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September 13, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September, ;13, 1970

"age Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, September 13, 1970

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1

BO NOT HAPPY

3

LIKE MUSICAL THEATER?

Asst. director
costumer
properties
make-up'
program design

MUSKET
the all campus musical theater company
NEEDS YOU!"'

Teamgoes through final scrimmage

Light designer
set designer
set builder
stage manager
program ads

light &'sound
technician
publicity
artist
manager
(4) secretaries

distribution
communication
(2) tickets & ushers
treasurer
asst: chairman

By MORT NOVECK
The Michigan football team
held its final preseason scrim-
mage yesterday afternoon at
the stadium in preparation for
the season opener next Satur-
day against Arizona and except
for some individual bright spots
it was nothing to get aroused
about.
Unfortunately, head c o a c h
Bo Schembechler was aroused,
and it wasn't because he spot-
ted a pretty girl on the side-
lines. It was, rather, the poor
showing of his offensive unit,
which was definitely not in
peak form. Schembechler de-
clined to talk to the press, after
the workout and instead relay-
ed the message, "no comment",
through an aide.

The final score of the work-
out was 34-0, which doesn't
really sound too bad until real-
izing that the second. string
scored not at all. that the de-
fense was responsible for 6 of
the. points, and that the first
string got some of its scores be-
cause it received the ball in ex-
cellent field position.
Beginning the scrimmage
with the second string, the of-
fense had trouble moving t h e
ball until Don Moorhead and
the first string came in. They
immediately began a good drive,
but tailback Lance, Scheffler
fumbled inside the 10 to re-
turn the ball to the number two
unit. The second string in turn
lost the ball almost immed-
iately aid the first string fin-

ally got on the scoreboard as
Billy Taylor punched in f r o m
inside the one at 4:22 of t h e
first quarter.
Taylor, who was one of the
few players to have a good day,
put the front line on the board
again with a three yard carry
with :57 seconds left in the first
half.
Glenn Doughty, participating
in his first contact drill, al-
most put another score on the
board before the half ended as
he took a pitchout from Moor-
head and, reversing field sev-
eral times, put on a great exhi-
bition of, broken field running
only to be brought down as he
slowed to let his blocking form
ahead as the clock ran out.
Quarterback Moorhead was
> responsible for both second half
scores by the offense as he
scrambled two yards for the first

and passed seven yards to Bill
Beiutti, who made a fine catch
in the endzone, for the second.
Ed Moore and Mike Keller
combined for the defensive
score. Moore blocked a punt at
the 35 and Keller picked the
ball up at the 11 and scampered
in for the score. Bill Hasl tt
provided another defensive high-
light when he made the work-
out's only interception in the
fourth quarter.
Iaylor wts the leading rusher
for the offensive with 103 yards.
He was followed by Doughty,
who saw limited actidn, with 48,
and Preston Henry with 47.

Moorhead wound up with a big
zero net yards and reserve Jack
McBride rushed for a negative
23.
Billy H4arris scrimmaging for
the first time, and Mike Oldham
each had four receptions, for 44
and 43 yards respectively, but
Doughty led the receivers with
3 for 64 yards.
In all, the offense rushed for
203 yards and passed for an-
other 269.
Defensive halfback Bruce El-
liot was the only casualty in the
action"as he sustained a shoul-
der bruise, the extent of which
is not yet known.

Petitions Available---UAC Office---2nd Floor Michigan Union
DUE TUESDAY, SEPT. 15, 1970 AT 5:00 P.M.

1

95% of the Reading Population Reads Only 250 to'
300 Words Per Minute or Less

Rosewall, Roche win
in U.S. tennis semis

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DOWNTOWN
HONDA

1

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Is NoDifficult to Learn
Those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Tower
Hotel achieved speeds of 800 to 2000 w.p.m. with the same or
increased comprehension they hard at their slower reading rates.1

I

I

I

I1

USEE HOW EASILY YOU AN:
-save hours, use your time more
efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster
than you do now
-improve your comprehension and
increase your enjoyment of
reading material

