100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridav.

W

PaeTw.HEMCHGN1AL

F..da -I 'UI v iY ti

Satie and

Ives:

records --
Inventive

wildness

I

By DONALD SOSIN
Fans of Erik Satie and Charles
Ives will be pleased to learn
that Columbia has issued two
fine new recordings of works by
these composers and there are
some pretty wild things on them.
Satie is currently in vogue not
only among classicists, but
among pop fans who have thril-
led to Blood Sweat and Tears'
version of one of his "Trois
Gymnopedies." He was a 1s o
much admired in his own time
and was a guiding figure for
most of the French composers
who came after him. Two of his
major works are performed on
the new disc: the ballets, Parade
and Relache, dating from 1917
and 1924. They are both de-
lightful to listen to and skill-
fully performed by the R o y a l
Philharmonic Orchestra, under
Philippe Entremont, making his
conducting debut. Entremont
notes Satie's wit and inventive-
ness, citing the use of typewrit-
er and foghorn in Parade, a
musical first. These curiosities

provide a light atmosphere and
contribute to the work's disarm-
ing nature, reminiscent of later
pieces by Ibert and Poulenc.
Also on the album are two of
the "Gymnopedies". Entremont
has successfully captured the
delicacy of these brief dances,
orchestrated by Debussy.
Equally witty and inventive
was Charles Ives, although his
style was totally different, and
his humor usually perverse. The
new release is devoted to some
of his chamber music, and in-
cludes four works never record-
ed before. The well-known vio-
linist Paul Zukofsky is respon-
sible for digging up much of this
material, and has provided in-
teresting liner notes taken from
Ives' own scribbling in his man-
uscripts. Thus, in the Piano Trio
he informs us that the mark-
ing "TSIAJ" means The Scherzo
is a Joke. And what a joke, be-
ginning with a driving rhythm
which gives way to a rousing
folk song, played slightly out of
tune, stops for a moment, does

a somersault and ends in a
tonal muddle. This capricious-
ness works here, and the work
bears repeated listening.
So does a short piece, "In Re
Con Moto Et Al," for s t r i n g
quartet and piano, which con-
sists of rhythmic studies and a
scherzo-like mood ending dra-
matically on very final chords
in the piano, which are destroy-
ed by a perverse string anticli-
max. "Hallowe'en," a more well-
known piec,e starts out well, and
gets faster and faster, like
dancing around a bonfire, ac-
cording to the composer, b u t
here the dissonant ending de-
signed to throw you off does
not work as well. With the Set
for String Quartet and Piano
Ives is once again in good shape,
especially in the tightly con-
structed "hootchiekootchie sch-
erzo."
Zukofsky and his friends, who
include the rest of his New York
string quartet and pianist Gil-
bert Kalish, also perform t w o
versions of a Largo, first for

violin, clarinet, and piano, and
then in an earlier version with-
out the clarinet. The piece seems
to work better without the un-
necessary intrusion of the clar-
inet in the middle section.
The only complaint I have is
about the occasional tinny
sounds in the review copy I
heard; otherwise this is a wel-
come addition to the recorded
repertoire of an important
American composer.
A novel release from Argo
is a collection of madrigals call-
ed The Triumphs of Oriana,
which are believed to h a v e
been performed at a tournament
for Elizabeth I in 1593. Some-
thing of that spirit has been
recreated here ,with hoofbeats
and a trumpet fanfare, an in-
troductory speech and instru-
mental interludes. Twelve of the
twenty-five in the set are pre-
sented here; they are by var-
ious composers of the time:
Morley, Bennett, Hunt and oth-
ers. I was enchanted by the
way each composer set the last
two lines which are the same
in every case. A variety of moods
results, yet all are perfectly
'Ij
a'i
i I

