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January 29, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JAN. 31-7:30
Father Bill Cunningha
of Detroit's "Focus Hope"
will speak on "University reso
and the role of students in ac
NEWMAN (ENTER 331 Thor

P.M.
'In

p.age three

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Sfr'igatn

43-aiti

NEWS PHONE: 76-1-0552
USINESS 1PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, January 29, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

urces
lion"
mpson

news briefs
By The Associated Press

M f r . iii

Th e 0bnlPr90X
Weather Too Cold?
WARM UP BY THE FIRESIDE
COMPLIMENTED BY FINE
FOOD AND WINES

THE UNITED AUTO WORKERS (UAW) has authorized
10,000 union-represented salaried workers to strike Chrysler
Corporation Tuesday, if a new contract agreement is not reached
before then.
The 110,000 production and maintenance workers are expected
to keep the plants running if the walkout develops. Chrysler and the
UAW have recently reached contract agreement covering these non-
salaried workers.
The UAW also charges that Chysler has failed to meet the
13 per cent salary increases granted nonunion employes at General
Motors and Fordafollowing settlements covering hourly rated work-
ers in those companies.
SEN. WILLIAM PROXMIRE (D-Wis.) asked the Food and
Drug Administration yesterday to investigate charges that cereals
manufactured by the Kellogg Co. may be contaminated by
mercury or other toxic agents.
The firm denied the charge.
Proxmire relayed to the FDA accusations that hundreds of mink
have died after being fed Kellogg's products.
He said he was especially alarmed because of information that
one-fifty of the content of Kellogg's mink cereals is made up of
discarded Kellogg's breakfast cereals, originally manufactured for
human consumption.
EAST GERMAN border guards increased their interference
with traffic to West Berlin yesterday.
Hernan Stein, a leader of the Free Democratic party, was refused
entry at Wartha, a remote crossing point.
West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, in a speech before parlia-

-Associated Press
Uganda's new leader
A heavily armed bodyguard surrounds Major General Idi Amin during his first public appearance
since seizing power from Uganda's President Milton Obotse Monday. In the background are some of
the 55 political prisoners freed by Amin during yesterday's ceremony at Uganda's Kololo Airport.
HUNDREDS BEGIN WORK:

Nixon asks
draft end
in mid '73
WASHINGTON - Presi-
dent Nixon pledged yesterday
to make every effort to end
t h e draft by midsummer of
1973 as he urged Congress to
enact reforms to bring the na-
tion closer to an all volunteer
Army.
Nixon asked Congress to extend
induction authority only for two
years to July, 1973. The normal
extension period is for four years.
"We shall make every endeav-
or to reduce draftcalls to zero by
that time, carefully and contin-
ually reexamining ,ur position as
we proceed toward that goal," he
said.
In addition Nixon called for leg-
islation to change the present
draft law to make it "as equitable
as possible."
He urged - as he did a year
ago - that undergraduate stu-
dent deferments be phased o u t
and divinity student exemptions
be eliminated.
He also called for a uniform na-
tional draft call by lottery num-
bers to ensure relatively equal li-
ability by the lottery numbers
throughout the nation.
"I urge favorable congressional
action on these proposals to re-
form the draft and make it as
nearly fair as we can for the time
it is needed," he said.
"No one knows precisely when
we can end conscription," Nixon
said in a special message to Con-
gress. But, he said "The objective
of this administration is to reduce
draft calls to zero, subject to the
overriding considerations of t n e
national security."
Nixon u r g e d Congress to in-
crease the pay of servicemen by
$1.5 billion, especially in the lower
enlisted grades, initiate a test pro-
gram of special p a y incentives,
and expand recruiting, medical
scholarships and ROTC programs
to make military life more desir-
able.
T h e s e legislative proposals,
Nixon said, "would move the U.S.
substantially closer to the goal of
an all volunteer force."
The current induction law ex-
pires July 1, 1971.

