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April 03, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-03

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U OF M ROMANCE LANGUAGES DEPT.
IONESCO'S
Le Roi Se Meurt
in French
APRIL 2nd-2 p.m. 1.50, $1.00
APRIL 2 and 2-8 p.m. $2.00, $1.50
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
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^t'"J. :i: r::}'GPr'=: :ri:"'rti :{4:;$'9::.:.. ...w.... . . . ...r.. . . . . . .:.. . . . . . . . .>;.. . . . .....
LIFE AND DEATH
a contemporary Lenten morality play
by DONALD H. POSTEMA
an original multi-media production
SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 6:30 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
662-2402
l OvER 4t
DIAL 8-6416
The 12 Chairs' is a
comedy to warm the heart
and leave the ribs ach-
ing!"
-Judith Crist, NBC
A wild and hilarious chase for a fortune in jewels
-~ Brok Ri RONOD
DOORS OPEN 12:45 Wanda Hale. New York Daily News
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M. :y .
NEXT: "GOING DOWN TIE ROAD" .
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
Dial 662-6264 Now On Our Screen!
At corper of 1:10-3:45-6:15-9 p.m.
State and Liberty Sharp!
LIT "TLI 110IG
'AS ITSNI M MOST EL TD .31 ITR
A{ P OT
DUSTiN HOITHAN "U1TLE BIG MAN

p~age three

CI P

Ski [igan~

DaNwtly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0--W
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, April 3, 1971

NIGHT EDITOR: W. E. SCHROCK

Page Three

In e wsbriefs
By The Associated Press
THE SENATE LABOR COMMITTEE approved yesterday a
bill providing the $1.5 billion in school desegregation aid money
asked by President Nixon but containing strong restrictions on its
use.
The bill is the result of a compromise between the administration
and Senate Democrats and includes some of the provisions of an
alternative bill to the Nixon proposal introduced by Sen. Walter Mon-
dale, (D-Minn.).
These include strict safeguards on the spending of the money by
local school districts, some earmarking of funds for specific purposes,
and the requirement that the federal money be used to develop qual-
ity schools and not just help with desegregation problems.
* j, *
REBEL ARMY COMMANDERS in Jessore East Pakistan saidI
Thursday Bengali freedom fighters would battle the Pakistani
army to the death but conceded their control is shaky in Jessore
and dozens of other cities in the breakaway province.
Strong West Pakistani troops are dug in outside Jessore and have
already made one attack, killing scores.
Wednesday a column of Pakistani troops destroyed rows of peasant
homes and shot anything that moved, the rebels reported. Whole fami-
lies, they claimed, were machine-gunned as they fled their burning huts.
Meanwhile, the State Department announced yesterday that the
U.S. has accepted an offer by Pakistan to evacuate Americans from
East Pakistan by Pakistani International Airlines.
A CLOSE ASSOCIATE of Israeli Premier Golda Meir declar-
ed yesterday Egyptian President Anwar Sadat's new proposal for
re-opening the Suez Canal was absurd and indicated that Israel
would reject it.
Information Minister Israel Galili said that a re-opening of the
canal would probably be accompanied by the massing of Egyptian
troops on the canal's east bank.
The Jerusalem government has said it is willing to withdraw from
the canal banks if there is peace, but not back to its old borders which
it considers insecure.
A THREE JUDGE federal court panel ruled yesterday the
constitution does not guarantee employes the right to strike and
that government workers may be barred from striking.
The United Federation of Postal Clerks had filed suit against'
Postmaster General Winton Blount contending the right to strike is
fundamental and protected by the Constitution.
The court noted that although public employes have no consti-
tutional right to strike, they maintain through Presidential order the
right to organize and bargain collectively.

Support for

;,,,
,
.

Calley

mounts

across nation

r
.
',
k'
';

fly 1ne AssoCiatea ress
Petition drives, draft board resignations and other dem-
onstrations of support for Lt. William L. Calley Jr. continued
yesterday with some appeals to President Nixon to grant him
executive clemency.
An Omaha, Neb. patrolman said he collected 500 signa-
tures on a clemency petition in one day. About 2,000 persons
staged a "sympathy march" through downtown Dallas. Mem-
bers of draft boards in Arkansas, Michigan, Florida, Wyom-
ing, Montana and Kansas resigned.
Calley, 27, convicted of the premeditated murder of at
least 22 Vietnainese civilians--- - - --

-Associated Press
Peace protest
Housewife Louise Bruyn of Newton, Mass., arrives at the Capitol
in Washington yesterday after her 44-day, 450-mile march to protest
the war in Indochina.
HOODED MEN:
Ypsilanti principal
tarred, feathered

YPSILANTI - The principal of
Willow Run High School, which
was the scene of racial incidents
last month, was tarred and fea-
thered Thursday night by a group
of hooded men who forced him
from his car at gunpoint.
State police said Wiley Brown-
lee, 42, suffered minor injuries in
the incident which occurred as
he was coming home from a
meeting of the Willow Run
School Board.
Brownlee said the hooded men
instructed him to walk to a road-
side ditch. "They rapped me on
the back of the head with a shot-

gun and I think I was not uncon-
scious, but stunned," he said.
"For a moment I thought they
wer1e going to pour gasoline on
and set fire to my car, then they
came toward me and began to
pour tar over my clothes."
"The next thing I knew, they
threw a lot of chicken feathers
on me," he said.
He told state polibe he was
convinced the assailants, who
numbered about five or six, were
adults, not high school pupils.
Asked by newsmen if he knew
any reason for the assault,
Brownlee said "My mind would
of course have to go back to the
racial tensions at the school and
the fact that the school was
closed for a couple of days last
month."
Brownlee also spoke of a
threatening card he received
from the Ku Klux Klan approxi-
mately one month ago."
"I must be doing something
they don't like," he said, shrug-
ging his tar-covered shoulders.

at My Lai on March 16, 1968,
remained under light guard in
his quarters at Ft. Benning,
Ga.
He was released from the post
stockade Thursday night, one day
after his sentence to life impris-,
onment, following Nixon's order
that the soldier be freed pending{
review of his conviction.
Among those urging Nixon to
act with caution was former U.S.
Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark. He said
the President should not grant
Calley clemency simply because of
the "emotion of t h e moment."
Clark added: "I can't judge this
particular case, but if a man kills
unarmed citizens that do not pose
a threat to him, then he would be
guilty of murder. I could see no
grounds for clemency under those
circumstances."
Several veterans stood on the
steps of the Statehouse in Provi-
dence, R.I., collecting signatures
on a petition asking Nixon to have
the sentence lifted. Allan Sartiny
of Central Falls who said he re-
turned only a month ago from
Vietnam duty said, "I killed quite
a few people over there. If Calley
is guilty, then I'm guilty too."
All five members of local board
No. 33 in Huron county, Mich. re-
signed to protest the Calley con-
viction. Board member James E.
Briggs of Bad Axe said, "Why
should I place my name on an or-
der of induction for a man who
might have to face trial for car-
rying out an order of his superior
officer?"
In Dallas, about 2,000 joined a
march organized by an insurance
man, George Hughes. Some of the
marchers carried posters reading,
"Free Lt. Calley, b o m b Hanoi."
!I

climbs 'to

six per cent

k'

WASHINGTON ) - Unem-
ployment appears to have levelled
off at an annual rate of six per
cent; but the economy itself may
be heading toward recovery, the
head of the Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics (BLS) t o 1 d Congressmen
yesterday.
This interpretation 'of official
unemployment statistics for March
was given by BLS commissioner
Geoffrey Moore before the Joint
Congressional Economic Commit-
tee. The committee called Moore
to testify after the Labor Depart-
ment last month halted regular
news briefings onunemployment
and economic figures.
The official statistics, released
by the bureau an h o ur before
Moore's appearance, showed the
jobless rate has again hit the 6
per cent mark after two months
of decline. The 6 per cent repre-
sents 5.2 million jobless men and
women, the bureau said, and is an
increase of 150,000 on an annual
basis when seasonal adjustments
are made.
Democratic National Chairman
Lawrence O'Brien said the job-
less figures are the result of the
failure of the Nixon administra-
tion's economic policies.
"They are,'' he said, 'but otne
indicator of the result of the Pres-
ident's misguided, dehumanized
approach to the economy."

Jobless rate

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SEN. GEORGE'AIKEN (R-Vt.) has joined Democratic lead-
er Mike Mansfield in backing a proposed constitutional amend- The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
ment limiting a president and vice-president to a single six-year aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
term.Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
Aiken, the dean of Senate Republicans, said yesterday he wants Michigan 48104. Published daiy Tues-
to free presidents "from the millstone of partisan politics." day through Sunday morning Univer-
"It is an indisputable fact that no president can give his best to ity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
the nation or maintain our prestige in the world as long as he is con- ISummerS ession published Tuesday
stantly being fired upon by those whose principal purpose is to keep through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
him from being re-elected," Aiken said. rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE
'BEST FOREIGN FILM'
"Incredibly sensual"-T
h: "Without ever showing all
there is to show, without
pandering to the prurient
and the obvious, 'First Love
becomes, through artistry.
and an intelligent use of
sensuality, one of the
sexiest movies in years!"
--REX REED
(Cannes Film Festival, 1970)
"An extraordinarily
beautiful film!"
-WILLIAM WOLF, Cue Magazine
"A love story that is
universal and timeless! You
will see 'First Love'...for the
beautiful performances, for
the beautiful visuality and
for the beautiful Dominique
Sanda!"
-GENE SHALIT, NBC-TV
SIDNEY GLAZIER presentsM i WINNER A
MAXIMIUAN SE SAN SEBASIAN,
LOVE ~~FILM FSIA.~
FIRST LOVE 3Y
Sat. "First Love", 3:20, 6:30, 9:40-"Quackser" 5:00, 8:10, 11:20
"One of the most delightful
comedy dramas in recent years!
Wilder's delicate blend of humor and pathos makes
the viewer think he is seeing young Charlie Chaplin!"
-Time Magazine

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FILM SOCIETY
presents
ORSON WELLES'
MR. ARKADIN
with ORSON WELLES
PATRICIA MEDINA
MICHAEL REDGRAVE

I

8:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
FRIENDS
MEETINGHOUSE
1420 Hill

7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron

8:30 p.M.
SUNDAY
FRIENDS
MEETINGHOUSE
1420 Hill

between State and Division

APRIL 2, 3, 4
Contribution $1

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FREE 1 +I preview: "VOICES"
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HELP RE-ELECT MAYOR HARRIS

GENE WILDER

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