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October 09, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-09

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Page 'Two,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 9, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 9, 1970 #

theatre
Overland Stage:
Innovative intimacy

By SUE FISHER
Elusive is the best word to
describe the Overland Stage.
The newly formed theater
troupe is difficult to track down.
Designed to be "on the move"
theater, they fulfill that func-
tion well. The personal inspira-
tion of director, Greg Jarboe,
the Overland Stage has only
been in existence about a
month, but will ambitiously tac-
kle its first two plays, October
15 through 17.
Totally independent of t h e
Speech Department, Jarboe,
stage manager, Gay Clement,
and a troup of four actors, will
present Harold Pinter's A Slight
Ache and The Love Pickle by
Richard Starkweather.
Intimacy, portability, and in-
novation distinguish the Over-
land Stage from more tradi-
tional, established University
theater where "anybody can Put
on a play," Jarboe emphasizes.
Actors, Chris Lahti, Allison
Fine," Steve Kronovet, an d
Richard Sale work to achieve a
personal closeness w ith the
audience. They are attempting,
under Jarboe's direction, to get

away from line recitation and
obvious obedience of the di-
rector's commands.
Jarboe feels that this style is
a definite departure from the
University Players and Student
Laboratory Production. Armed
with novel ideas from his year
in Scotland, at the Traverse
Theater, he created the Over-
land Stage as a personal ex-
periment. Could a tiny group of
roving players, reminiscent of a
medieval minstrel show, m o r e
effectively capture the mood of
some of the current play-
wrights? Practical experience
and involvement in creative, dy-
namic theater was more val-
uable than formal university
training, he believes. He re-
turned to Ann Arbor this fall
with the desire to manipulate
some of 'the formal actor-aud-
ience barriers and effectively
break them down. He describes
the group as "Greg Jarboe's
neurotic demonstration of 1970."
Routine performances are de-
emphasized and "only accept-
able" character studies are dis-
couraged.N
A glimpse at Overland Stage
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BORIS GODUNOV
Moussorgsky's opera based on Pushkin's story.
With the leading singers, chorus, orchestra and
ballet of the Bolstoi Theater, Moscow, starring
Alexander Pirogov as Boris. Russians dialog with
English subtitles.
full of pageantry, pomp and spectacle . . a rich
IIPSI musical masterpiece. A. Pirogor is an -impressive Boris with
P " a deep stirring bass that conveys all the pathos and drama
the Golden Voice of the role. .
of the Great Southwest -VARIE.TY
A veritable pot-pourri of
jokes, tales, songs in the
tastelessness characteristic af THIS FRIDAY - October 9, 7 and 9 p.m.
the old West. NOTE THE CHANGE IN LOCATION
Tues. R.F.D. BOYS University Reformed Church
Next Week: 1 001 E. HURON (at the junction of Flecher and Huron)
BILLY VANAUER
75e
1.50 ........
141 il{TRE It *
1~1A S"
af
7 f 1.4
.74~4s4.

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4'
-4

rehearsals confirms this casual,
intimate approachEve]yn and
Harold. the two principal char-
acters in The Love Pickle, dis-
cuss the problems of sexual
identity, morality, and the in-
evitability of war in a men's
washroom, which is probably an
appropriate setting for this far-
cicial melodrama. Tedious cliches
are mocked as are exaggerated
feelings. Harold describes inter-
course as an "existential expeh-
ience."
Allison Fine as Evelyn and
Steve Kronovet at Harold share
a close rapport with Jarboe.
With only three people involv-
ed, there is a unique simplicity
and quietude to rehearsals.
Missing is the usual hub-bub -
an aggravated stage crew and
other actors holding their own
private rehearsals off to the
side.
One can almost sense that the
dialogue, both responses and re-
actions, becomes less automatic
as rehearsals progress. Memori-

zation of lines blends into a na-
tural exchange of ideas a n d
thoughts.
In May, Jarboe plans to take
the troupe on a tour through
Europe. hopefully including
some Iron Curtain countries.
Grania, a never-performed play,
by the Irish playwright, L ad y
Gregory, will be added to the re-
pertoire. It is another intimate,
three-character play. Jarboe
prefers to limit the scope of the

-Daily--Jim Judkis
group by concentrating on cafe-
style theater, instead of more
extensive productions.
Richard Sale and Chris Lahti
are in the Pinter play. The re-
hearsals are back to back every
afternoon, usually in E a s t
Quad's Lecture Auditorium. The
first performance, October 15,
will be at Canterbury H o u, s e.
The October 16 and 17 perform-
ances will be in the Residential
College Auditorium.

U

OPENS TUES.

DON'T MISS!

Ca/en qma

Every

MONDAY:

Football Night, color TV
happy hour prices

I1

Every TUESDAY:

I

I

11

I

-Daily-Jim Judkis

NOTICE
Beginning October 14 the
Book Review page will appear
regularly on Wednesdays. In-t
dividuals are invited to contact
the book review editor, Robert
Conrow, regarding reviews or
suggestions.
Art museum
extends hours
The Museum of Art, located
in Alumni Memorial Hall, has
extended viewing hours on Wed-
nesday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The Museum is open Tuesday
through Sunday.
An exhibition of photographs
from all periods in the career of
the world famous Margaret
Nu rke-White will run through
Nov. '15.
Also being shown are displays
on African and Oceanic Art,
prints from the 16th and 17th
centuries and paintings of the
Ming and Ching dynasties.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results !

DosOeDIAL 8-6416

:

Doors Open ,
at 6:40
JHEOREATSITCEFAIE

Shows at
& 9

~Brf1ne_..
2ogetIner.

I9,

IDO i.,Fe1D&01*-1

0

CINEMA II

I

BERGMAN'S

HOUR OF THE WOLF
A TALE OF FRIGHT AND HORROR AS
ONLY BERGMAN COULD TELL IT.

"A LIVING NIGHTMARE"

-A. Landis

r A VI #ft V ---'J I Uft E VI.

I

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