100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

grntrirAn%,f Am'r 12 10"71 1

.J'..JuIriIy, ^r~pii ,, i )fi

I

Chandler, Phillips highlight folk weekend

By LUKE BALDWIN
Ann Arbor is hosting two well
k n o w n singer-composers this
weekend in Len Chandler and
U. Utah Phillips (The Golden'
Voice of the Great Southwest).
Chandler, who will be play-
ing through Sunday, opened
Thursday night at Canterbury
House, playing to only a hand-
ful of people.
Chandler has retained basical-
ly the same style that brought
him to fame during the folk re-
vival of the sixties. Although
Chandler is primarily a writer
of topical songs, his music has
always conveyed a sense of op-
timism. His manner is light and
energetic.
Yet, times have changed a
great deal since Chandler wrote
tunes like "To Be A Man." His
music seemed to evoke a sense
of nostalgia.
Len began with a humorous
love song with sort of a Motown
effect to it, moving from there
to a topical song based on the
bumper sticker: "America-Love
It Or Leave It." His voice was
smooth and expressive, and his
guitar picking relatively simple,
but clean. At times his singing
and the flowing melodies of the
songs were not forceful enough
to convey the full force of the
lyrics.
Given the size of the crowd,
and my own mood that resulted
from it (I'm used to hearing
Len play to packed houses), it'
is difficult for me to evaluate
the performance. My primary
impression was that the per-
formance seemed oriented to
the present (he sang an ecology
and a Cambodian song), but
the tone was anarchonistic. I'm
sure old Chandler fans are apt
to enjoy him. I simply haven't
succeeded in preserving my
sense of optimism as well as
Chandler.
Utah (B r u c e) Phillips, ap-
pearing at the Ark, takes a
somewhat different approach to

a similar medium. He, too,
writes topical songs, but his
manner is significantly differ-
ent.
Hailing from the Southwest
and looking like a mustachioed
Will Rogers in Bill Cody's
clothes. Phillips begins one
step ahead in establishing his
format.
Bruce has written over four
hundred songs and began the
special weekend of all his own
compositions with a set about
the "Great and Sovereign State
of Utah."
Interspersing his verse num-
ber with a generous supply of
corny, western style one liners,
Phillips immediately captured
the audience. His humor served
to lead into songs about rail-
roading, cattle drives, and min-
ing.
"On the Goodnight Trail" is
a song about the cook on cattle
drives, known as the "old wo-
man." who is a cowboy no longer
to ride herd: "It's a wonder the
wind/ Don't tear off yer skin/
And get in there and blow out
the light."
Singing in a voice that bears
comparison to C i s c o Houston
(with a slightly rougher qual-
ity) Phillips sang some songs
which he admitted were not
among his best. But he had
reason to write them. "Dead
Shot Johnson" for example is a
song that is a warning to hitch-
hikers about a cop in Colorado
who has shot three "hippies."
Much of what Phillips writes
about is derived from his expe-
rience.as a railroad worker,
wrangler, and union organizer.
Instrumentally, P h i 11 i p s is
competent, t h o u g h certainly
not outstanding. There are oc-
casional instrumental breaks on
the guitar, and last night he
added the mouth harp on a
couple of numbers.
By the end of the first set
Phillips had moved from his
early humorous approach to the

things that he was really in-
terested in saying. Jesse's Cor-
rido comments on the execution
of a sixteen year old Chicano
boy, convicted of murder. Phil-
lips a d d e d, "In this country
people seem to want to bury
their mistakes rather than ad-
mit them." The final song of the
set caused Phillips to comment
on the state of corruption of
the recording industry, as it
chorused "I'm tired of your big
operators/ And I'm tired of your
music machines/ I'm tired of
singing for nickels and dimes/

When the times are always so
lean,"
I've known of Bruce Phillips'
abiilty as a songwriter for a long
time. "Rock Salt and Nails." "If
I Could Be the Rain," and sev-
eral of his other songs may one
day be classics. As a performer.
Phillips is capable of provoking
a great deal of thought with
both his conversation and nis
music. He is both lyrical and
forceful, using his humor as a
kind of comic device to make
his message effective without
being painful.

Voice of the
Great Southwest
"a walking
anthology of
-PJohnliso
N.Y. Time
SUN.
BUDDIES IN
THE SADDLE

SALE ON
SHERWOOD
PRODUCTS
at
HI FI STUDIO
121 W. WASHINGTON
For the student body:
FLAR'ES
by.
A Levi
A Farah
" Wright
Tads
Sebring
CHECK MATE

ONLY

I

"
a:
r-

SEX RITLIIS OF
FFIN
THE CCUL~T COLOR'
STRAIN THE BOUNDS OF
THE IMAGINATION
people who know no limits in a
search for erotic sexual ecstasy
-I
J.. . iII Th.7/E 7Wf ~I~
I cinema
482-3300ri.PARK1KR

BURSLEY BURLESQUE
presents
DANU"
AN ORIGINAL MUSICAL SATIRE
ABOUT UNIVERSITY LIFE
APRIL 3-4 8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION 50c
EAST BURSLEY CAFETERIA

1491 Hill MEET
TC i 51 {
iE
I WAe
XWrAVS
E
I

State Street at Liberty

*i

DAIL

Y

CLASSIFIEDS BRING RESULTS-USE THEM

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE Presents
"BLITHE SPIRIT"
Noel Coward's

434-1630
3020 Washtenaw
SHOW TIMES
TODAY AT 7 & 9 P.M.

BOX OFFICE
OPENS AT 6:45
SHOW TIMES
WED., SAT. & SUN.
1,3,5,7, & 9P.M.

A mailboy finds the
secret to success
and gives the network
brass a K ING-KONG
HEADACHE!

April 2 and3

Trueblood Theatre
8:00 P.M.

Box Office open 10 a.m.-curtain
Tickets $2-$2.50 at Stanger's or call 764-5387
I7IT~BBHY 1)OUSE1
presents
LEN CHANDLERE
Columbia Recording Artist
TONIGHT and Sunday
"fine, fine music, good and true." L.K.
"may a hundred flowers bloom." M'TT
SAT.-SUN. 330 MAYNARD ST.
APRIL 3-4 Doors Open 8:00 a
CINEMA II
"ONE-EYED JACKS"'
Marlon Brando, as Johnny Rio, seeks
revenge in the Old West
with KARL MALDEN, SLIM PICKENS, KATY JURADO
DIRECTED by MARLON BRANDO
Friday and Saturday April 2, 3
And. A., Angell Hal 7:00, 9:30 p.m.
NEXT WEEK:I
Hitchcock's "TH E 39 STEPS"
-I

SATURDAY, SUNDAY-APRIL 3, 4

''I
1

Look who's GONE BANANAS!

ORPHEUS
dir. JEAN COCTEAU (France) 1947
The mystic Cocteau has death come out of a mirror
in his surreal interpretation of the Orpheus myth.
This movie may sound heavy, but don't let that scare

WALT DISNEY
production)
THEBARE F
EXECUTIVE
KURT OE HARRY WALLY
RUSSELL' FLYNN'- MORGAN- COX
TECHNICOLOR' S c

Rolling
Stones
GODARD
Revolutionary A
People's
Benefit
April 16-18
NATURAL SCIENCE
AUDITORIUM
"VOICES"
preview tonight
ARM 761-9751

I I

you away. It's really good.
Tuesday, Wednesday--BATTLE OF ALGIERS

L
r!

..

7 & 9:05 P.M.
662-881

75c

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

IL: -. -- ...-

NOMINATED FORI
ACADEMY
AWARDS

p

BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST ACTRESS GP
BEST ACTOR
BST SUPPORTING ACTOR
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
BEST ORIGINAL MUSICAL SCORE

i
3
P
i
e
i
I
i
9 i

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayers.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
j A.L.C.-L.C.A.
j 801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Matins.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
1:00 p.m.-Free-form Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.

AliMacGraw-"RyanO'Neal
A HOWARO GMSKY ARIHUR iil RP odicW i
John Marley&Ray Milland E
8th
WEEK!

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 5-6290
Doors Open 12:
Shows at 1, 3, 5,/
Free List Suspend

WORSHIP

45
7, s9
ded

7:30 p.m.-Program: Grand Dragon
Michigan KKK.

of the

Um

WEEK!a

f

1

Thursday, April 8, 9:00 p.m.

Presbyterian Church, 1432 Washtenaw

Democracy, Dissent and Justice"
Dr. Eqbal Ahmed of the Harrisburg "SIX"
-an address and discussion of the forthcoming trial-A defendant in the trial sched-
uled to begin in October, Dr. Ahmed, a scholar from Pakistan, is a Fellow at the Adlai
Stevenson Institute of International Affairs; he has done research on the problem of de-
veloping nations, revolution, and the American military presence in Asia for many years.
- -ALSO A FILM-
THE HOLY OUTLAW-FATHER DANIEL BERRIGAN

THURSDAY
7:15 p.m.-Maundy Thursday Service-Holy
Communion.
FRIDAY
7:15 p.m. - Good Friday Service-Vespers
and Tenebrae.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCI ENTIST
1833 Wa'htenow Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a rn -Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meetina.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "Inherit the Kingdom."
4:00 p.m.-"Requiem" by Johannes Brahms
performed by the Chancel Choir.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 a.m. to noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, April 4:
5:30 p.m.---Celebration-"Jesus Christ, Su-
perstar" (beginning).
6:15 p.m.-Dinner.
7:00 p.m.-Program--"Jesus Christ, Super-
star" (conclusion).
Fridav, April 9:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, Pine Room.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Preaching:
Mr. Sanders.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.
CAMAPUS CHAPEL

UNITY OF ANN AR OR
310 S. State St
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11:00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held
at YM-YWCA, 350 South Fifth Ave.-Ron
Johnsoni
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study and Prayer Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prover
and Counseling, also, 12 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesdav, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
Daily Word, published at Unity Village, is
ova ilab le.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheins, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Services,
Communion in 2nd Service.
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.-Bible Class, "Romans."
Sunday at 3 :00 pm.-Meet at Chapel to go
to Mott Hospital for Service Project.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Supper at Chapel.
Holy Week Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.-Stu-
dent-Led Tenebrae Service, with Com-
m union.
Maundv Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-Holy Com-
munion Service.
Good Friday, 1:00 pm.-Service, ending at
1 :50.

*k

#'

i

Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Readina Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9: Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidovs.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH

I

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Erwin A. Goede Minister
Church School and Service at 10:30 a.m.--
Sermon Topic: "The Search for Scope-
goats."

li

I

I

C

[:

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan