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January 14, 1971 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-14

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y 14, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

y _i

Agoinst
The Wal

. I

Mahovlich sent to.

Page::ev

Habs

for Redmond, two others

Jim Ryun . .
. the king comes back
J. MICHAEL KEVRA
JIM RYUN is coming back.
After 18 months of self-imposed ostracism from track and
field. the triple world recordholder from Kansas is returning to
the world of the living on January 22nd, when he will compete
in the one mile run at the San Francisco Examiner Games.
Ryun began his isolation in July, 1969 when he trotted off
of the track during the mile run at a Miami AAU meet after
running only a quarter of the distance. He finally felt that the
problems and pressures of amateur track and field were no
longer worth the rewards.
In a press conference after walking off the track, Ryun
exlained his lack of motivation. "It's staleness," he com-
nerited, "when you start to see guys pull away and there's
no competitive response. Too much competition. Too many
races. Too much pressure. The Jim Ryun of a few years
a4o is dead as of today. There has to be a new Jim Ryun.
I have to exemplify my new self instead of my old one. I
am anxious to compete. But I have to realize that I can't
control races like before. What happened out there today
was more mental than physical. If I don't get over this
pressure I put on myself, the fear of losing, I may never
step out on a track again."
Ryun's admission of mental pressures was the heart of the
matter. For the previous few years, he had been the hottest
thing in track and field. A track meet wasn't really considered
a 'big' meet unless Ryun was entered in at least the mile and
the half mile, The pressure on him to produce was intense. Fans
who paid their money to see the Kansas thinclad weren't satis-
fied with a mere victory; it was the time that was important.
At minimum, the fans wanted a sub-four minute mile. Most
fans were hoping to see him set some kind of a record, and if
Ryun didn't produce, the fans often let their feelings be known.
It took Ryun more than a year to conquer his "fear of los-
ing" but last November, he finally felt he was ready to begin
his training again. He took up his usual training program: 10-15
miles of distance work every day, wind sprints, a number of
sub-60 second quarter miles, followed by more distance work.
On a good day, Ryun covers at least 30 miles.
The Kansas thinclad began his meteoric,rise to fame in
1964 at the Compton Invitational Track Meet in Los An-
geles, California. Ryun finished eighth, next to last, in the
prestigious event but sped the distance in 3:59.0, only three
seconds behind the winner, Dyrol Burleson of Iregon. What
was even more remarkable, however, was that Ryun was
only 17 years old at the time and a junior at Wichita East
High School. His run marked the first time a high school
student broke the four minute barrier in the mile.
It was ohly a matter of time before other records began to
fall before Ryun's flashing feet. In June of 1966 after his fresh-
man year at the University of Kansas, he came within a tenth
of a second of Michel Jazy's world record in the mile as he
streaked to a 3:53.7 clocking. After his exceptional peformance,
s the confident Ryun commented. "I thought I'd done about 3:56.
I felt so strong at the end, That really ticks me off. If I'd missed
by half a second, well, that might have been all right. But to
come so close and not even know I was doing it."'
Only a month later, Ryun blistered 2.3 seconds off Jazy's
mark to become the first American in over thirty years to hold
the world record in the mile. His splits of 57.9; 57.6; 59.8; 56.0
" added up to a 3:1.3 clocking. Still, however, Ryun was not
satisfied. "I feel I could have run even faster," he commented.
"When I win, I always feel as if I could have run faster.
A week earlier, Ryun had set the world record in the 880-
yard run although it took about two years for his work to be-
come official.
The next summr, Ryun was practically unbeatable. In
* June, he nicked another two-tenths of a second off his own
mile record. But the run was even more surprising as Ryun
was not pressed late in the race and won by over 40 yards.
He sprinted the last quarter mile in an amazing 53.5 seconds.
Two weeks later, the 1500 meter record became Ryun's as he
took 2.5 seconds off Australian Herb Elliot's mark to lower
the record to 3:31.1.
Ryun called this mark "even a better record than the
mile: This mark will be even harder to beat."
The years of 1966 and 1967 were good ones for Ryun. Record
after record fell and victories piled upon victories. But 1968
proved to be the beginning of the end. Injuries started to come;
a mononeucleosis attack felled him for a few months. At the
Olympics, in a race Ryun wanted more than any race in his
life, he finished a distant second to Kip Kenio as his famous kick
failed him.
The next year was even worse as a new group of milers led
by Villanova's Marty Liquori proved that Ryun could be beaten.
Four times during the year, Ryun walked off the track during a
race, the last time in Miami when he finally hung up his spikes.
And now, Ryun is starting his comeback.
Ryun scheduled a press conference after he announced
his entry to the Examiner meet. There, he announced that
he really didn't know what kind of performance to expect.

"I don't think if I do poorly in one meet," he said,'"I would
give up entirely. I think I would have to judge my perform-
ance over a few meets to see how I am really doing. But,
physically speaking, I feel I'm in great shape. My training
has been really coming along. But, I'll really have to wait
and see how I do in a meet."
For Ryun, it's just a matter of tuning up for the meet
and waiting out the next eight days. And however long these
days seem to Ryun's fans, they will probably seem like an
eternity to him as he sees if he can make a comeback.
Join The Daily
FU

DETROIT (A) - The Detroit
Red Wings of the National
Hockey League traded 14-year
veteran left wing Frank Ma-
hovlich to the Montreal Cana-
diens yesterday for right wings
Mickey Redmond and Bill Col-
Uns and left wing Guy Charron.
"It's time to start rebuilding.,"
Coach Doug Barkley, himself
Iappointed only last week, said
of the trade. "It is definitely a
move in the right direction and
a big step in our reconstruction
program."
Both Redmond, 23, and Cola
lins, 27, are in their fourth sea-
son in the NHL, While Charron,
22, is only in his second year
as a pro.
Charron who comes from the
Montreal Voyageurs of the
American Hockey L e a g u e,
played 15 games this year with
the Canadiens.
Mahovlich, 33, formerly of
the Toronto Maple Leafs, came
to Detroit in a trade in 1968.
He now joins his younger
brother, Pete, with the Cana-
diens.
In 35 games this year Frank
has 14 goals and 1,8 assists for
32 points. Redmond has 30
points on 14,goals and 16 assists
and Collins six goals and two
assists for eight points, both .in
40 games with Montreal.
dailv
sports
k! NIGHT EDITOR :
i RICK CORNFELD

Barkley, who replaced Ned
Harkness as coach last week fol-
lowing Harkness' promotion to
general manager, said the trade
would "help us immediately."
"When a club is lucky enough
to get three players of this cali-
oer," Barkley said, "it must
give up. something good. "I
Igree with Mr. Norris owner
Bruce Norris) and Mr. Hark-
ness that now is the time to
start rebuilding."
The three players' acquisition,

he said. "could very well put us
in the playoffs, which are not
out of reach yet."
This move was the first major
one for the Wings' new general
manager Harkness since his ap-'
pointment to that post after the
resignation of former general
manager Sid Abel.
Barkley, who came to the Red
Wings after serving as coach of{
the Fort Worth club, has a 1-1}
record and will get a chance to
use his new hands tonight against
Pittsburgh.

Dolphins
shatter
slow down
By the Associa ed Press
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Man-
hattan tried to upset seventh-
ranked Jacksonville with a slow-
down last night but the Dolphins,
behind Artis Gilmore easily beat
the Jaspers 67-40.
With the purpose of offsetting
Jacksonville's pair of seven-foot-
ers. Manhattan Jaspers used
clever ball handling and a sharp
passing attack in a keep-away
game.
They didn't attempt a field goal
in the first eight minutes and
tried only 23 in the entire game.
Jacksonville's 7-foot-2 Gilmore
blocked six of them.
Penn tops St. Joe

,:1

caroms key Rockets

By JOHN PAPANEK
Special To The Daily
TOLEDO-Michigan's freshman
basketball squad dropped its third
game in four starts last night to
Toledo's frosh five, 88-78.
The key factors that propelled
the Rockets past the Wolverines
were complete domination of the
boards and a well balanced scor-
ing attack.
Behind most of the game and
at half-time 48-40, Michigan put
on a surge to come within one
point with 10 minutes left in the
contest, but a quick Toledo spurt
finished the Wolverines off and
they never threatened again.
John Bridges pumped in 24
points on 11 of 19 from the floor.
mostly long-range bombs, for the
bright spot in Michigan's loss.
Bridges sparked the second half
comeback with 15 of his total in:
the second stanza.
Terry Tyler added 14 while John

