and military research,
it is argued, this would infringe
on the freedom of the research-
ers involved.
"Freedom goes both ways,"
says Hiatt. "There are a num-
ber of people who's movements
would be hampered if they were
not allowed in classified research
because their professional de-
velopment is in problems that
are classified."
"Their work violates the con-
ditions of our freedom by being
secret," Warner says.
Nelson says that if research-
ers insisted on doing military
research they could do so in a
non-university setting.
"The University should exer-
cise only the most minimal con-
trols and influences with what
people should do with their own
scholarly intent," contends law
Prof. Terrance Sandalow.
But Nelson points out that
"classification innately excludes
certain people from working on
research who don't fit govern-
ment criteria."
Beyer adds, , "Any society
makes rules restricting behavior.
In a free society you're free to
do as you like as long as you
don't impinge on the well-being
of others."
"If a person is working on
machines of destruction, he's
imperiling millions of people,"
he explains.
0 Another argument is that
refusing to take military re-
search would politicize the Uni-
versity and possibly alienate
from other segments of society.
"I strongly believe that the

Lessing
University should be apoli
says Porcello, adding tha
should not apply to indiv
within the University co
nity.
De Grieck counters th
allowing military research
the University is in fact t
sides and being political.
are not being neutral," h
sists.
0 Some say, that acc
funds for classified and m
research is necessary for
professional careers.
"Particularly in electricE
gineering most of the fr
work is for the Defense DE
ment," says Cooley Elect
Laboratory Director T h o
Butler. "We have to go

or curse?
tical," Nelson says, "The University
t this provides research overhead to
iduals these projects. If the University
mmu- can only devote so much money
to overhead, the University
at by should be more concerned about
now sodial problems.
taking "With only a limited amount
"They of resources, the military re-
ie in- searchers are keeping someone
else from doing something,"
epting Nelson adds.
ilitary After reviewing these argu-
their ments, University officials have
come to their own conclusions.
al en- "You can't say, unless you're
ontier prepared to give up science, that
epart- you won't accept anything with
ronics military applications," argues
m a s Fleming.
where Yet Fleming believes that

I

"It's not, the business of the University in
normal times to be involved in what is simply
and distinctly military research without civilian
applications," President Fleming says.
***********************s*****s****4"***:":*01 *i* *r.:.1r..: r. **". --

Benefit for ,'Kent State, Defense
Fund this Friday,'Oct. 30, 7 P.M
UGLI Multipurpose Room
The President of Kent State Student Gov't and others active in the
Defense for the Kent State 251will speak and show a student-made
documentary film about the May murders. SUPPORT THE KENT
25.

George Sallade

Current state economic policies
also divide the candidates. Both
take the traditional positions of
their respective parties. While
{ Bursley favors the Republican
policy of trying tohkeep spending
down to avoid tax increases and
inflation, Sallade says this pro-
gram has proven false.
"'You can cut down on unem-
ployment while controlling infla-
tion," he says. "The state can act
as a lobby in Washingtoni to en-
courage proper economic policies
as well as setting reasonable in-
terest rates within the state."
Sallade says an increase in state
taxes will be necessary to enact
the legislation he favors, adding,
"the people will pay for it when
you explain your program."
Sallade and Bursley have sim-
ilar backgrounds. Sallade is an
ex-Republican, having switched
parties about ten years ago. They
were members of the same frater-
nity while they attended the Uni-
versity. Both are from prominent
Ann Arbor families, and Bursleyf
Hall bears the senator's family1
name while Sallade's family owns
Wahr's a bookstore on South Uni-'
versity Ave.
While the campaign has been
less than hectic until recently,
Sallade seems to have been en-
couraged by the strength of other
Democrats to increase his efforts.
Filing for the race just before the
deadline, campaign workers, tra-
ditionally optimistic, say he has;
"almost a chance." Meanwhile,
Bursley has more campaign money
to spend in the final days than
Sallade and feels assured of vic-
tory.
"I probably don't even need a-
headquarters to be elected," he
says.

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the frontiers are."
Nelson argues that in many
fields funds are available for
research work from sources
other than the Defense Depart-
ment.
"We have to recognize that
there is an enthusiasm for cre-
ating and developing," Warner
comments. "The duty of the
engineers and scientists is to
harness that enthusiasm toward
different areas-they shouldn't
stop work.
0 Another defense of military
research is that University re-
searchers add a civilian com-
ponent to the Defense Depart-
ment.
"I think there is some really
important aspect of civilian con-
trol that is implied in this,"
Norman says. "The advisers of
the Defense Department on
many kinds of sophisticated
militarykdevelopment are civil-
ians and I don't want to see
decisions on those things purely
in military hands."
"The only education the mili-
tary has received is in terms of
how to make war more efficient-
ly." counters De Qrieck. "The
iesearchers don't educate the
Defense Department as to how
the research should be used-
more realistically they are serv-
ants of the military."
Warner says that while mili-
tary research adds a civilian
component to the Defense De-
partment, it also adds a military
component to civilian life here.
" Another question is the
cost which the University incurs
in pursuing military research.
"The agencies which finance
university research almost never
pay its full costs," said Lee Du-
Bridge, former U.S. science ad-
visor, in a speech here three
years ago.
In this year's University
budget, expenditures from the
general fund for research total
$7.4 million including $833,000
for University research admin-
istration and $817,000 for Willow
Run administration.
While the University does get
several million dollars back
from the federal government for
research costs,- Vice President
Norman confirms that the Uni-
versity subsidizes the research
effort as a whole.

~1

t

there Ahould be some restric-
tions on what University spon-
sored research should entail.
"It's not the business of the
University in normal times to
be involved in what is simply
and distinctly military research
without civilian applications,"
Fleming says.
He acknowledges, however,
that practically everything has
one civilian use or another, not-
ing that rifles are useful in
hunting.
"If the Army came to us and
said they wanted us to develop
a new rifle, my own attitude
would be that this would be no
business of the University-we
should not engage in a clearly
identifiable, military weapons
project."
And this seems to be where
the University now draws the
line.
1RAMSEYI

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Gilb~rt Bursley

Let's get to the
HART OF THE TROUBLE!
DEMOCRATS ARE GRANDIOSE SPENDERS:
" Voted more money for old Great Society
programs
" Turned tax reforms into deficit
" Overridden vetoes against inflation
JOIN THE FIGHT AGAINST INFLATION

1

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