valid. Grayston Burgess directs
the Purcell Chorus of Voices and
various viols, sackbuts and cor-
nets.
* * *
For devotees of more serious
English choral music, there is
Music from Salisbury Cathedral,
also on Argo, with Christopher
Dearnley conducting the Cathe-
dral Choir. I didn't feel that
there was enough variety in the
eight motets presented and
would not recommend this disc
except for listeners looking for
specific works.
* * *
Three works by Czech com-
posers are played by the Leip-
zig Gewandhausorchester under
Vaclav Neumann, on Telefun-
ken. Smetana's "Bartered Bride
Overture" is an old chestnut
which exists in numerous othera
versions. More interesting were
the selections by Dvorak and
Janacek. The former's opera,
The Devil and Kate, has not
been popular outside his native
country, but if the Hoellentanz
See SATIE, Page 7

HELD OVER
BY POPULAR
DEMAND!
"'Ct iH 7
IS THE MOST
MOVING, THE MOST
INTELLIGENT, THE MOST
HUMANE - OHTO HELL
WITH IT! - IT'STHE
BEST AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!"
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES
mmonwmlunmmmmunes
A ME CHOLSI
TONIGHT'S SHOWS:
7, 9, and 11
m uaw

In honor of Ground Hog Day
WXYZ-M Streo 0
presents
"ThXThn

Tuesday,

February 2-9-30 a.m.

I
m

STUDENTS AND YOUTH CONFERENCE
ON A PEOPLE'S PEACE
FEBRUARY 5, 6 & 7
2500 PEOPLE (with sleeping bogs)
FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
NEED PLACES TO SLEEP

P

GOT ANY
FLOOR SPACE?

CALL
763-1 107, 8, 9

J

I

CINE!

IA II

Time to get It together

" x l
imaii c

NOW!

V! 1I[ DIAL
8-6416

By BERT STRATTON
The Cannonball Adderley Quintet
--"The Price You Got to Pay
to be Free" - Capitol.
I got suckered into buying
Cannonball Adderley's latest re-
cord The Price You Got to Pay
to be Free. It's very bad, which
leads me into wondering why I
keep buying his albums. They're
so ,dreadful.
Yet consider, Cannonball is
potentially jazz's best altoist.
He once was. He once was
blowing along side Coltrane (on
Miles' Kind of Blue) and it was
hard to tell who was playing -
Coltrane or Adderley. That was
in the late '50's when Cannon-
ball was unknown and they
spelled Adderley's name wrong
all the time.
Cannonball Adderley a n c e
played great blues - "Work
Song", "JiveheSamba", etc. -
that was in the sixties.
Now he plays bull, cause he
doesn't know what's happening.
He's saying, "I'm a freak, I'm
socially aware, I'm mad, I'm
hip, I'm black" - he's talking
too much. He's blowing NOTH-
ING. On his new double album
half the numbers are vocals,
shared by Nat Addereley (Can-
non's brother), Nat's fifteen-
year-old son, and Big J uli an
"Cannonball" Adderley himself
- all extremely poor imitations
of Lou Rawls. The recordings
are "live" ones with plenty of
funky applause - which brings
me to, was I, the white man,

supposed to buy this thing in the
first place? In-jokes and cheer-
leading for black pride are the
major schemes of the record.
It's boring crap, no man can
sit through Nat Adderley Jr.'s
(age 15) trite "I'm black and
I'm proud" riffs.
Why doesn't Cannonball take
a year off - get his musical
head together - and put out a
good album, without the gim-
mickery. The record is a rip-
off at any price - it is the Ad-
derley family's answer to the
Andy Williams' Christmas show.
Forget it - but listen to this
- immediately after sitting
through Cannonball's record, I
had to get to the bottom of what
he was trying to do, so I put
on Miles Davis' Bitches Brew,
which is the record which blew
every musician's mind when it
came out a year ago - includ-
ing Cannonball's.
Miles Davis is the God of Jazz
(and now Rock by default). No-
body disputes his word, cause
Miles Davis is the number one
innovator in American music-
in sounds, modal technique,
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by, mail.

scale coloring, everything. He
has synthesized a new 3-D space
music.
Cannonball Adderley is
not an innovator (no sin), but
he is a poor imitator (a sin).
Saxophone freaking-out is his
reply to Miles' calculated a n d
sparse playing.
Cannonball is no musical hero
these days. His previous achieve-
ments tend to fool you. Don't
let them. He's mostly tricks
now.

