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September 13, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-13

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*Sunday, September 13, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

4Sunday, September 1 3, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Plunkett,

Indians

By The Associated Press,'
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - Stan-
ford's defense,. its back against
the wall, shanghaied Arkansas
quarterback Bill Montgomery on,
a fourth down at the Stanford
,our yesterday to lieserve a 34-28
victory. *
Stanford's Jim Plunkett befud-
dled the fourth-ranked Razor-
backs' defense with short passes
to his running backs as the In-
dians raced to a 27-0 lead midway
in the second period.
Montgomery, ineffective through
most of the first half, had rallied
the Razorbacks by turning two

fourth down plays into touch-
downs. When Arkansas tailback
Bill Burnett leaped into the end
zone midway through the fourth
period, the Razorbacks pulled to
34-28.
Less than two minutes later,
defensive end Rick Kersey recov-
ered a fumble at midfield and
Arkansas had one last chance. I
The drive reached the Stanford'
five and on fourth down and less
than two yards to go, Montgomery'
sprinted to his left, cut up field,
and was knocked down a foot
from a first down.
The Indians happily watched
the final 22 seconds tick away.

I

Plunkett connected on 14 of 30
passes during the first half, but'
was 11 for 17 at one point.
When Plunkett wasn't throw-
ing, he was handing off to 220-
pound Hillary Shockley, who
scored three touchdowns on runs
of 43. 2 and 1 yards. The Indians'-

upset
dailly
sports

Hogs
in two series of plays, Then UCLA
went from its own 37 to the end
zone where reserve back Randy
Tyler fumbled the ball.
* * *
4amecocks crocked

ot
ya
an
to

61-.I ATLANTA, Ga. - Sophomore
her touchdowns came on a 61- NIGHT EDITOR: Eddie McAshan, first black quar-
rd punt return by Eric Cross
d a 17-yard pass from Plunkett BILL ALTERMAN terback at a major college in the
id en7-yadRpas r PlukettSouth, engineered two s e c o n d
i en R half touchdown drives yesterday
Halfback Joe Orduna, back in as Georgia Tech opened its foot-
ide trumped the Husker lineup after a year's ball season with a 23-20 victory
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - San absence for knee surgery, scored over 17th ranked South Carolina.
BIMNHAAa ,Sf am t of th i tn indwns

r
I
I

Ti

r on this and that
It occurs
to-me ...
eric siegs
THAT THOSE WHO TALK so earnestly about the lack of in-
centive on a team that can't go to the Rose Bowl should
look back at what happened here 20 years ago. The 1947 Michi-
gan team went 9-0, won the conference championship and went
to the Rose Bowl. The 1948 team, which couldn't go to the
Rose Bowl, went 9-0, won the conference championship and
was ranked number one in the country.
That some coaches, including, Bo Schembechler, want
the Big Ten to allow more football tenders because of the
11th game, which starts next year.
That the Wolverines have been attracting more than their.
fair share of professional scouts.,The scouts say they like to get
a look at the players in practice situations early in the sea-
son, where they can judge a player on "the basics." Inciden-
tally, one well-known pro superscout who stopped in at prac-
tice late last month ratesDon Moorhead as one of the top- four
college quarterbacks in the country.
,That if you don'tthink Michigan State is nostalgically
looking back to their days of greater gridiron glory, con-
sider the lead item on one or their latest press releases. It
reads: "Michigan State's 28-game football winning streak
of 1950-53 was the 10th longestin the first 100 years of-the
sport.
That Michigan's high spot in the preseason polls doesn't
leave Schembechler especially enthusiastic, nor especially cold.
"The polls probably mean more to the players than they do to,
me," he says. "'I've been looking at polls for 17 years and I
know they don't mean much."
That Ohio State's venerable old gridiron mentor W. W.
Hayes wouldn't even mention Michigan by name when the
Buckeyes held their annual picture day last month "That
team that beat us last year should be good again this year,
too," he said. But, probably much- to Woody's chargin, the
Wolverines haven't gone away just because he ignored them
and neither has last year's 24-12 defeat.
That Dick Caldarazzo and Jerry Imsland, two members
of last year's varsity te'am, probably hold the record for the
t shortest tenure of any assistant freshman football coach in the
country. They held their .positions a little over one day, before
they quit.
That only three Michigan players have won the "Most
Valuable Player" award twice since its inception in 1926.'
Two, Ron Johnson in 17 and '68 and Tom Harmon in '39
and '40, wyre halfbacks. Ralph Heikkinen, who won it in
37 and '38, was a guard. '
That Michigan's ticket manager has nothing but praise
for students and after four hectic days of ticket distribution.
"It was the smoothest distribution since I've been here," he says,
"and the credit belongs to the students."
That, in the words of physical education instructor
supreme Wally Weber, "pound for pound" Michigan wolf-
back Frank Gusich could be the toughest player in, the
conference. Last year, Gusich, who weighs 187, amazed
people with his guts, playing the entire year with a broken
wrist. This year, he has amazed people with his tackling
-ability.
That the Big Ten, which likes to boast of its grand old
heritage, sometimes confuses tradition with intransiglence. A
case in point is the conference's persistent refusal to allow
freshman football players to report for pre-season conditioning
drills before the start of the academic term. The' conference
powers that we are so afraid of giving someone a slight ad-
vance by changing a rule that they prefer to stand pat and
leave things as they are. The joke of the whole thing is that
the freshman are used mainly to practice with the varsity, and
any advantage that would come from allowing them to report
early would be evident only in the first couple of games, which
are non-conference contests.
That if the talent-laden Michigan Basketball team can
muster half the enthusiasm of their always effervescent
coach, Johnny Orr, they might really go places. "Wouldn't
it be great," Orr speculated the other day, "if Michigan won
conference championships in football and basketball in the
same year."

