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September 13, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1970,

Sunday,; September 13,.'

t.

Page Eight THE MICHiGAN DAILY Sunday, September 1 3, 1970~.

Two fires
stri ke
'U'area
Two fires broke out in the cam-
pus area last night, one near the
new Harlan Hatcher Library, and
the other next to the Bell Tower
Inn, on Thayer St. across from
Hill Aud..,
The fires were quickly extin-
guished by the city Fire Depart-
ment,'
According to Paul Wenk, Bat-
talion Chief of Fire Department,
the fire at the library seemed to
be "spontaneous combustion" of
piled trash near the building. The
trash included insulation, painting
rags and cans, and other discard-
ed material left by workers finish-
ing the building's new addition.
Fire Marshall John R. W i 1 -,
liams said that he did not know
the cause of ,,the fire near the
Bell Tower Inn, and he added that
it did "very little, if any, damage."
Thirty people' gathered att the i
Hatcher library to watch the fire
department extinguish the flames.
"There were huge flames, ten
feet high!" said one spectator. "It
freaked me out. I haven't been'so
hot in a long time."

INVESTMENTS RISE:
American presence in Congo
mushrooms in last 10 years

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AVOID AN "UGLI" MESS
Learn to use our Library System
Programs ore designed to acquaint you with SOCIAL and
NATURAL SCIENCE resources in the Undergraduate Library,
MONDAY, September 14 at 7:30 P.M.
TUESDAY, Sept. 15 at 3:10 P.M. and 1:30 P.M.
All Programs in the UGLI Multipurpose Room

.. . . . ...

-Associated Press,
WO1iEN AND CHILDREN, among the first to be released by
Arab guerrillas who hi-jacked four aircraft this 'week, file' past
a guard at an airport in Nicosia, Cyprus. Their hijacked plane,
along with two others that were hijacked. were blown up yester-
day after all of the passengers had been removed.
Guerrillas ,blast plane;

KINSHASA, The Congo (/P)-
Ten years ago the American
presence here was a 12-man
consulate and a few tourists
with distinctive accents. U. -S.
investment amounts to about
$25 million.
Today the American com-
niunity exceeds 2,000 and U.S.
investment is around $250 mil-
lion. And it may double within
a year. American sources say.
Investment was long held off
by the chaos after independence
in 1960, but since' President Mo-
butu took power in 1965 the
Congo seems to have gotten
over its growing pains.
An official bill of health ap-
pears to have been given when
Mobutu visited the United States
in July, won praise from Pres-
ident Nixon, and met U.S. money
men face to face.
The immediate result tw a s
Kaiser Aluminum's $200-million
investment in a smelter and
Goodyear's decision to put' $16
million into a tire factory and
rubber plantations.
The First National City Bank
of New York plans a branch
here. It is the first America
bank to have one, although
Bank of America has a share
in a Congolese bank.
Other investment probablies are
Union Carbide, in a zinc mine,
Morrison-Knudsen in construc-
tion, and almost inevitably, Amer-
ican oilmen.
Gulf Oil is prospecting the
Congo's short offshore and a strike
could mean a deal with the Kin-
shasa government involving mil-
lions. Gulf already has a good
well in neighboring Cabinda. Mo-
bile Oil with Shell'and Petrofina,
is prospecting the Congo onshore.
Also in this probable bracket
is a tin and copper mining opera-

and because U.S, aid tied to trade
sent Congolese money elsewhere
when it could.
Last year U.S. exports to the
Congo amounted to $44 million.
They are expected to top $50
million this year. U.S. economic
officials here talk of an almost
untapped sales market in the
mining, metallurgical, trans-
port, agricultural and tourist
industries.
The reasons for this upsurge
of American interest here are
several. The most important is
a view that "the troubles" are
over. Also, under one-year-old
legislation, attractive tax-free
holidays are provided new in-
vestors. plus full repatriation of
profits.
Washington has put some-
thing like half a billion dollars
worth of aid into this country
and seems to be ready to get
some of its money back.
Last year $ptal U.S. investment
in Africa stood at $2.7 billions Of
this 56 per cent. was in oil, much
of that in Libya, and nearly $1
billion of the total was in white
South Africa.
In the light of that, $500 mil-
lion worth of investment here
would take on significant propor-
tions. Some businessmen are call-
ing this country America's bridge-
head in Black Africa.

\L

J

Gen. Mobutu

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leaders ,condemn act
DAILY OFFICIAL

tion pioposed by the Leon )Tem-
plesman organization of New
York.
Henry Ford II was here earl-
ier this year and looked into
the feasibility of an assembly
plant. Any automobile manu-
facturer here could count on a
protective tariff. About 60,-
000 new-car registrations were
recorded in the capital last year.
U.S.-Congo trade is on the rise
after spending years in the
troughs because of import quotas

" ,"

*. .. ,# 0
'E

(Continued from Page 1)

BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Group I: September 21-23: appoint-
ments made in appropriate dept. office.
Group II: .Sept. 21: appointments
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Group III: September 22: appoint-
ments made at 1223 Angell Hall..
Group IV: September 23: appoint-
ments made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Students who do not make appoint-
ment during scheduled per. have to
wait until Sept. 23.
Students on BGS, Lib. Studies and
individual concentration turn in ma-
terials on Sept. 28 to 1223 Angell Hall.,
Students with less than 55 hours at
end of current term follow appt, pro-
ced. arranged by Freshman-Soph.,
Counseling Office, 1213 A.H. All 'Hon-
ors prog. students disregard these pro-
pedures and make advance classifica-
tion appointments in 1210 A.H.
ORGANIZATION
NOT CES
Graduate Outing Club: Sunday, Sept.
Agenda: Hiking and Swimming, 1:30
Huron Street entrance to Rackhant.
Attention: Student Organizations:
The student Government Council Reg-
ulations concerning student organiza-
tions stipulates that an organization
must register their organization within
the first three weeks of the term to
maintain recognition status. You can
register your organization in 1011 SAH
by September 25, 1970. Phone 764-7416
Steak and Eggs
for $1.20
AT
CAMPUS GRILL
RESTAURANT
808 S. State St.

dynamite in the plane," Werder
said. "Then they .moved us about
10 city blocks away from the air-
craft. There was a terrible explo-
sion, a great flash and then bil-
lows of black smoke."
A front spokesman declined to
give a breakdown on the national-
ities of the men still held, but he
said some crew members of the,
three planes were among them.
"We consider the hostages as
prisoners of war and will continue
to hold them indefinitely as long
as we do not get what we want,"
he said.
In Zurich, a Swiss spokesman!
said destruction of the three
planes violated the conditions un-.
der which that government was
prepared to release three terrorists
convicted 'of a machine-gun attack
on an Israeli! airliner last rear.
He said the Swiss were "no longer
bound to the terms of our offer."
Smoke billowed from the wreck-
age for hours after the explosions
went off. As guerrillas and the
Jordanian army departed from the
area, onlookers began sifting
through the debris for souvenirs
and salvagable equipment. A truck
driver tried to pry off the front
tires from ,what was left of the
TWA Je.!
Haircuts that
don't look
like haircuts
TRY US-
DASCOLA
UM BARBERS
-3

A stiff desert breeze sent flight
maps, magazines and other debris
along the brown salt flats. The
wreckage was spread over an area
half a mile long by 500 yards wide.
There were 429 persons, includ-
ing crewmen and about eight hi-
jackers, aboard the three planes
when they landed at the guerrila-
held airstrip 45 miles north of
Amman.
About 120 women and children
were released fromnthe TWA and
Swissair planes Monday. After the
C10 was hijacked to the base Wed-
nesday.

i
r

LUNCHEON DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 12:00 Noon
at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER, 603 E. Madison

fg
Synchronized Swimming
MASS ,.MEETING
Wednesday, S 1 6
7 p.m. -Women's Pool,
Be ready to swim

In case we haven't met, allow us to
introduce ourselves. We're Ann
Arbor's most complete source of
reading materials' of all'types in-
cluding Cliff's Notes, study guides,
College dutline Series, paperbacks,
hard covers, magazines, locaj and.
out of town newspapers etc., etc.
Over 50,000 books to choose from.
OPEN 7 DAYS

c

TOPIC: "Tue Middle East Conflict"
SPEAKER: Dr. George Mendenhall
Prof. of Near Eastern Studiees

LITTLE
PRFSSR
eOQK CNTER,

For Reservations;
Call 662-5529

Sponsored y:
The Ecumenical
Campus Center

---..- - _
There will be a meeting for the formation of the
Office of Student Organization Policy Committee's
Search Committee for a
WOMAN'S ORGANIZATION ADVOCATE
on TUESDAY, September 15, 12:00 Noon at
Third floor of Student Activities Building (SAB)
Representatives of all woman's organizations are invited to
attend. For further information, call Susan Allan at 763-3548
or 761-6557.

369 NORTH MAPLE,- MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTERt
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
{.

I

Now

I n

Ann

Arbor

I

PETITIONING NOW OPEN

FOR

Two Student Government Council vacancies
(MEMBER-AT-LARGE SEATS)
AH five student positions on the Office
of Student Services, Policy Board
Two vacancies on the Bookstore Policy
('U' STORE BOARD OF DIRECTORS)

A SANDWICH THAT'S

FILL OUT PETITIONS and SIGN UP FOR
INTERVIEWS at 1546 Student Activities Bldg.
Students from all schools and colleges, graduates and undergraduates are
urged to petition.

"AS

BIG

AS

ITS

NAME"

I

-MENU-

ionday isENACTS
Legislation and nvironment Cotrol Day

STUDENT

"JUMBO" STEAK HOAGIE . ... $1.10
CHEESE STEAK HOAGIE . . ...$1.15
Regular Submarine . .... . $1.00
Three Ring Submarine . . . . $1.15

ALL PINTS
Cole Slaw . . ..55
Potato Salad ...55
Bean Salad . . .55
Macaroni...55
Corn Relish'. .75

French Fries .30
HOMEMADE
Onion Rings ..55
Milk . ..*...15
Ice Tea ... .15
Coffee ....15
Pepsi.....15

MIXER
Sunday, Sept. 13
7,30 P.M.
FRIEND)S FUN' SNACKS

Lenore

Romney

and Rep. flay Smit
ARE COMING V

-HOURS-

Service at 6 P.M.

7 Davs

a Week

:. ..:i s ~ . .::;.:. ~iG;;" .i:" . :i'' M :::::~'::i:: ?r:".. ', :s

I

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