Open from 1 1 A.M.-2 P.M. 21 miles from
4 P.M.-10 P.M. NORTH CAMPUS

U.S. trains

agents to cope with
activist bomb threats

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I

Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)

IUILD
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, JAN. 28, 29
Johnny Guitar
Dir. NICHOLAS RAY (1954)
STARRING: Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Scott
Brady, Mercedes McCombridge, Ward Bond, Ernest
Borgnine, and John Carradine.
Joan Crawford plays Vienna, the saloon owner
who sits at the grand piano in a white evening
dress, telling old recollections to Mr. Guitar
while he waits for the lynching party.
"Offbeat western"
"Baroque, pure baroque"
"Straight sulfuric acid"
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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!
A funny, straight, compassionate, domestic comedy,
beautifully acted by Eva Marie Saint and George
Segal" -Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
"May be a turning point in films!"
-The New Yorker

ment, blamed East Germany for deliberately aggravating the Berlin |
situation.in rse
The current Communist harassment of autobahn traffic is in in creased
protest of the Free Democratic party's West Berlin meeting that
open offcialy FrdayFT. RUCKER, ALA. V'? - Hun-
opens officially Friday. dreds of federal agents have com-
pleted training at Southern mili-
ISRAELI FOREIGN MINISTER Abba Eban indicated yes- tary installations where they weree
terday that renewed Egyptian fighting on the Suez Canal would taught how to investigate bamb-
halt U.N. talks between Israel and the Arabs. ings and handle explosives, the
"We are ready to extend the cease-fire" beyond Feb. 5. he government announced yesterday.
told a television interviewer. "Opening of fire is not a circumstance The new training program, un-
that will enable fruitful continuance of peace talks," he added. Reenue Service oIRSe isn ean
Israel, he said, favors extending the U.S.-initiated cease fire | to cope with stepped up b .imbings
because "it is mutually advantageous to both Israel and Egypt." C by radical groups.
REP. GIVES SPACE
Peace group uses gout. office

WASHINGTON ) '- It looks
like dozens of other rooms in
dozens of other cities staffed by
casually dressed long-haired
youths.
But this particular antiwar
nerve center is in an office
building of the House of Repre-
sentatives.
Posters display photographs
of maimed Vietnamese children,
wounded American GIs and
burned fields-all in stark black
and white. One picture shows
a half dozen U.S. soldiers stand-
ing over four Oriental heads that
have been severed from their
bodies.
Half empty coffee cups and
ashtrays litter the tables in the
room.
Rep. Ronald V. Dellums, (D-
Calif.) has turned over the small
room on the fourth floor of the

Longworth Office Building to a
group of Vietnam veterans called
The Citizens' Commission of In-
quiry ,on U.S. War Crimes in
Vietnam.
The room doesn't even have a
number. It's between 1419 and
1421. It is part of the new con-
gressman's suite of offices.
Dellums, a black activist from
Oakland who ran as a peace
candidate, turned the room over
to the group in an attempt to
add a little power to its efforts
to get congressional hearings
on alleged U.S. war atrocities.
"I'm committed to making the
war the number one issue of the
92nd Congress," Dellums told a
news conference in the room
Friday.
"We prosecuted people in
World War II for much less than
is being done in Vietnam," he

said, calling war "a totally ab-
surd instrument for solving in-
ternational differences."
Mike Uhl, a 26 year old veter-
an who was in an Army intelli-
gence unit in Vietnam said the
group considers the much pub-
licized My Lai massacre not an
aberration but "the kind of
thing that happens all the time,
except to a greater degree."
"These atrocities result in the
total distrust and hate the Viet-
namese have for the Ameri-
cans," he said.
Uhl, Bob Johnson, a West
Point graduate and former
Army captain, and others work-
ing out of the Longworth Build-
ing office say they will use the
space as a base for seeking con-
gressional support. They have
already met with 40 different
congressmen or their assistants.

