100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"Friday, -October 30, 1970

I 'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pioge Nine

~Friday, October 30, 1970 ll-iE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Nine

SYSTEM DISPUTED

ui.r

I

i[
;

C

RAMSEY
CLARK
Tonight
Rackhim
8 P.M.

OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLA I NTS -9a.m. - 11 :30a. m.
SUBSCRIPTIONS - 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-1 p r.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-- 12:30 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554
MONDAY --9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TUESDAY thru FRIDAY - 1 p.m. 4 p.m.
DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Monday at NOON for Tuesday's paper

By TIM OBOJSKI
The annual assimilation of
talent by the university, known
somewhat infamously as recruit-
ing, has long been surrounded
by controversy. Currently under-
going regulatory action by the
NCAA, the process has been per-
iodically scrutinized from a var-
iety of angles, eliciting a variety
of responses and opinions.
Certainly, vigorous recruiting
programs are commonplace in
the nation's universities w i t h
their efforts to reestablish wan-

ing prestige or maintain an ath-
letic excellence already achiev-
ed.
In the highly competitive
world of collegiate football (a
competitiveness that is n o t re-
stricted to the playing field, but
which extends to recruiting it-
self), it is perhaps the only al-
ternative to floundering anony-
mously outside the national
polls or being a perennial also-
ran.
OBVIOUSLY, the necessary
ingredients of Coach Bo Schem-

b chler's grid cake are not con-
veniently incarnated on his
doorstep. He must send forth a
battery of assistants in an at-
tempt to gather the best of
what is available, determined
previously by alumni scouting
reports, game films, and what-
ever else can be used in eval-
uation. It is they who are rele-
gated to the task of persuading
the promising prospects of
Michigan's superiority.
The objects of all this effort,
the players themselves, are divi-

Recruiting:

Key to success

I-

. _...r........

..I

For the student body:
FLARES,
by
" Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
Sebring
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

ded in their reaction to the sys-
tem. Mike Hoben, a frosh guard
and defensive end from Chicago,
Illinois, regarded the attentions
he received favorably. Approach-
ed by a Michigan assistant dur-
ing the summer prior to his, sen-
ior year in high school, he was
also barraged by a host of other
schools, including eight of the
remaining nine in the Big Ten.
The standard recruiting pro-
cedure includes a tour of the
campus and dinner, and an in-
formal chat with the folks as-
suring them of the school's mer-
its. But the inducements a r e
often more elaborate and ex-
tensive than that.
Michigan cordially sent him
a Christmas card from the Rose
Bowl, and even conspicuously
welcomed him to Ann Arbor by
entering his name on the mar-
quee of the motel in which he
stayed between his several ex-
cursions included in his "grand
tour.",
Mike's final decision came af-
ter a stalemate with the as-
sistant coach assigned to him.
Although his inclinations were
toward Michigan, he wasn't ab-
solutely certain of his tentative
choice and said so, whereupon
the assistant picked up a phone
and replied, "I'll let you talk
with Bo." Bo asked simply,
"Are you coming?" and that was
that.
IN REPLY TO an inquiry of
his feelings toward the recruit-
ing system, Mike said, "I like
it. I had a good time," and he
mentioned that it made the
years of sweat and blood on the
gridiron worth while.
Not everyone was so generous
in their appraisal. Dave Galla-
gher, a frosh linebacker and of-
fensive tackle from Piqua, Ohio,
had some reservations.'Although
he felt it was a "necessary thing,"
he cited the constant badgering
and salespitch and said, "It gets
a little hectic," and thathe
"was glad to get it over with."
And finally, completing 'th e
gamut of responses, was this
terse comment, "It's bullshit."
Perhaps it is, but it remains ef-
fective. And necessary. And
despite all its faults, appreciat-
ed.

I
i

J

I

A

:4

14

r

'd

..
. .

INA yl

l y
.

Pd. Political Adv
PULL THE LEVER FOR LEN

-Associated Press
u.a.c. muggers: 1beware
Eric "The Red" Siegel (right), leader of the Daily Libels, warms up in a secret practice session
with the Libels famous wolfback. Siegel, the wolfback, and the rest of the Libels encounter the
u.a.c. muggers this Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at South Ferry Field.

For COUNTY COMMISSIONER-2nd Word, Democrat
X ERNEST L. QUENON
LEN PLEDGES TO FIGHT FOR..
* Greater openness in County Government
* Fairer tax assessment
* Humane and adequate welfare
0 Establishment of drug abuse clinics
* Ending pollution of our streams and air
Also Pull The Lever For. .