PHILADELPHIA-Penn's Dave
Lonchar and Dave Clancy both. Wohl and Steve Bilsky held in
hit double figures with 11 and .10 check through most of the game,
points, respectively, rescued Pennsylvania last night as
Lonchar pulled down 12 caroms, the fourth-ranked Quakers held
but the Wolverines were com- 2offcross-town rival St. Joseph's'
pletely outplayed under the basket 62-58 in the second game of a col-
losing in the rebounding depart- lege basketball doubleheader.
ment 66-35 In the first game, 15th ranked:
Toledo was paced by Mike;IVillanova scored the first seven
Parker with 24 points and 15 re- points and went on to clobber De-
bounds as all five starters hit Paul 99-59.
double figures for the Rockets. The Quakers, now unbeaten
Bob Repp, 6-7, led both1squads1gpaes, saw a 12-poit
in snagging loose balls off the more Mike Moody led a second-
hackbord .mulling dywn 17 and- -

A joyful dive
Center Phil Goyette of the Buffalo Sabres sprawls on the ice
after scoring in the first period against Chicago in a National
Hockey League game last night. The Black Hawks came back to
win, 4-2. Number 11 for Buffalo in the background is fabled
rookie Gil Perrault.

BOWLING

Poi se, strength mark
freshmen grapplers

uktumUsa , ulinp g Us11 A. a.
scoring 13 points as well.
Steve Berce was on target for
14 and Bob Conroy and Arnie!
Phillips finished out the starting
line-up with 13 and 12 point per-
formances.
Michigan sorely missed its high
scorer, Mike Weaver, who becameI
academically ineligible at the end
of last term.
Neither team looked very im-
pressive last night, but the Wol-
verines looked especially bad ex-
cept for Bridges' performance.
College Basketball
Villanova 99, De Paul 59
Union College, N.Y. 66, King's Point,
N.Y. 59
Hofstra 71, Iona'61
Virginia 86, Wake Forest 81
Duquesne 111, St. Francis, Pa., 71
Kent St. 78, Ohio University 68
Jacksonville 67, Manhattan 40
So. Methodist 92, McMurry, Tex, 75
Bradley 88, Drake 85
Niagara 88, Fairfield 74
Tulane 88, Florida State 69
Norfolk St. 111, Hampton Inst. 106
Columbia 80, Georgetown, D.C. 68
Miami, Ohio 61, Western Mich. 57
Ohio St. 83, W. Virginia 74
Kentucky St. 131, Knoxville 90
Murray, Ky. 90, Oral Roberts 89
Toledo 71, Marshall 69I
Penn 62, St. Joseph's Pa. 58
Louisville 73, Dayton 68

half surge.
OSU rolls
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - The
Ohio State Buckeyes -put on a
burst of power in the final four
minutes here last night and hand-
ed West Virginia University an
83-74 loss and dealt the Moun-
taineers their fifth consecutive
defeat.

Free Exhibition
"BUZZ FAZIO"
Wednesday, Jan. 20
1-3 & 6-8 P.M.

{

Mixed Leagues
Forming NOW
SIGN-UP UNION LANES
REDUCED RATES
9 A.M.-Noon
Mon. -Sot.