A.L. Posey of Tampa, Fla., spe-
cial investigator for the Alcohol,
Tobacco and Firearms division of
the IRS, said, "It's no secret that
bombings have gotten out of hand.
We don't know why. I guess it is
a sign of the times.
"The Ku Klux Klan had been
doing it (bombing) for a long
time," he said. "Then other radi-
cal groups picked it up and it has
now mushroomed into a sizeable
problem.
"They're blowing up draft board
offices, recruiting stations, college
buildings. That's what uwe're up
against. You can't stop it unless
you know how to investigate it."
Posey said the new training pro-
gram was made necessary by the
Organized Crime Act of 1970 which
gave the IRS division the job of
investigating bombings and con-
trolling explosives.
Posey disclosed the program in
connection with the completion of
courses by agents at four army
posts in the Southeast. "What we
are trying to communicate is that
we're ready to go to work against
the bombers now," he said.
Joseph Kelly of Jackson, Miss.,
chief special investigator for the
division, said each agent has re-
ceived about 40 hours of training
and 500 of them have been trained
to serve in the seven Southeastern
states.
Since the program began Jan. 4,'
an IRS spokesman in Washington
said 1,350 agents have been or are
being trained at centers across the
country.
The rash of bombings over the
past two years caught the gov-
ernment unprepared, said Kelly.
He added that only FBI agents
had received any specialized train-
ing that would tell them what
kind of evidence they must collect
in bombings.
"An agent who has gone through
this training," Kelly said, "has a
good idea of what he must look

for after an explosion. He knows
how to tell what kind of explo-
sive caused a blast. He also knows
what kind of bomb causes certain
types of damage."
Posey, an agent for 15 years and
one of the division's top explo-
sives experts, watched as a soldier
participating in a training demon-
stration observed by newsmen
threw a fire bomb against a
wooden target.
"You can tell it's a ire bomb
now," he said, "but would you
know if you came around two or
three days later? This is what it
is all about."
Fifteen explosive devices were
detonated in a wooded area dur-
ing the demonstration. Kelly said
many of them could be manufac-
tured from "items you buy in the
grocery store."

Gov.adds to rail plan

WASHINGTON (P) - The
Nixon administration signifi-
cantly expanded yesterday the
number of cities to be served by
a new quasi-government corpor-
ation beginning May 1.
The new National Drail Pas-
senger Corp., commonly known
as Railpax, must operate daily
passenger trains between des-
ignated major U.S.cities in the
system until 1974, when it can
drop any unprofitable runs.
The, decision to enlarge the
basic network came after criti-
cism of t h e original proposal
from groups ranging from the
Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion to a lobbying group f o r
railway passengers.
The new routes link principal
West Coast cities, provide ser-
vice from New Orleans through
the Southwest to Los Angeles,
and link the Atlantic Seaboard
and the Middle West.
Railroads that buy into Rail-

pax with cash, rolling stock or
service are free to drop on 30-
day notice any passenger runs
not included in the mandatory
system. Railroads not joining
Railpax must continue all pres-
ent rail passenger service until
1975.
Congress h a s appropriated
$40million as the initial cap-
italization for the rail corpora-
tion. Other capital would be
supplied by participating rail-
roads and the private market.
Transportation Secretary John
Volpe.said, "The rail passenger
story is destined to become the
all-time comeback in the history
of American transportation."
"By providing improved ser-
vice, clean and reliable equip-
ment and more efficient utiliza-
tion of facilities, the corpora-
tion has the opportunity to re-
verse the long-term decline in
rail ridership," he added.

"A FRIGHTENINGLY
ACCURATE PORTRAYAL
OF THE LOVE LIFE
OF A SUBURBANITE"
-Show Magazine
"88 minutes that go like
60!"
--Look
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!"
-Russell Barker, 'The
Observer'-N.Y. Times
-Red Reed in N.Y. Times

TONIGHT AT 8:00!

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COLOR
starring
EVA MARIE SAINT
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(star of 'The Owl and
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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!"
-Judith Crist,
New York Magazine
-Bob Salmaggi,
Group W Radio
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Perceptive, unsentimental por-
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