I
"I

w °of one u clw.
Cunningham, running at better
than 10 yards a clip,, led third- Another Nebraska TD show-
ranked Southern California to a cased Johnny Rodgers, a 5-10'
42-21 footbal victory over Ala- sophomore, who shared a 61-yard
bama last night an'd ruined the scoring pass from Tagge, and re-
Crimson Tide's ambition of vault- peatedly showed breakaway po-
ing into the Top 10. tential.
Cunningham and a covey of It was the first meeting of the
other talented backs ripped the schools, and the game was olayed
Tide defense apart to hand Ala- before 66,103 on the new artificial
bama Coach Paul "Bear" Bryant turf of Memorial Stadium.
his third straight defeat, the first * * *
time that has happened to him
since he took over at Alabama in UCLA squeaks by
1958. CORVALLIS, Ore. - UCLAs
Quarterback Jimmy Jones, join- CORVADLItOerCA s 1
ing in U88's running, directed the Dennis Dummit overcame a
relentless attack that kept dthe stubborn Oregon State defense in
Tide off balance throughout. the second half, throwing t w o
Alabama had, defeated Southern scoring passes as UCLA won a
Cal in their only two previous Pacific-8 football opener 14-9 yes-
meetings, the last time in the 1946 terday afternoon.
Rose Bowl. UCLA drove inside Oregon
* * State's 20-yard line four times in,
Nebraska rolls the first half. But each time the
Beavers repelled the attack.
LINCOLN, Neb.-Ninth-ranked But Dummit directed a scoring
Nebraska, combing the sharp pass- drive which started after the se-
ing of quarterback Jerry Tagee cond-half kickoff at the 20-yard
with the running of a bevy of fleet, line. It took 11 plays and right
backs, overpowered Wake Forest end Bob Christiansen took it over
36-12 yesterday. in the football- on a nine-yard pass play.
opener for both teams. OSU could not get a first down ,
1'

Kevin McNamara scored t h e
touchdowns on runs of five and <
two yards, the first capping a
short 29-yard drive in the third
quarter that followed M i k e Wy-
song's 43 yard punt return.
In the drive that put Tech ahead
to stay, McAshan completed four
passes for 46 yards, the last a 20-
yard screen pass to Steve Harkey
that carrier to the Gamecock five.
Two plays later McNamara scored
with 14:09 remaining in the game.
METS KEEPS PACE

Bucs I
By The Associated Press
The Pittsburgh Pirates, with the
New York Mets ready to pass
them, clung to a ninth-inning lead
and retained their half-game edge
in the hectic National League
East race yesterday by dropping
the Chicago Cubs 5-4.
With the Mets already in the
clubhouse with a 3-0 victory over
the St. Louis Cardinals that pull-
ed them briefly even with Pitts-
burgh, the Pirates went out and
downed the Cubs in a twice rain-
delayed, nationally televised ten-
sion-packed contest.
The victory also moved the
Cubs two games back, thwarting
their 4bid to pull into a second
place tie. It also temporarily halt-
ed Ferguson Jenkins' bid for a
fourth straight 20-victory season.
Jenkins, 19-14, wasn't around
when the game was decided in the
ninth, which the Pirates entered
'leading 2-1. Consecutive homers by
Willie Stargell, his 29th, and Bob
Robertson, his 25th, brought home
three runs and made it 5-1. .

