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October 09, 1970 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-09

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GUILD HOUSE
-802 Monroe-
Friday, Oct. 9-NOON LUNCHEON
35c

page three

ZtiI P

Sfirtgitn

al"I'llatly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, October 9, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

PROF. JOHN WATERBURRY, Dept. of Political Science:
"Un-answerable Questions About the Middle East"

news briefs
By The Associated Press

i

I

Milt
!

LAST 2 PERFS. AT 8 SHARP!
brecht
CHALK CIRCLE
TONIGHT and TOMORROW at 8!
Trueblood-Box Office Opens 12:30
SEASON TIX ON SALE THRU SAT.

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1

Thurs.-Fri.--Oct. 8-9
SANSHO 'THE BALIFF
dir. KENJI MIZOGUCHI (1954)
Abduction and revenge in medieval Japan as de-
picted by one of Japan's trio of Masters. The movie
approaches the pity and terror of a Greek tragedy.
SAT.-SUN: Kurosawa's Ikiru
7 & 9:30 Architecture
(not 9:05) 75c
662-88Auditorium
. 662-887

SLEEPING BEAR DUNES National Lakeshore was finally
approved by Congress Wednesday night. and now needs only
President Nixon's signature to become a reality.
The bill, which pended in Congress for 10 years, will bring 61,000
acres of Lake Michigan dunes country into the national park system.
Most of the property is to be bought by the government, but the
Michigan legislature will be required to donate 8,373 acres of state-
owned land.
VICE PRESIDENT AGNEW said yesterday that polarization
on political issues is inevitable and that certain extremists and
law violators should be "separated for the good of the majority."
Speaking to a group of newspaper editors, Agnew said that
in a nation of 200 million people not everyone can become a pro-
ductive member of society, and that "we must recognize that it is
important to separate some of the people from our society so theyI
don't impair and impede our progress."
NORTH KOREAN "volunteers" are reportedly fighting in
Cambodia on the Communist side, apparently in response to the
50,000 troops sent by the South Korean government to fight
alongside the Allies.
The report came from Taing Kauk; where Cambodian field of-
ficers say at least one North Korean batallion was involved in the
fighting.
Meanwhile, the American command reports that 43,775 Ameri-
cans have been killed in Vietnam since 1961.
*' * *

'Quebec group
continuehold,
on British aide.
MONTREAL (R) - The fate of a kidnaped B r i t i s h diplo-
mat was uncertain last night as various deadlines for his
release passed without indication of agreement between his
abductors, the Quebec Liberation Front and the Canadian
government.
A communique found Thursday afternoon in a telephone
booth said James Richard Cross, 49, British senior trade
commissioner who was seized Monday, was in no danger at the
moment.
It set a new deadline - Thursday midnight - for his
release and also asked the government to specify which of the
abductors' ransom demands were considered unreasonable.
Foreign Secretary Mitchell Sharp on Tuesday rejected seven
ransom demands as "wholly unreasonable."
The kidnapers, members of and =

-Associated Press
Protest in South Africa

Some 3,000 South African students demonstrated in Johannesburg
yesterday in protest of their government's policies. Police who
escorted the marchers said that the procession was generally

THE AIR FORCE said yesterday that "very stringent rules" peaceful.
prevent indiscriminate air attacks on Laotian civilian centers by -- -- ---------- -- ----- -- -- -
U.S. pilots. DL't'T1M/rNTmT IN REVOLT:
The statement was made after publication of a series of news REGIMENT I R VT
stories reporting that U.S. pilots have been bombing Laotian villages
for more than two years.
The Air Force said no strikes are made in Laos without approval C O lO n el th rec
of the royal Laotian government and that "no reports of indiscriminate

..vr.,avas frwo bv.ava waaJ

tens

MAKE HER ACCEPTANCE OFFICIAL
WITH AN ENGAGEMENT DIAMOND
Your proposal was brilliant. Her acceptance
sweet. And now it's time to publicize the pledge
with a diamond on her finger. Our
selection is wide and brilliant. We'll help you
choose the right ring. To announce your
honorable intentions to the world.

