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February 18, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

PaWe Seven

Six

demands

have an

old history

(Continued from Page 6
Recruiting
New Left activitists at colleges
around the country have been
demanding the limitation or
elimination of on-campus recruit-
ing for several years now, A't the
University, various r a d i c a 1
groups have sponsored at least
three significant drives thus far
to restrict the access of the gov-
ernment corporations from the
University's nine placement of-
fices.
The drives against recruiting
began in 1968 with initial demon-
strations which led to the estab-
lishment of a policy by the Re-
gents in April, 1968 requesting
that recruiters participate in a
public forum on their company's
policy and business practices
when students petition for such
a debate.
Last winter, SDS undertook
weekly anti-recruiter demonstra-
tions against such institutions as
Lockheed, Dow Chemical Co.,
General Electric, and the U.S.
military.
By using tactics ranging from
peaceful picketing to trashing
and disruption SDS managed to
generate a great amount of de-
bate on the recruiting issue.
While there were many civil
libertarian arguments against
their mildly destructive or dis-
ruptive tactics, much of the cam-
pus community did re-examine
their positions and SDS gained
needed support from a new,
largely faculty group called
Radical College.
Meanwhile, the University pro-
A secuted a number of the demon-
strators through both University
judiciary procedures and through
civil courts.
Last term, the Office of Stu-
dent Services (OSS) policy board
barred recruiters from corpora-
tions which operate in South
,. Africa and other countries with a
policy of racial discrimination
from using the OSS placement
services.
Child care
The Child Care Action Group
hashbeen negotiating with the
administration for almost a year
for a 'University-funded child
care center.
In efforts to implement their
plans for a center, the group has
met several times over the past
11 months with the Regents and
Fleming.,
When the group made its first
bid to the administration in
March they were referred to
then acting Vice President for
Student Affairs Barbara Newell,
who told them she had requested

Mad

Jlidn igh t

SATURDAY, February 20

STUDENTS gather in front of the Administration Bldg. on Nov. 5, 1968 as part of a Students for a

Democratic Society strike to
corporations that aid the military
space for a child care center at
University School, which is run
by the education school.
However, the group's request
for a child care center in the
school was turned down in May.
The administration cited the ren-
ovation of offices and classrooms
in the building as preventing its
use for the center.
After failing to obtain space in
University School, the group de-
cided to request space and fa-
cilities directly from the Office
of University Housing. In June,
the group met with John Feld-
kamp, director of University
housing and Paul Bowyer, super-
visor of building services. After
conducting members of the child
care group on a tour of open fa-
cilities in three residence halls,
Feldkamp offered them one of
the dorm room for a summer
center.
Later that day, the group
presented petitions to Fleming
and the Regents requested that
a more permanent facility be
found.
On July 6, a summer child
care center opened up in the
Markley dining hall. When the
fall semester opened, Markley
Dorm Council voted to retain
the center until the University
could obtain a more permanent
location.
When no University facility
for a center appeared forthcom-
ing, the child care group last
September 'arranged for an open
Regents hearing on the issue.
Citing a "tight money situa-
tion," the Regents again reject-
ed plans for a permanent Uni-
versity-funded center.
A temporary center is now
operating in three University
Terrace efficiency apartments

protest University war research
which the University is pro-
viding rent-free until April.
Course Mart
The demand for student con-
trol of the Course Mart program
arises out of the recent contro-
versy surrounding C o11e g e
Course 327, a Course Mart course
in political action.
The red tape and confusion
surrounding the issue, whether
justified or not, forced many
students to become disgruntled
with the very way the Course
Mart program is run.
The program, which was es-
tablished two years ago to pro-
vide a channel for course offer-
ings not generally found in the
regular LSA curriculum, is con-
trolled by the Course-Mart com-
mittee, a student-faculty group.
That group is itself under the
auspices of the college curricu-
lum committee, a predominantly
faculty group with three stu-
dents appointed by LSA student
government.
Proposed Course Mart courses
are first screened by the Course
Mart committee. It makes deci-
sions and grants credit to most
courses, referring to the curri-
culumycommittee only those
which it believes are of an es-
pecially complex nature.
In a series of complex de-
velopments beginning last term,
the College Course 327 (Issues,
Strategies and Analysis in Po-
litical Action) was first reject-
ed, then reviewed and given
blanket approval by the LSA
curriculum committee.
However, while granting ap-
proval, the committee warned
that it would be reviewing each
of the 15 sections separately and
that they were all subject to
deletion.

E

and on-campus recruiting by
However, acting on the rec-
ommendation of the Course
Mart committee, the curriculum
committee later approved only
nine of the 15 sections, thus
forcing the displacement of
about 80 of the 150 students en-
rolled in the course.
In subsequent action, while
the LSA executive committee
was conducting a hearing on
alleged "procedural inadequa-
cies" by the curriculum and
Course Mart committees, the
curriculum committee reversed
its earlier decision and approved
the final six sections more than
one month into the term.

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