old o
But the Cubs drove out Bob1
Moose, 10-9, with two singles and
Jim Hickman's 31st homer in the
bottom of the ninth, and had the
tying run on second with one outw
before' Dave Giusti got Ernie
Banks on a pop up and struck out
Paul Popovich to end the game.
The Mets had won their seventh
game in nine outings earlier when
Jim McAndrew, 10-11; hurled a'
five-hitter to outduel Jerry Reuss.
Cleon Jones tripled in the fourth
and scored oi Donn Clendenon's
sacrifice fly, and Ken Single-
ton hit a sacrifcie fly and Tom Foli
singled for two runs in the eighth.
In other National League af-
ternoon games, Montreal nipped
Philadelphia 4-1 on two-run ho-
mers by John Bateman and Jim
Gosger and San Francisco blasted
Los Angeles 8-3 behind Willie Mc-
Covey's two-run homer and two-
runiingle.
In the American League, the
Chicago White Sox stopped Min-
nesota 5-3, Oakland n u d g e d
Kansas City 3-2, Cleveland trip-

Cu bs
ped the New York Yankees 4-3 in
11 innings and Detroit downed-
Washington 6-4.
Gail Hopkins and Syd O'Brien
hit homers and Bobby Knoop
doubled in the two decisive runs
in the eighth as the White Sox
ended Minnesota's four-game
winning streak.
Mickey Stanley bunted safely
with the bases loaded, And ano-
ther run scored on a wild throw
on the play as Detroit broke an
eighth-inning deadlock.
Visiv :::v ~_ ";?;':r;.y- ::":

Associated Press
A CLOUD of dust wasn't enough
for St. Louis' Julian Javier as
New York third baseman Tim
Foli prepares to put the tag on
him in the fourth inning of yes-
terday's game at Shea Stadium.
The Mets won 3-0 to remain
one-half game behind the Pitts-
burgh Pirates in the tight Na-
tional League East.
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I

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington

W
94
81 f
75
70.
67
West
87
8
76
56
54
52 f

L
51
64
70
70
76
77
57
65
67
88
89
93

Pct.
.648
.559
.517
.517
.479
.465
.604
.552
.531
.389
.378
.359

G

Minnesota
Oakland
California
Kansas City
Milwaukee
Chicago

-Associated Press
JEFF KINNEY (35) crunches through the Wake Forest line for
a short gain in Nebraska's season opener yesterday. The Corn-
huskers went on to trounce the Deacons 36-12.
S Cr E S '.'.*.}}r .-.s...... ... .
SCORES?:

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 5, Boston 1
Cleveland 4, New York 3, 11 inn.
Detroit 6, Washington 4
Chicago 5, Minnesota 3
Oakland 3, Kansas City 2
Milwaukee at California, inc.
Today's Games
Milwaukee at California
Oakland at Kansas City
Chicago at Minnesota
Washington at Detroit
New York at Cleveland
Boston at Baltimore
NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
13
19
19
231,
26Y,4
71
31
321/
351/2
GB
2
9

Philadelphia 66 80 .452
Montreal 63 81 .438
West
Cincinnati 93 54 .633
Los Angeles 77 67 .535
San Francisco 77 68 .531
Altanta 72 75 .489,
Houston 69 76 .476
San Diego 56 89 .386
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 4
New York 3, St. Louis 0
Atlanta 5, Houston 3
Cincinnati at San Diego, inc.
San Francisco 8, Los Angeles 3
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Montreal
St. Louis at New York
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Atlanta at Houston
Cincinnati at San Diego
Los Angeles at San Francisco

12
14
14 Y2
15
21
23
36

GRIDDE PICKINGS
* Stanford 34, Arkansas 28
Georgia Tech 23, South Carolina 20
Navy 48, Colgate 22
Army 26, Holy Cross d
Villanova 21,' Maryland 3
North Carolina 20, Kentucky 10
Virginia 7, Virginia Tech 0
Richmond 21, North Carolina State 6
Nebraska 36, Wake Forest 12
USC 42, Alabama 21
SUCLA 14, Oregon State 9
Florida 21, Duke 19
Kansas State 37, Utah State 0
Kansas 48, Washington State 31
Oklahoma 28, SMU 11
Mississippi St. 14, Oklahoma St. 13
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Florida State 9, Louisville 7"
Clemson 24, Citadel 0
West Virginia 43, William & Mary 7
Grambling 38, Morgan State 21
VMI 13, Furman 9

Slippery Rock 40, Mansfield 6
. Michigan 41, Central Michigan 0
Missouri 38, Baylor 0
Air Force 45, Idaho 7
PRO FOOTBALL EXHIBITION
Washington 17, Baltimore 14
Green Bay 34, Buffalo 0
Detroit 31, Cincinnati 14
New Orleans 20, San Diego 14
Cleveland 30, New York Giants 29
jAtlanta 20, Miami 17
St,. Louis 34, Kansas City 24

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