I

I

I

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
CANDIDATES
AGAINST THE WAR
These Candidates Have Read and Endorsed the
PROPOSALS LISTED BELOW: **

FUNDING FOR HOUSING
THE VOTE FOR 18 YEAR OLDS

PROPOSITION A
PROPOSITION B

A loaf of bread
A jug of wine
And thou.
THE
CHARCOAL
HOUSE

0

'is business gf}survival

CANDIDATE
PHILIP HART ......... .
SANDER LEVIN ........
FRANK KELLEY ........
PATRICIA CARRIGAN .,..
MICHAEL STILLWAGON .
DON KOSTER ..........
SUZANNE FREUND....
DOROTHY HUNAWILL . .
JOHN EVANS ...........
VANELL WILLIAMS ....
GILBERT LEE .........
ERNEST QUENON ....
NELSON MEADE .......
JERRY BENNETT ........
JOHN F. BARNES .......
ANNETTA MILLER .....
DAVID ROBINSON ......
LEON ALCHISON .......
MAX PINCUS ..........
GEORGE WAHR SALLADE
ALBERT BREDERNITZ ...
JAMES M. CREGAR ......

FOR OFFICE OF
U.S. Senator
Governor
Attorney Genl.
Mich. St. Bd. of Trustees
U.S. Congress, 2d Dist.
State Rep. 53d Dist.
State Rep. 52d Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr.,
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr.,

338 S. STATE

(*stone-ground, whole whea j

You'll Find
MICHIGAN
Beer Mugs Gls
Warre 9Playing
Cards 0Bookends
Ash Trays0 Sweat
CL _ a . L!.

7:30-10 P.M.

2d Dist.
4th Dist.

Under the incentives of national survival, the aerospace industry,
utilizing advanced technologies, has developed into a permanent,
flexible and highly diversified industry. The need to apply the
aerospace systems approach to pollution control, mineral explora-
tion, environmental planning, agriculture, forest management,
desalting of sea water, modern transportation, air transport and
control has greatly added to this diversification. Since the aero-
space industry is not directly geared to the consumer, its benefits
are social ... national survival on one hand ... a better life on
the other.
The'new Ecosystems endeavor at Grumman is ideally
suited to the task of giving man greater controlover his environ-
ment because of the Life-support Systems experience gained
from the Lur ar Module and undersea submersibles.,
Positioned in the forefront of this remarkable industry
and fed by the ideas emanating from its own advanced planning,
scientific disciplines and industrial skills, 2┬░Grumman pushes the
aerospace art forward in deep submergence vessels, hydrofoil
seacraft, advanced aircraft including business transport, lunar
landing vehicles and space stations.
It's only natural, in a company that has quintupled in
size in the last decade, that professional and management re-
sponsibilities would proceed apace. Wide Open is the word at
Grumman, and the message for Engineering, Math, and Business
Administration majors. Problem solving is the way of life in
Engineering, Research, Environmental Management and various
business oriented areas.
Can you provide cogent solutions?
Grumman is'situated in Long Island, 30 miles from N.Y.C.
The white sand beaches of the Atlantic are 12 minutes away...
the famed sailing reaches of Long Island Sound, an eleven-mile
drive.. . five beautiful public golf courses right in Bethpage-2
minutes from Grumman.
Grumman representatives will be on campus
TLIIlDRVAV InVEAR D 10711

Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 5th Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 6th Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 7th Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 8th Dist.
. . Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 11 th Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 12th Dist.
State Board of Education
. . State Board of Education
Wayne St. Bd. of Governors
Wayne St. Bd. of Governors
State Sen. 18th Sentrl. Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 9th Dist.
Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 12th Dist.

Shirts C!IT-Shirts
Jackets Caps
Hats 0 Six Footers
Gloves *Blankets
Car 0 Robes
Banners
Pennants
RINGS AND
JEWELRY
AT
f OLLETTS
iX

1. A Publicized Timetable for Rapid Withdrawal of All
American Troops from Indochina;
***2. An Immediate End to All Bombing by American Planes
of Any Country in Indochina;'
***3. A Drastic Reduction in the Subsidization of Military
Operations in These Countries;
s7 2*4. A Substantial Reduction in the Use of Our Taxes for
Military Appropriations Including Armaments; and

L 15 ii"

A Much Greater Proportion of Taxes Spent on Meeting
the Pressing Domestic Needs of Our Country Including

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan