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October 21, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-21

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-

M

BOOK SALE
EVERYTHING IN STORE REDUCED
20% OFF LIST ON NEW
50% OFF LIST ON USED
Come in and browse.
Get required books for the rest of the term
Sale lasts until October 23
STUDGNT 700K SGRVICG
1215 S. UNIVERSITY

Wednesday, Oct. 21
FORCE OF EVIL
dir. ABRAHAM POLONSKY (1948)
Polonsky, blacklisted ,during the Hollywood
witch hunts, returned to the screen only last
year with the highly acclaimed Tell Them
Willie Boy is Here. Sarris considers Force
of Evil "one of the great films of the modern
American cinema."
Short: ANYTHING ONCE, with Mabel Normand
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

I

DOUBLE FEATURE-THRU SATURDAY

Hidden
WASHINGTON WP) -- Sugar,
shipping and cable TV groups are
special support to their favorit
gressmen this year with campaign
tions to hidden fund-raising comm
A sugar lobbyist helped orga
special campaign fund in the n
capital for Democratic House
Hale Boggs (D-La), a top can
to become House majority leade
- January.
Two seamen's groups cha
$5,000 into a hidden campaign
mittee for Rep. Edward A. Garma
Md), chairman of the House Me
Marine Committee, who is uno
for re-election.
A milk producers' political fun
$3,500 to another hidden commit
Rep. Graham Purcell (D-Tex),
news
THE GOVERNMENT abrupt
terday against S. Sgt. David Mit
pation in the alleged My Lai mass
The case was dismissed after t
ed at his court-martial and none w
dant shot a civilian at My Lai.
The defense was tentatively s
today providing it could collect w
Attorney Ossie Brown told newsme
by surprise."
Mitchell, 30, is the first My L
court-martial. He is charged with
unarmed Vietnamese civilians dur
through the sub hamlet March 16,
STRIKING STEWARDESSE
Trans World Airlines to cancel
curtail overseas service to Franc
Africa.
Federal mediators continued e
wage dispute between the AFL-CI
TWA, the nation's second largest ai
* *
THE PHILADELPHIA FED)
Philadelphia school board have
million, two-year package endi
the nation's fifth largest school sy
Leonard M. Sagot, attorney f
the teachers will return to work tod
date on whether to accept or reject t
Agreement was reached at a
school board negotiators and three
The panel of judges also rul
no pay for the time they were out o
* *
THE SPACE AGENCY said y
of the moon, brought back by the
were missing in the mail system s
The national Aeronautics and
asked the Post Office department
of two shipments mailed from Nas
September 28.
The samples, totaling 13 gram
were sent by registered mail to the
oratory of Columbia University an
in New York City for the American]
- c
2
STOP
Tt* F#

milk,
giving
e con-
dona-
nittees.
nize a
ation's
Whip
ndidate
r next
nneled
com-
atz (D-
rchant
pposed
d gave
tee for
chair-

man of the House agriculture subcom-
mittee on livestock.
These key congressmen head a list of
at least 28 House candidates with so-
called "D. C. committees" set up in the
District of Columbia which, in contrast
to many states, has no law requiring
public disclosure of campaign receipts
and spending.
Milton G. Nottingham Jr., a shipping
businessman who was local treasurer for
the Garmatz committee, added, "A con-
gressman or senator has only two sour-
ces of raising money. One is his con-
stituents and the other is the people
who have interests in his activities on
the Hill."
"It's a legal and convenient way to
raise money from people around town.
A 'D. C. committee' has gotten to be a

standard performance," said lobbyist
Irvin Hoff.
Hoff, who represents the U.S. Cane
Sugar Refiners' Association helped set
up the "D. C. Friends of Hale Boggs."
Thirty men gathered at a private home
one night in July to chip in contribu-
tions to the House leader.
The "D. C. Friends of Graham Pur-
cell" got $3,500 from one found, the
Trust for Agricultural Political Educa-
tion, which is linked with a milk pro-
ducers group in San Antonio, Tex.
"We don't really dig in and question
why they contribute. We're just happy
to get it," said Don Taylor, treasurer
for the Purcell committee.
The political arm of the Seafarers un-
ion reported it gave $3,000 to the "D.C.
Committee for Garmatz." But the Ma-

funds aid congressional campaigns

brie fs
By The Associated Press
ly cut short its assault case yes-
chell, who is accused of partici-
acre.
hree prosecution witnesses appear-
was able to say whether the defen-
cheduled to open its presentation
witnesses on short notice. Defense
en: "I think everybody was caught
ai veteran to be brought before a
assault with intent to murder 30
ring an American infantry sweep
1966.
* *
ES and pursers yesterday forced
all its U.S. flights and sharply
e, Greece, Switzerland, Asia and
efforts to settle the 14-month old
O Transport Workers Union and
T carrier.
*
ERATION of teachers and the
reached agreement on a $57.3'
ng the three-day strike against
stem.
or the 11,000 member union, said
day, but will vote at an unspecified
the agreement.
conference between union and
judges.
ed that the teachers will receive
n strike.
*

(17 4

iirl t gttn

Wednesday, October 21, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michgan Page Three

Poverty areas
struck byri'sing
unemployment-
WASHINGTON () - The Labor Department reported yes-
terday that unemployment in the poorest neighborhoods of
the nation's 100 largest cities has climbed by more than 30
per cent in the past year.
The report, by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, said the
overall jobless rate climbed from 5.7 to 8.3 per cent of the to-
tal work force in the poverty neighborhoods over the year,
compared with a rise from 3.3 to 4.8 per cent for other big
city neighborhoods.
The 8.3 per cent jobless rate in the poor neighborhoods
compares with the nation's overall unemployment rate of 5.5
per cent at last report in September, the highest in nearly
seven years. The national jobless rate was 3.8 per cent a year
ago. The report said the climb
in unemployment in the poor "
neighborhoods was about in Guerrillas
line with the national rise.

rine Engineers Beneficial Association
was less candid. Its group listed a $2,-
000 donation only as going to: "Milton
Nottingham, treasurer."
The money showed up in a search
of the reports to Congress that national
political-groups, such as those for labor
unions and industry lobbies, must file,
itemizing all contributions.
A cable TV group reported a $1,000
contribution to an organization called
the "Committee for Effective Govern-
ment."
It was traced as a fund-raising body
for Rep. Torbert H. Macdonald, (D-
Mass). MacDonald is chairman of the
House, communications subcommittee
which has held hearings on cable TV.
These reports listed such names as

"D.C. Friends of karth," "D.C. Broy-
hill Boosters Committee, "D.C. O'Neill
Committee," and "Sparky's friends in
the District of Columbia."
Other contributions to various D.C.
committees came from such industry
groups as the highway lobby, savings
associations, real estate, automobile
dealers, restaurants, motels and coal
mining. Labor unions' political groups
were high on the list, also.
Incumbent congressmen aren't th e
only politicians with D.C. committees.
Two others cropped up bearing the
names of two non-incumbents-House
candidates Bruce Shine in Tennessee
and Virgil Musser in Ohio.
Still another D.C. committee bore the
name of a candidate for governor in the
Virgin Islands.

esterday that two tiny fragments
Apollo 12 mission last November,
omewhere.
Space Administration said it has
to look into the delay in delivery
sau Bay near Houston, Texas last
s - less than half an ounce -
Lamont-Doherty Geological Lab-
d to the Army post office number
Embassy in Saudi Arabia.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
agen by students at the Universit of
Mic~higan. Newpw hone: 764-0552. Secnd

i
i
i
1
3

-Associated Press
Eskimo marcher
An Eskimo woman and her child, bundled against the 30-degree
weather, participate in yesterday's march which officially opened
the 27th annual convention of the National Congress of American
Indians in Anchorage, Alaska.
SEEKS PANEL
Agnewlv, asks views

of TV

F'IFTH For'um
PIPYM AV6UUUAT LISE4Y
D11 OWNTOWN ANN ARBOR

ALSO

Richard Boone, Bibi Andersson in
."THE- KREMLIN LETTER"
The Newest Thriller from John Huston,
Master Director of "The Maltese Falcon"
KREMLI N LETTER-7:00
DOWNHILL RACER-9:00

1YLi1 [1.Av . 1V1. IY , . C U
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.
I-

CHICAGO VP)--Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew suggested yes-
terday that a panel of govern-
ment officials "examine" news
commentators so that any pre-
judices the newsmen may have
could be brought before the
public.
"The people who are watching
that tube have a right to know
what your opinions are if you
happen to be a man who is tell-
ing the news every night," Ag-
new told two television inter-
viewers in Chicago.
The vice president said news-
men can select parts of the
news they wish to emphasize
and by their language "can
convey a point of view that is
not 'an editorial yet is colored
by their own viewpoint."
"It would be very interesting,"
Agnew said, "to have a show-

,tews me n
a panel type show where sen-
ators from either party, repre-
sentatives, I suppose maybe a
couple of governors-could sit
down with someone who has
a national reputation as a com-
mentator .. . and just examine
him in depth on where he stands
personally on the issues he talks
about every day."
Agnew particularly mentioned
Frank Reynolds and Howard K
Smith, anchormen on ABC eve-
ning news, and Eric Sevareid of
CBS and did not directly in-
clude print newsmen. But a
spokesman said later "you can
safely assume" Agnew meant
the print media too.
Agnew brought up the subject
during the taping of an inter-
view with Chicago newspaper-
man Irv Kupcinet and Charles
Roberts of Newsweek Magazine.

