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January 14, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, /'anuary 14, 1971 * I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, .anuory 14, 1971 4

Glare ofpublicity turns.
By ELLIOT LEGOW don't have any problems. As a as good on a team that's not But without Wilmore it is u
Michigan's Henry Wilmore is group, the team communicates as good; you can be a stand- likely that Michigan would1
already being acknowledged. as well with each other." out only because of the other currently 7-4 on the season a
one of the nation's finest basket- Wilmore realizes that a lot is guys. If one's lacking in some looking forward with reason
ball prospects, but if he had it expected out of this year's crop skill, the others try to help him a high Big Ten finish. He lea
his way he would remain un- of sophomores that they're ex- out." This confirms his basic the team in all offensive cal
known. The sophomore forward pected to "bring back basket- theory of the game, that "if gories except for assists and h
has made a name for himself ball at Michigan," and he be- anything, is to come out of us already broken one record w'
against Kentucky and Wisconsin lieves that the team "can be as we've got to be sharing our his 44-point outpouring in W
in the first half of his first var- good as we want to be." But he abilities." consin's Field House and m
sity season. refuses to make any predictions. Despite his disdain for personal shouldtumble in his path.
"There's an abundance of tal- fame, Wilmore has been a Wilmore is the first to ad.
But Wilmore, unlike many ent on this team. You can't set standout wherever he has play- that he hasn't played perfec
other budding stars shies away any limits on how good we can ed. this season, and says that
from publicity. A soft-spoken be." But he points out that the It took some good fortune to biggest problem has been th
New Yorker, he attributes his lack of experience hurts the get Wilmore to come to Ann Ar- he is often pitted against mi
success to luck, good. coaching, team. "Playing as sophomores is bor for he was widely sought five or six inches taller.
and teamwork, with the empha- a learning process." after. Wilmore narrowed his Actually Wilmore has the s
sis on the latter. The instruction being given final choice of colleges down to for a guard and started at gu
"There's no really important the sophomores from t h e i r Michigan, North Carolina, -and in his first few games as a fres
player on our team," W i1m o r e coaches' and their more exper- St. John's of New York, and man last season. However, coa
asserts. "All the individuals ienced teammates also rates then picked Michigan "mostly George Pomey shifted him
work together. You can't single Wilmore's praise. "We get a lot because of the people I met." forward to get him closer
out any one individual." of help from Mr. (Johnny) Orr Wilmore and his future team- the basket. Wilmore says that
Its the teamwork and the and Mr. (Fred) Snowden (Mich- mate and roommate John Lock- can play either position a1
team spirit on this year's Wol- igan coaches). They've prepared ardd Fere recruited together and would be just as happy at gua
verine squad which Wilmore us for some real hard games." struck up a strong friendship. He but will play wherever the coa
feels is responsible for the team's Wilmore also lays great stress also got to know Ernie John- es think he is of most help
new success. "We get along real on the knowledge acquired from son and Ken Brady and now the team.
well. We're all in it together; we his teammates. "You won't play rooms with all three teammates. The team is definitely Wi

Wilmoreoff

in-
be
nd
to
ads
'te-
has
ith
is-
ore
mit
tly
his
hat
en
ize
ard
sh-
ach
to
to
he
nd
rd,
ch-
to
11-

*

The other two incentives in
Wilmore's final choice of Mich-
igan were the quality of coach-
ing and the caliber of the uni-
versity's educational facilities.
"I know from Michigan's re-
putation that it had a good aca-
demic background - that was a
big 'factor." Now a radio and
television major, Wilmore val-
ues his college education, a n d
states assuredly that he "would
not drop out of college if offer-
ed the opportunity to play; pro-
fessionally."
But, he would, naturally, like
to make it to the pros some day.
"Everybody likes to better him-
self and if the chance came
along I'd take it." But his na-
tural tendency to underestimate
himself forces him to add, "I
don't know if I could make it."
For the time being, though,
Wilmore is interested in play-
ing good basketball for Michi-
gan. He succinctly evaluates the
Big Ten as "hard," and, is es-
pecially unwilling to predict his
own success in league com-
petition.
His 44 point performance in
the Big Ten opener is Wilmore's
career high, for the moment, and
lifted his season average up to
24 points per game. That effort,
too, he shrugs off as, "lucky."
Although he stands only 6-31/2
Wilmore also does a very effec-
tive job rebounding, having gar-
nered 8.4 per game to rank
second on the team.
There has been some incon-
sistency in Wilmore's perform-
ance with the varsity - in two
outings he has been held to less
than 10 points, and he has foul-
ed out of four games. Wilmore
attributes these problems to in-
experience, and says in the good
spirit of a team player that his
substitutes have played as well
as him.

m~ore's main concern and he is
careful not to say anything
which stresses his own import-
ance over that of - the team as
a whole. That kind of attitude
combined with his natural abil-
ities makes Wilmore into a win-
ner and should help to make
Michigan a winning team.