bombing have been received.
SDS IS DEAD, a victim of its own success, the House In-
ternal Security Committee said yesterday.
The committee said Students for a Democratic Society began
as a reformist student movement intent on working within the
system, but found its greatest success beginning in the mid-1960s as it
turned more and more militant and radical.
"As the ranks swelled, both the direction and objectives of SDS
changed radically - moving from dissent on behalf of reform to
open resistance and finally to revolutionary violence and virtual
anarchy," the report said.
THE SOVIET UNION agreed Thursday to fliscuss an inter-
national space rescue system with the U.S. and ten other coun-
tries.
If space rescue agreement is reached, it would be the first major
effort at space cooperation by two major powers.
The agreement came at the 21st Congress of the International
Astronautical Federation, where the week-long theme was interna-
tional space cooperation.
GENERAL MOTORS and the United Auto Workers go back
to economic bargaining today, in the 25-day-old strike that has{
idled approximately 400,000 workers.
The new round of talks was requested by UAW President'Leonard
Woodcock Wednesday.
Local-level settlements between GM and the UAW have been re-
ported at plants in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and in Syracuse, New York.

new Bolivian regime

extremist French-Canadian move-
ment that seeks independence for
Quebec Province, have asked for
$500,000 in gold bars and the re-
lease of 21 imprisoned terrorists
along with a plane to take them to
Cuba in exchange for Cross.
The communique rejected an of-
fer of the government to appoint
a Cabinet minister to negotiate
with the kidnapers. It -called the
offer a trap.,
An earlier communication be-
tween the abductors and the
Canadian government, delivered to
a French-language radio station
yesterday, indicated that the ter-
rorists might be willing to scale
down their monetary demands,
police officials suggested.
The communication ended with
the sentence : "Be assured that we,
for our part, will not put the life
of diplomat T. Cross in danger over
questions of dollars."
The government won an ex-
tension of the terrorists' deadline
until noon yesterday by agreeing
to broadcast a "manifesto" pre-
sented by the front. The document,
calling for a Quebec revolution to
"replace an enslaved society by a
free society," was broadcast by a
Montreal French language sta-
tion Wednesday night. Foreign
Secretary Mitchell Sharp said the
government would arrange to have
it broadcast over Radio Canada's
radio and television facilities.
"We are fed tip, and so are more
and more Quebecois, with a spine-
less government which makes one
thousand and one somersaults to
charm American millionaires while
begging them to come and invest
in Quebec," the 1,400-word mani-
festo said.

Congress to
reorganize
WASHINGTON (W) - Congress
gave final approval yesterday to a
reorganization bill that dilutes
some of the powers of committee
chairmen, ends secret House vot-
ing, opens House committee to
television coverage but leaves the
senority system intact.
The House, by voice vote, com,-
pleted action on the measure,
climaxing a five-year fight by
younger members against a re-
luctant leadership.
Other changes, will permit. elec-
tronic voting in the. House, give
Congress a summer vacation, pro-
vide free tours of Capitol for visit-
ors and build a dormitory and
school for Congressional pages.
Another change in the House
section of the bill calls for sealing
off the visitors' galleries from the
House chamber with transparent,
bullet-proof barriers.
In other congressional action
yesterday, a proposed $15 billion
ceiling on the Vietnam war and
forced withdrawal of all U.S.
troops by next June were quickly
and soundly defeated by the
House.
An amendment by Rep. Donald
W. Riegle Jr. (R-Mich.), to put
a $15 billion Vietnam war ceiling
on the $66.7 billion defense ap-
propriation-which he said would
"lock in President Nixon's efforts
to end the war"-was defeated by
voice vote.

LA PAZ, Bolivia (om) - The one-'
day-old leftist-civilian regime of
Gen. J u a n Jose Torres was
threatened with military revolt
last night by a regimental com-
mander who claimed broad army
support.
Earlier, Torres' military-civil-
ian regime received the backing of
the powerful Bolivian Workers
Federation.
Col. Miguel Ayoroa, commander
of t h e important La Paz-based
Ingavi regiment, announced his
opposition to Torres' infant gov-
ernment last night, posing t h e
latest confrontation between Bo-
livia's military chieftains.
He demanded a government
that would be "truly nationalis-
tic" and said the 317 officers who
voted Monday to oust Presidents
Alfredo Ovando were in agree-
ment with him.
Torres took over the presidency
Wednesday aifter toppling a con-
servative, three-man military
ta that held power for only 12
hours after replacing Ovando, al-
so a general.
The quick shuffle of power be-
tween opposing leftist and right-
ist generals is commonplace for
Bolivia, one of the world's most
politically unstable countries. It
has averaged more than one gov-
ernment upset per year since
gaining independence in the 1820s.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

Torres, trying to keep his gov-
ernment afloat, said it was based
on workers, farmers, students and
the military. His backing by the
workers federation was expected
but also was the probable trigger
of the new opposition to Torres
by more conservative military
leaders.
The federation's members in-
clude former Vice President Juan
Lechin, the fiery tin mine work-
ers' leader once banished to Chile
and .Paraguay for organizing re-
volts. He was elected vice presi-
dent in 1960.
Under the slogan "workers to
the power," the federation agreed
to 'participate in the government
and, to give an austere image, re-,
quested a reduction in Cabinet
ministers' salaries. T h e salaries
are about $800 a month.