The situation was worst among
black teenagers, whose jobless
rate rose to nearly 35 per cent,
the report said.
"The number of unemployed
persons in poverty neighborhoods
averaged 510,000 in the t h i r d
quarter of 1970, up about 150,000
from the third quarter of 1969,"
it said.
"Jobless rates for both -whites
and blacks from poverty neigh-
borhoods were up sharply o v e r
the year. T h e jobless rate for
whites moved from 4.4 to 6.6 per
cent and that for blacks from 7.5
to 10.8 per cent," it said.
T h e national unemployment
rate among white workers is 5.1
per cent and the rate for blacks
is 9 per cent.
"Most of the increased jobless-
ness in poverty neighborhoods ov-
er the year t a o k place among
adult men, both white and black.
The jobless rate for black men
rose from 3.9 to 7.9 per cent while
the rate for white men rose from
2.8 to 5.1 per cent," the report
said.
The national jobless rate for all
men is 4 per cent.
The jobless rate for white teen-
agers in poverty neighborhoods
moved up from 17.2 to 17.7 per
cent and for black teenagers from
29.3 to 34.9 per cent, compared
with 16.8 per cent nationally for
all teenagers, the report said.
Unemployment climbed slightly
faster for whites in the p o or
neighborhoods, but blacks had
a continuing higher jobless rate.

battlearmy in
north Jordan
By The Associated Press
New fighting broke out yester-
day in'northern Jordan between
government troops and Palestinian
guerrillas. In Cairo, moderate
Mahmoud Fawzi was -named prime
minister and hard-liner Mohsen
Abul Nur secretary-general of
Egypt's only political party.
An Arab peace commission in
the Jordanian capital of Amman
issued an urgent call for a cease-
fire in new fighting at Ramtha,
near the Syrian border. Guerrilla
leader Yasir Arafat said govern-
ment forces also attacked at Al
Turrah village, close to the border.
In Cairo, the Central Commit-
tee of the ruling Arab Socialist
Union approved unanimously Sa-
dat's selection of Fawzi as the
new prime minister. Fawzi was one
of the late President Gamal Abdel
Nasser's chief foreign affairs ad-
visers for 18 years.
Sadat and the Central Commit
tee balanced appointment of the
moderate, 70-year-old Fawzi by
naming the hard-lining Abul Nur
to the powerful post of secretary-
general of the Socialist Union,
Egypt's only political party.
AbulNur, 49, whose influence
in the government could exceed
Fawzi's, is known to have strong
sympathies for -the Soviet Union.

if

TONIGHT AT 8:00 !
"Beautiful ... Speaks to All Generations!"
-N.Y. TIMES

A i

braid-edged rawhide. .
Tough, man. ..especially
when worn with flare bottoms
and the wide belt.
Great colors, too! Navy,
brown or off-white.

Now National General Theatres MON.-FRI.
Showing FOH VILLAGE 1:40-3:30
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 5:20-:15-9:00
"A SHOCKER! FASCINATING!"A
-New York Daily News
THIS 13 THE DAWNING OF THE AGE OF
:,.THE FORBIN PROJECT"
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE - TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISIONC

::1
., .,,
+
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b
G
d

r W

THURSDAY,

OCTOBER 22

AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL

4:00 p.m.

"THE FUTURE OF JEWISH-CHRISTIAN RELATIONS: A BACKWARD VIEW"
PROFESSOR NOEL FREEDMAN, coming
to the University of Michigan next year as
Coordinator of Studies in Religion to work
for expanded offerings in the area of Re-
:rfligious Studies and raise money for a pro-
jected Institute for Studies in Religion;
currently Director, American School of

S, M, L. $18.
t ..............

TICKETS

11

STILL AVAILABLE FOR

Thurs., Oct. 22, 8:30
Sieve Miller
Rand

Sat., Oct. 24, 8:30

Ten Wheel
friva

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