-Daly-Mort Noveck
Wilmore (25) goes up for two

"

KIRK ON BRIDGE

4

Double, double

-toil in trouble

By LEE KIRK
When your opponents get a lit-
tle over-zealous in their bidding,
there is always the temptation to
double and set the pants off them.
Sometimes, though, the double
serves no other purpose than giv-
ing the plot away before the hand
has begun to unfold.
The crass double often guides
your foe to the winning line of
play when a more mundane ap-
proach would leave him a trick
or two short. West's double in to-'
day's hand was one of those that
should have helped declarer, but
he went astray on a difficult hand,
deluded by a'gift horse that turn-
ed out to have no teeth.'

Why West chose a spade is un-'
known, as it is obvious that South
has the ace of spades. A diamond
return might have lured declarer
into an immediate finesse, and
East would have won and !return-
ed a club to set up the heart ten
for the eventual setting trick.
The spade return turned out to
be equally effective, as it present-
ed declarer with'the gift horse of
a free finesse. He let the spade
ride around to his ten and led a
small heart to dummy's queen.
Declarer then cashed dummy's
ace of clubs, discarding a dia-
mond from his own hand. West
trumped in with the ten, and East
later got his diamond k i n g to
score the setting trick.
West's double should have.
alerted declarer to the possibility
that the club eight was singleton.
If so. South should be sure he
doesn't get stuck in dummy with
noway back to his hand.
Thus, after taking the spade ten
and the heart queen, he should
ieturn to his hand to draw out

West's last trump. The safest way
back is to overtake the spade king
with the ace!
He then draws the last trump
with, the jack and leads a small
diamond to the ace. He must not
finesse, for East will then win and
lead a spade to his partner's queen
for the setting trick.
Declarer should then cash the
club ace, throwing his last spade,
and lead the diamond queen. East
can have his diamond king when
he pleases, but North-South will
have their doubled game.
Even this line of play isn't fool-
proof. If East has the spade queen
and brilliantly plays it on West's
initial spade lead, declarer will
later be stuck in dummy. He can
try to cash the club ace, or he can
give up the diamond king, but
either way, West gets the heart
ten and the contract is lost.
The best line of play is for
South to take the spade king im-
mediately, cash the heart queen,
return to his hand with the spade
ace, draw the last trump, lead to
the diamond ace, sluff the last
spade on the club ace, and then
give up the diamond. Whew!

A

N
4
The

A]
F
44
WEST
Q 9 4 2
A 10 64
10763
8

NORTH
K 8
Q83
A Q
A J 7642
EAST
A 7653
* K852
4 Q10953

Daily-Mort Noveck
HENRY WILMORE (25) takes a tip-off from a Harvard
jumper in Michigan's 100-73 Michigan Invitational first round
victory. Wilmore was voted the most valuable player in the tour-
nament, scoring 27 points against the Crimson.

SOUTH
A AJ10
V KJ9752
* J94
4 K
Both sides vulnerable
Bidding:-

Mako skil
1 Y 1

SAED
BUY
USED

1

BOOKS

I

Sonics adamant on Haywood;
S. Africa snubs Asheagain I
By The Associated Press
SEATTLE-Sam Schulman, embattled owner of the Seattle Sup-
ersonics of the National Basketball Association, said yesterday he
hadn't received any compromise offer from the league 'in the Spencer
Haywood case.
The Detroit News said yesterday the Sonics would agree to cer-
tain terms in order to keep Haywood, the American Basketball Asso-
ciation star who jumped to the Sonics. The deal reportedly would have
nmeant that Haywood sit out this year.
Schulman said in a telephone call from Los Angeles he had re-
ceived no offer of compromise from anyone and wouldn't accept the
offer outlined. He said he no longer was in the mood to compromise.
* * *

FOLLETTS
Has
Thousands
of them

i
c
2
i
f
t
t

WANT to draw, paint, dance, make
your own jewelry, play violin, viola,.
cello, bass, winds-for fun and to

secteno Standings
baeb ll dEastern Conference
Atlantic Division

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa-American black tennis star
Arthur Ashe will not be invited to take part in the 1971 South African
Open Championships in April, even though Australian Aboriginal 1
player Evonne Goolagong will participate. '
Tournament organizer Owen Williams said Wednesday that Ashe,
who was prevented from taking part in last year's tournament be-;
causce the government refused him an entry permit, "has not applied
and we do not intend inviting him at this stage."
":GIRLSi!! r
Wine and Music
Phi Rho Sigma Med Frat.
Friday, Jan. 15 9:30 P.M.
220 N. INGALLS !
(across from St. Joseph Hospital)
For More Info-76 1-6515}
11 I "Jr.'Y. . .

