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February 18, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 18, 1971

SIX DEMANDS PRESENTED

Alpha Delta P1
etPOPEN HOUSE
Sunday, February 21
1-3 P.M.

Protesters

or call 769-0738
722,S. Forest

it]

In
Concert

J ua
Senarra
Flamenco Guitarist

(Continued from Page 1)
presence of the Reserve Officers
Training Corps (ROTC) at the
University.
The critics say the aim of
ROTC--to train college students
for appointments as officers in
the armed forces after they
graduate-also places the Univer-
sity in a position where it is aid-
ing the U.S. military to kill. And
as to the academic content of the
ROTC curriculum, critics cite a
report by the literary college
curriculum committee stating
that ROTC course content was
"conjectural, non - analytical,
cheaply moralistic, and often
blatantly propagandistic."
Defenders of the ROTC pro-
gram say it provides future of-
ficers for the military with ex-
posure to non-military thought
and ideas. Others support it be-
cause they agree with U.S. for-
eign policy and see ROTC as
supporting American activities
abroad.
When the Regents discuss to-
day whether corporations which
have offices in countries which
allow r a c i a 1 discrimination
should 'be allowed to recruit on
campus, they will be considering
only one of several objections
raised over the past few years to
on-campus job recruiting.
Critics, which have ranged
fram Students for a Democratic
Society to the Office of Student
Services Policy Board argue that
by allowing almost any govern-
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ment agency or corporation to
use placement services free of
charge, the University tacitly
endorses the practices and poli-
cies of those institutions.
This becomes significant in
the face of charges by radical
students and faculty that s)me of
the corporations practice racism
and sexism, manufacture wea-
pons which aid the U.S. military
effort, and support imperialism
through their offices and trade in
foreign countries.
Defenders of the use of the
placement offices by these cor-
porations argue that the Univer-
sity is a "forum for the free ex-
change of ideas" and that the
University should not take sides
by allowing some corporations to
recruit on campus, and pro-
hibiting others.
However, radicals counter that
the University has already taken
a standi n support of objection-
able corporate practices by al-
lowing any institution -to use
placement facilities.
The demand for a free child
care center for children of Uni-
versity employes and students
asks the Regents to reverse a
decision made. last September
against establishment of t h e
center.
The campaign for the child
care center has been spear-
headed by women's liberation
groups, who say it is needed to
free women from having the
sole responsibility for rearing
children.
This role, the groups argue,
is perpetuated byea society
which discriminates against
women because it does not allow
them to undertake fulfilling
careers.
The groups supporting the
child-care center maintain that
the University has a responsibil-
ity to keep men and women
employes and students on an
equal footing by providing fa-
cilities to take care of their
children.
While expressing some sym-
pathy with the proposal, t h e
Regents have said they can-
not afford the costs of setting
up the center and maintaining
it free of charge..
The demand for student con-
trol of the LSA Course Mart is
an outgrowth of the recent dis-

'evive 1
{V
n
ANN ARBOR POLICE officers i
building early last year. North HI
pute over a Course Mart course
in political action.
When the Course Mart review
committee and the LSA curricu.-
lum committee voted to delete
several sections of the course,'
charges were leveled that the
deletions were pglitically moti-
vated and infriged on the aca-
demic freedom of the partici-
pants in the course. c
Both committees are composed
of students and faculty members,
and although they subsequently
voted to reinstate the sections,
students charge that the contro-
versial incident could be repeated
if students are not granted con-.
trol of the program.
They criticize control of course
offerings by faculty-dominated
committees, like the curriculum
committee, because it prevents
students from shaping courses
according to individual academic
needs, which students are most
aware of
Administrators and faculty

to

Ong-standing issues

nspect damage inside North Hall. the ROTC office and classroom building, following trashing of the
all has been the scene of many demonstrations and protests over ROTC during the last few years.

FEB. 19, 1971
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members, on the other hand, feel
that the faculty, with their great-
er academic experience, can
make the wisest determination
of curriculum and course con-
tent, and see that courses are
"rigorous."
They have expressed concern
that if the Course Mart program
were to be controlled by students,
the general academic quality of
the program would decline.
The sixth demand, that Uni-
versity facilities be turned over
to anti-war groups for organ-
izing, represents the only new
The demand stems from the
argument by radicals that if the
University does not actively take
a stand against the war', it
is actually helping support it.
Histories of the controver-
sies surrounding the first five
demands are summarized in in-
dividual sections below.
Classified research
The classified research issue
first arose in October, 1967
when The Daily revealed the
University was involved in a
variety of military-oriented pro-
jects, including a $1 million
counterinsurgency p r o j e c t in
Thailand.
Early the next month about
250 students sat in at the LSA
Bldg. demanding an end to sec-
ret research and University par-
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ticipation in the Institute for
Defense Analyses <IDA, >, non-
profit corporation to provide the
military with scientific studies
dealing with national security.
The day of the sit-in Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher appointed
a faculty commission to review
research policy. In January, 1968
the group, chaired by chemistry
Prof. Robert Elderfield, made
its report, urging a continuation
of most classified research.
The report provided that the
University not accept any con-
tract "the specific purpose of
which is to destroy human life'
or to incapacitate human be-
ings."
After adoption of the report
by Senate Assembly and subse-
quently by the Regents, a nine-
member faculty committee was
established to review proposed
classified contracts. Later three
graduate students were added,
The issue remained dormant
until last November when a new
series of articles in The Daily
showed the University had con-
tinued to engage in surveillance
and target acquisition projects
that were being used in South-
east Asia.
A debate on classified researchi
was held soon after in the
Union Ballroom between Uni-
versity researchers and repre-
sentatives* of radical groups,
with about 300people attend-
ing.
Last week, Michael Knox, a
member of the classified re-
search committee, wrote a letter
charging the University "is con-
ducting millions of dollars of re-
search to perfect weapon sys-
tems and subsystems which are
being used by the military to
kill and incapacitate human
beings."
In addition, social work Prof.
Roger Lind, vice chairman of
SACUA, has this week called for
an end to classified research.

A discussion on classified re-
search is expected at the Senate
Assembly meeting on March 15
when the faculty body will con-
sider the annual report of the
classified research committee.
ROTC
Although there have been spor-
adic objections to the Reserve
Officer Training Corps for sev-
eral years, the first big protests
against the program began in
fall, 1969.
All through September of that
year militants were regular visi-
tors at North Hall, the ROTC
classroom, and office building.
On Sept. 23, 50 demonstrators
barricaded themselves in North
Hall as over 2,000 people watched %
from outside. Within a few
hours, however, the demonstra-
tors left through the back door,
escaping police barricades.
In December, 1969, in response
to recommendations from the
faculty the Regents passed their
revision of the program.
They approved a renegotiation
of the University's contract with
the Defense Department provid-
ing that all costs of the program
be paid for by the federal gov-
ernment and that ROTC be cpn-
sidered a program rather thanow
an academic department.
Meanwhile, sporadic window-
smashings and demonstrations
continued at North Hall, demand-
ing an end to ROTC.
Last March, the literary col-
lege faculty and several others
voted to end credit for ROTC
courses.
Last May, about 60 people
again occupied North :Tall in
protests following the Cambo-
dian invasion and the Kent State
killings. They temporarily es-
tablished a day care center in
North Hall but left the next day.
(Continued on Page 7)

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JiAmeie
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SiSiSS 1 308;

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