Congressional witnesses claim.
radical plot against policemen

9

I

BAITS TG TONIGHT!

s

GRAD MIXER
9-I Stanley Lounge Baits I
$1 .00 Guys-25c Chicks
2 ID's required

WASHINGTON (1P) - Thou-
sands of young revolutionaries
in inner cities a n d campuses
are learning to make and use
antipolice weapons in a loosely
knit but nationwide "kill the
pigs" movement, police witness-
es told Congress yesterday.
Several told the Senate in-
ternal security subcommittee
that from "storefront colleges"
in Buffalo, N.Y., to Santa Bar-
bara, Calif., to Seattle, Wash.,
radical students, black militants
and other groups are inciting
their followers to k ill police
officers and firemen.

Shop
Mon. & Fri.
'til 8:25

Main at Washington

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02

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Ilb- -d6mmW

Contemporary Directions 1970-71
presents
h
Ther Michigan Contemporary
Directions Ensemble
FIRST CONCERT, RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
8:00 P.M.-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10,1970
PHYLLIS MAILING, Guest Soprano
SYDNEY HODKINSON, Conductor
PROGRAM'
Peter Phillips,.................... Divertimento
Loren Rush ........................Nexus 16
INTERMISSION-

"INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY
IN TIME OF WAR"
RICHARD WASSERSTROM
Professor of Philosophy and Law, UCLA
4:15 P.M., FRIDAY, OCT. 9
ROOM 150, HUTCHINS HALL,
LAW SCHOOL
JOINTLY SPONSORED BY THE PHILOSOPHY
DEPARTMENT AND THE LAWYER'S CLUB

"The groups we are dealing
with today are not innocent,
misinformed students," Sheriff
Michael A. Amico of Erie Coun-
ty, New York, told the panel.
"They know precisely what they
are doing. Their ultimate goal
is not reform, but revolution.
They preach peace . . . but
practice violence on an ever in-
creasing level."
Edward J. Kiernan, president
of the Patrolmen's Benevolent
Association of New York City,
spoke of a "calculated, nation-
wide attack on police . . . an
assault on the very foundation
e of our society."
"It appears that local or
state courts are unable to cope
with the senseless murder of
police officers," said Royce L.
Givens, executive director of the
International Conference of Po-
lice Associations. He urged a
strong federal law to curb the
alleged assaults.
About two dozen witnesses
have urged the subcommittee to
approve tough new laws against.
assaulting policemen and fire-
men or inciting others to do so.
One witness who said he was

a former -New York undercover
agent testified that he attend-
ed classes and workshops where
"off the pigs" - kill the police
- rhetoric was prevalent and
instructions were given on mak-
ing molotov cocktails, explosive
mines and other weapons.
"I only wish I could put across
to you what it feels like to be
trained to kill a police officer,"
said the witness, bearded Kevin
Caffery, 23.
Caffery, whose value as an
undercover agent ended w i t h
his appearance at t h e public
hearing, and Sheriff Amico said
groups in the forefront of rad-
ical activity in Buffalo are the
League Against War and Fasc-
ism and the local Niagra Liber-
ation Front.
Caffery said as many as 50
assistant professors and gradu-
ate instructors at the State
University of New York at Buf-
falo - University of Buffalo -
are sympathizers and partici-
pants in activities of radical
groups.
Amico urged enactment -of
new federal legislation aimed at
protecting police.

DOORS OPEN
AT
12:45
D
Monte Walsh
is what the West
was all about.
LEE
MARVIN

U

IAL 5-6290

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Pierre Boulez .......Improvisations sur
PHYLLIS MAILING, Soprano

Mallarme

INTERMISSION-

: r t : : ilYG6.2C < i'3i;i- ? ... i' ? .54'

i - .'

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