Ea s Sou"th Wst Nort
Pass 1 M Pass 34d
Pass 3 r Pass 4 NT
Pass 5 f Pass 5 r
Pass Pass D'ubl. All Pass
Opening lead - 8 of clubs
I reprint the bidding only be-
cause it really happened this way.
North's jump shift to three clubs
is a trifle dubious, and his Black-
wood after South's discouraging
three heart bid is the height of
optimism.
The final contract of five hearts
is not an unreasonable o n e,
though, and one can only won-
der where West unearthed h i s
double.a
West opened his singleton club
and declarer let it ride around to
his ki n g. West'sh double almost
certainly marked him with all of
the four missing trump. An im-
mediate finesse against the ten,
however, would be both foolish
and premature, and declarer, real-
izing this, laid down the heart
king.
West ducked, and after E a s t
showed out, South 1 e d a small
heart towards dummy. West rose
with the ace and returned a spade.
10%4o0ff
EVERYTHING
NOW at NOW
Student Book Service

From Wire Service Reports
NEW YORK-Former Wolverine
first baseman Bob Makoski was
selected by the San Francisco
Giants in, the first round of base-
ball's free agent draft yesterday.
Makoski, who transferred to
Port Huron Junior College was the
16th player selected in the regu-
lar phase of the draft. He hit over
.300 as a freshman last year.
The first player selected in the
draft was John David Hilton of
Perrin, Tex., taken by the San
IDiego Padres.
Among the players selected in
the secondary phase of the draft
was Archie Manning, of Missis-
sippi, taken by a Kansas City
farm team.
The secondary phase is made up
of players drafted previously but
not signed.
A total of 127 players were,
taken in the regular phase of the
draft and 145 in the secondary
phase. Philadelphia, which re-
ceived the fifth pick, passed be-
cause they said there were no
players left worth taking.
Detroit's first round pick was
James Cates, a first baseman from
Fullerton, Calif.

New Yo
Boston
Philadel
Buffalo(
Baltimor
Cincinn
'Atlanta
Clevelam
Muwaul
Detroit
Chicago
Phoenix

Central Divis n
ire 26 17 .605 -
ati 19 23 .452 64
14 32 .304 13Y.4
id 6 44 .120 23y%
Western Conference
Midwest Division
kee 35 7 .883 -
30 16 .652 7
26 18 .591 10
t ~26 21 .553 °l 11

Pacific
Los Angeles
San Francisco
San Diego
Seattle
Portland

Division
24 19
25 23
23 24
21 25
16 31_

.489
.457
.3404

1Y
3
41
10

W L Pet.
rk 32 14 .696
26 19 .578
phia 27 20 .574
12 35 .255

Today's Games
Cleveland at Detroit
New York at Phoenix
Baltimore vs. Seattle at U. of Wash.
Los Angeles vs. Cincinnati at Toronto
Philadelphia at Chicago
Portland vs. Buffalo at Rochester
Only games scheduled.

a

No

AA
East Division
W L
Virginia 32 14
Kentucky 27 19
New York 18
Carolina 19 27
Pittsburgh 19 29
Floridians 18 29
West Division
Utah 29 14
Indiana 28 15
Memphis 24 21
Denver 17 26
Texas 16 29

:GB,

Pet.
.696
.587
.429
.A13
.396
.382
.674
.651
.533
.395
.356

GB
5
12
13
14
14%.
1
14%,

U-M Barbers
8:30-5:15P.M.
Mon:-Sat.
N-M UNION

11

I

Kentucky 123, Floridians 117
only game scheduled
Today's Gamed
Kentucky at Pittsburgh
Carolina at Floridians
Memphis at Utah
Only games scheduled

95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS-
AST READING IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN!

11

-i

All those who completed courses held this
past year at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved
speeds of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same'
or increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:

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FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

1,
t"..
1
a 1
b M

Bar-B-Q -Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
n __n n I C.:

Shrimp
Scallops
rw /r/AM

" ICI11i vvIuuIV1-1' 1a 11V 1111117

E

'

I

I I

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