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8
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CYCLES * PARTS * ACCESSORIES

softballer in an age of blasting
power, checked John Newcombe's
big guns with finesse and blew
t h e second -,seeded Wimbledon V
champion off the ,enter court in
86 minutes 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.
Then Roche; 25,} using a whirl-
wind left-handed attack, shatter-
ed the last American h o p e by
crushing the aggressive Cliff Ri-
chey of San Angelo, Tex., 6-2, 7-6
6-
Rosewall and Roche will met for
the title today and the $20,000
first prize.
It is the ninth all-Australian fi-
nal in 15 years. ,,Rosewall returns
to the center court *here he start-
ed this Aussie monopoly in 1956 --
14 years ago - by beating Lew
Hoad in the final.
Australia is also heavily favor-
ed in the women's division where
Margaret Court ,seeking a tennis
grand slam, defends her crown
against Rosemary Casals ofSan
Francisco.
Today's finals will be nation-
ally televised by CBS, 3:30-5:30
p.m. EDT.
Rosewall was the darling of the
sellout crowd of 14,481 at t h e
West Side Tennis Club as he
chopped down the 6-foot-1, hard-
hitting Newcombe.
Afterward in answer tdl a ques-
~tion, Rosewall said: I, think the
Ken Rosewall of today c o u ld
beat the Ken Rosewall of 14 years
ago. It's, not. easy, to give away
so many years. to 'younger play-
ers. When you get as old as' -I am,
you have to use other ways."
.Rosewall broke Newcombe four
times - in the eighth game of the
first set, in the third gameof the
second and in the first and list
game of the thid. He finished off
the match with a beautiful fore-
hand cross-court placement.

at a cost less than HALF that of other commercial
reading courses offered in this area!
Bring a book to a free, live demonstration of the reading skills which will be
taught in a GUARANTEED course offered this semester.
Demonstrations this week-Tues., Wed.,Thurs., Sept. 15,16,17
7:30 P.M.{
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So.
Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

I

310 E. Washington

Ann Arbor

i

I

'I

a sound investment for
people who count
perfection first!
TEAC A-7030 U
STEREO TAPE DECK $74950
101 INCH REELS ... HALF TRACK STEREO ... 15 IPS
There's only one way to buy a Stereo Tape Deck. Play it by
ear. The TEAC A-7030 U rises to this challenge as nothing
ever has at anywhere near its price. Incomparable excellence
of performance is assured by a host of features. A Symmetri-
cal Control System provides positive operation with foolproof
tape control. Newly designed motors (2 new eddy current
outer rotor motors for reel drive and a 2-speed hysteresis
synchronomous motor for capstan drive) assure completely
stable tape travel and accurate tape speeds. 15 and 7/2 ips
speed, 112 track record, 1/2 and %4 track playback, 3-stage
direct-coupled amplifiers, large VU meters, 100 kHz oscilla-
tor . . . everything for minimal wow and flutter, optimum
frequency response, dynamic range, highest signal-to-noise
ratio. If you're a stereo sophisticate, you'll enjoy an audition.

Ann Arbor Tae Kwon Do Association
CO-EDUCATIONAL'
TAE KWON DO
(KARATE)

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4

Demonstrations and Trainings
MONDAY, SEPT. 14, 7 P.M.-Bursley Dining Hall
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 17, 7 P.M.-East Quad, Room 126
THURSDAY, SEPT. 17, 7 P.M.-Markley Dining Hall
BE READY TO TRAIN AFTER THE DEMONSTRATION
Training Schedule:
BURSLEY-Monday, Wednesday, Sunday-7 P.M.
EAST QUAD-Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday-7 P.M.
MARKLEY-Tuesday and Thursday-7 P.M.
SOUTH QUAD-Tuesday and Thursday-7 P.M.
INFORMATION-769-4619

CHANGING
LIFE STYLES

HI-FI

BUYS

Ann Arbor-East Lansing

618 S. Main

Phone 769-4700

"Quality Sound Throuqh Quality Equipment"

SEPT. 20
PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS and the
SACRED
TED KACHEL-Office of
Religious Affairs
SEPT. 27
THE COUNTERCULTURE
HERB BRINKS-Grad
BOB HAUERT-Office of
Religious Affairs
OCT. 10-11
FALL RETREAT: Biblical Views of
Masculinity, Femininity, Sex
Roles, and the Family
REV. MELVIN HUGEN-Calvin
Seminary

*

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS PRESENT:
'':":"'FLenor
(Candi
Rep."
:i iU

date for U.S. Senate)

r *

AND

OCT. 18
WOMEN IN SOCIETY
OCT. 25
WOMEN IN THE CHURCH
NOV. 8
HOMOSEXUALITY
NOV. 22
GAY LIBERATION
DEC. 13
CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT
SERVICE
COME PARTICIPATE LEARN
7:15 Sunday Evenings
FOREST at WASHTENAW

Bay Snit

AT

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