By TIM OBOJSKI

Owings was declared the winner

j
t
jE
I
I
S
i t
I

on a r'eferee's decision. Included
If none of the signs are deceiv-
ing, this is an auspicious year for in Hubbard's five victories was an
Michigan wrestling. Now that the 8-3 rout of defending Big Ten,
harvest immediately past has had Champion John Abajace of Mich-
time to be examined, Coach Rick igan State her freshmen who
'Bay hTh ftwodotherofreshmen who
'Bay has found it to be "the best have seen varsity action are 134
freshman crop since I've been lb. Rick Neff and 167 lb. Bob
here." Huizenga. Neff, "a very methodi-
Merely a stroke of good fortune cal, heady wrestler," is a former
it was not. Bay and his assistant, Virginia State champion f r o m
Bill Johannesen, have thoroughly Granby High School.
scoured the countryside of late. Huizenga, "a very unorthodox:
Another reason for the influx of wrestler who frustrates his op-
freshmen is the new Big Ten rule ponents with his style," reached
which allows freshmen to wrestle the New York state tournament
at the varsity level. This past year last year. Both of them had their
was the first full year that t h i s collegiate mat debuts against
rule was in effect and the Wol- Purdue, and both won.
verines have made good use of it. Bay commented, "The fact thatj
The most notable of the fresh- we can wrestle four freshmen andI
men group are Jerry Hubbard and win is evidence of our toughness.
'Walt' Sexton. Both of them are re-I We should be even tougher in the
markably poised - each began his future."
collegiate career by winning a Other freshmen on the young
crucial match in the narrow vic- fsquad include former Michigan
tory over perennial Eastern power state champions Gary Ernst, Bill
Navy. Davids, and Rick Stewart; B o b
Since then, Sexton has gone on Strieter, who finished third in the
to post two additional dual meet Michigan state tournament, Jeff
victories and is undefeated in dual Bousley, a Michigan state finalist,
meet competition. The 190 lb. and Bob Meyer, who finished third
former national prep school chan- in the Ohio State tournament.
pion from New York Military
Academy in Cornwall-on-the-
Hudson has "great strength, aHd
good sense of balance, and quick- INfH Sta nding
Ionennrdin fn Ba

APPLICATIONS NOW BEING TAKEN
TO FI LL ONE VACANCY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
MEMBER-AT-LARGE SEAT r
AND
3 STUDENT OPENINGS ON
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
(Proposes conduct regulations & considers policies
concerning police on campus)
Pick up applications & sign up for interviews at 1546 SAB
STUDENTS FROM ALL SCHOOLS & COLLEGES ARE URGED TO APPLY

WED.
JAN.. 13
8 P.M.

aI P

gM-Ifrioitan

43att

THURS.
JAN. 14
8 P.M.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS B UILDING, 420 MAYNARD STREET

..---",

(

Fl61. tu uulg L y. i
Sexton also excels on the grid-
iron, and may be given the dif-
ficult task of replacing graduating
middle guard Henry Hill.
Hubbard, a former Illinois state
champion from Joliet, has a 2-1
dual meet record and is "extreme-
ly quick and deceptively strong."
The week previous to his o n 1 y
dual meet setback, at Purdue, Hub-
bard finished fourth at 150 lbs. in
the gruelling Midwest Open.
His only losses came to I o w a
State's Dan Gable, regarded by
Bay as "the greatest collegiate
style wrestler in ,the nation," and
Oregon State's Larry Owings who,
in last year's NCAA finals, became
the first to defeat Gable in col-
legiate competition.
Actually, Hubbard battled
Owintgs to a 6-6 standoff, but

New York
Boston
Montreal
Toronto
Vancouver
Detroit
Buffalo
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelph
Minnesota
Pittsburgh
Los Angele
California

East Division
W L T
29 7 6
29 7 5
19 13 8
20 19 3
14 24 4
13 23 4
8 25 7
West Division
28 8 5
19 10 12
as 15 19 6
14 19 8
11 20 11
is 11 21 8

Pts. GF
64 142
63 195
46 139
43 145
32 116
30 115
23 87:

GA
88
108
110
118
152
164
155
92
102
114
113
123
146

61
s0
36
36
32
30

151
114
99
88
116
117

12 27 3 104 151

Yesterday's Results
California 1, Toronto 1
Chicago 4, Buffalo 2
Pittsburgh 4, Los Angeles 2
Only gamnes scheduled.
Today's Games
Montreal at Minnesota
Toronto at Philadelphia
Los Angeles at Boston
Pittsburgh atDetroit
St. Louis at Buffalo
Only gamnes scheduled.

To Delve Into the Fascinating
and Varied Worlds of
PUBLISHING and PEOPLE
THERE IS MUCH TO BE LEARNED AND MUCH FUN TO BE HAD LEARNING

RTHER REDUCTIONS in our

For the student body:
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