Alice in Wonderland
Saturday, 7p.m. and 9p.m.
Sunday, 7p.m. and 9p.m.

ISpecial Showing of Se)
I 'Scat. I11:00 P.J
Au1:i.

yen Samurai
M.

Shakespeare
T'MON
of
THRU SAT.
Trueblood Theatre
Box Office 12:30
Curtain 8:00
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
ASTONISHING
MARISA GALVANY!
Hear Sol Hurok's latest lyric
find-Opera diva Golvany in
bravura solo evening
FRIDAY, FEB. 5, 8:30 P.M.
Auditorium of the Detroit
Institute of Arts
Concert Series,
Edith J. Freeman, Chm.
Art Institute Ticket Office
(832-2730)
J.L. Hudson Ticket Services
$4. $5, $6I

X1.50 O
Topic Rec. Artists
the
HIGH LEVEL
RANTERS
"the best folk group in Eng-
land" -Michael Cooney
If ,had the audience
doncinq in the aisles"
-Kentish Times

JEAN PAUL BELMONDO in
"MAN FROM RIO"

:II Hall

University of Michigan Film Society (ARM)
presents another sarcastic double bill
REED'S VITTORIO DE SICA'S

CAROL

NEXT WEEK-
JOHN COHEN
(of the New Lost City
Ramblers)

Our Man In Havana
(SCREENPLAY BY GRAHAM GREENE)

The Bicycle Thief

1 ul Hill $MIT
Z6 1 51
E
r
f

withj
Ernie
Noel

Alec Guinness, screenplay by
Kovacs, Maureen O'Hara, CESARE ZARATTI I
Coward, Ralph Richardson C
What are these leering subversives trying to do now?

9l

vrz

ICHIGAM

Saturday: 7:30 p.m.
11:00 p.M.
Sunday: 9:00 p.m.

DOUBLE ADMISSION $1
Saturday & Sunday, Jan. 30-31
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
ON THE DIAG

Saturday: 9:30 p.m.
Sunday: 7:30 p.m.
11:00 P.M.

WHO'S
HUGHES?.

Does her anger at a
domineering husband
justify awife's taking
a lover? ,

.. __._..__:_. _.. _.._ ...___.__._ _...v_:.. __..

J.
n.

EVERYTHING
You Always Wanted to Know About
. . .MNURSING . ..
But were afraid to ask!
DIAL 434-0'
Tl iolsCAR
2 miles Soutl
Washtenow
Open 6:30-Shov
COLO
®CD lCOLOR

Warm
In-
Car
Heaters

Staring JUDY GARLAND
FRANK MORGAN* RAY BOLGER
BERT LAHR * JACK HALEY
Sat. and Sun. Matinees
1:00 P.M. and 3:00 P.M.

130
VENTER ROAD
rh of
Ave.
)w 7 P.M.
2nd
hit
"Darke
than
Amber'

TON IGH
presents
/ 4
rr
SS .' '..,. .
Searahi
I AND
David Bromberg
IN CONCERT

child 75c

adult $1.50

{ P FITH AVENUE AT l~tftRTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARD01%
IWFOPMAVION 701-1700
theatre emptied
after each show

dlary
of a mad
housewife

"Rush"
Tickets:
200
at $1.00 each
(2 tickets per
person-no choice
of location)
ON SALE
11:30 to 12:00 A.M.

PRESENTS
Beverly Sills
COLORATURA SOPRANO-"Opera's new Superstar."-NEWSWEEK
in HILL AUDITORIUM
SA T IAN 10 R PM_

11

,I

,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan