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January 20, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P-e: woTH.M.HGA-DIL

Wednesday, January 20, 1971
- - --" -1lll ||| ill illllI illllllllllllllllll

... uages
-Daily-Tom Gottlieb

music
Shaffer, Menuhin
overcome program

95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
FAST READING IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN!

11 1

By DONALD SOSIN
It would appear that in any
concert there are two consider-
ations in judging its merits-
the music, and the performers.
In last night's recital in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall by Elaine
Shaffer, flutist and Hephzibah,
Menuhin, pianist, the artists
definitely came out on top.
The fact that three of the
pieces were fairlyobscure does
not enter into account. Over-

1824-1910), but most of his
works have dropped from the
repertory. His sonata "Undine"
op. 167, also written for clari-
net reminds one in form of
Mendelssohn or Weber, with
musical leanings toward the
former and the mundaneness of
the latter. It contained some in-
teresting figures for the piano,
but ultimately left me sighing
at a lot of excellent playing to
no great avail.

All those who completed courses held this
past year at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved
speeds of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same
or increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
-save hours, use your time more efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster than
you do now
-improve your comprehension and increase your
enjoyment of reading material
at a cost less than HALF that of nearly all
other commercial reading courses!

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looked gems from every era are Shaffer and Menuhin are
constantly being revived. Only outstanding artists. Shaffer has
a few days ago the violinist played with the New Orleans
Henryk Szeryng announced the Symphony, and has concertized
rediscovery of a concerto by extensively. I understand that
Paganini which may prove tobe she plays a platinum flute, out-
exciting. But frequently a work doing Rampal's. which is' only
reappears on programs which, gold. She and Menuhin, who is
as one musicoligist says, "rich- well-known as a solo performer
ly deserves its obscurity," as well as accompanist, work
Last night we heard sonatas perfectly as a team, with all the
bL Friedrich Kuhlau and Carl characteristics that make for
Reinecke which fall into this fine chamber music: carefully
category. Kuhlau was a contem- worked-out phrasing, balance,
porary of Beethoven, introduced etc. Their opening selection, the
many of his works inDenmark. Mozart Sonata K. 14 in C was
Himself a flutist, he wrote a lightly and simply played, re-
number of works for the instru- flecting the naivete of the ma-
ment. The sonata, op. 71 inre, terial. Even in such an e'rly
consists of four movements of work, though, the wit and grace
florid, grandiose singularly un- of later Mozart is present.
inspired writing. The piano be- The fourth work on the pro-
gins with majestic arpeggios gram, which, like the Mozart.
(promise 'em anything but give provided musical as well as
'em . . .), the flute soon enters technical satisfaction, was the
with more of the same, and from superb sonata by Francis Pou-
there on in we' have almost lenc, a staple of the modern re-
twenty-five minutes of impres- pertoire. It is in three move-
sive virtuosic gestures that leave ments, with references in the
one with very little, finale to the other two, a device
After the intermission came Poulenc also employs in his
the Reinecke work. Fortunately early sonata for two pianos. By
the air had been cleared of the this time, however, the high level
monotonous e minor sonorities of playing had fallen slightly,
of the Kuhlau, but not for long, which can possibly oe attributed
as we were hit with it once to fatigue from the preceding
again. Reinecke had a prolific two works, a fatigue heightened
career, composing over two hun- by their musically unrewarding
dred works, including several nature.
symphonies and concerti, and In spite of the questionable
an abundance of chamber music musical values of the program
for all combinations, especially as a whole, the concert did
involving the flute. He was register positively in my mind,
quite popular in his day (which because of the high caliber of
lasted for much of the time from performance by both artists.

Bring a book to a free, live demonitration of the reading skills which will be taught in a GUARANTEED
course offered this semester,
Demonstration This Week-Tues. & Thurs., Jan. 19, 21-7:30 P.M.
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower
Missed "Harvey"?-Don't Miss THIS
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT!

Moral code withstands album ad

BURBANK - A black-and-
white 60-second television com-
mercial for Captain Beef heart's
latest album on Straight/Re-
prise, Lick My Decals Off, Baby,
was refused yesterday by KTTV
in Los Angeles for airing on any
of the station's programs.
When asked by the record
company as to reasons for not
accepting the spot, KTTV sta-
tion manager Charles Young
said, "I Just don't like it. I think
it's crude and don't want it on
ny. air. Let's say I find the
commercial unacceptable and
let it go at that." When asked
for a spe6eific reason, Young de-
clared the album title is "ob--
scene."
Time had been scheduled with
KTTV for Sunday night's "Crea-
ture Features," Monday's edi-
tion of "George Putnam and the
News," and the Tuesday airing
of "The David Frost Show."
Television advertising of Lick
My Decals Off, Baby was to be
a first for the record company
and a kick-off for Captain
Beefheart's upcoming six-week
national tour.
In the eyes of Warner/Re-
prise, the commercial is any-
thing but obscene. "We knew
the station might not under-
stand what we were doing, buy
For the student body.
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Sizes 34to46
CHECKMAT e
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we didn't suspect they'd turn us
down cold," continues Halver-t
stadt. "Because the spot's really
different, it does everything a
commercial is supposed to do.
It begins with a cigarette flip-
ping through the air in slow
motion several times with Beef-
heart singing 'Woe-is-a-me-
bop.' There are long silences.
Beefheart finally appears doing
his famed Hand and Toe Invest-
ment. Rockette Morton, one of
the guys in Beefheart's Magic
Band, crosses the screen with a
black sack over his head work-
ing an egg beater. The Captain
kicks over a bowl of white paint
in slow motion. It's non sequitur
stuff that's funny, attention
getting, and pure Beefheart. It's
unfortunate that station should
be so frightened by it."
After refusal by Metromedia,
Warner/Reprise took the spot
to the National Association -)f
Broadcasters, who also nixed the
spot for airing on any of their

member stations, citing the
General Program Standards sec-
tion of the NAB's Code Author-
ity: "Program materials should
enlarge the horizons of the
viewer, provide him with whole-
some entertainment, a f f j r d
helpful stimulation, and remind
him of the responsibilities which
the citizen has towards his so-
ciety . ..
"The thing that seems wrong,"
states WB Creative Services Di-
rector Stan Cornyn, "is that a
single individual can make an
arbitrary pudgement as to whe-
ther or not a television commer-
cial is acceptable. And this
seems to be the case. The man
probably knows nothing about
what's happening in contem-
porary music. We tried to make
a spot that is valid artistically
as well as from an advertising
point of view, and we were
kicked out. I'd like to make this
an issue and take it directly to
the FCC."
The Place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
BOB PETTERS
Speaking on
"Did Beethoven Wear His
Heart on His Sleeve?"
(or Classicism-Romanticism
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and PERFORMING
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"Pathetique" Sonata
"Moonlight" Sonata
Sonata Opus 110
featuring new interpretations
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VAFDFIPF1MTIHF
UNOEFiI4IIJUNO
By CARL La FONG
Relax, Buffy. Help is on the way.
Jesse Edwin Davis is a Kiowa Commanche fom Oklahoma. His
remarkable guitar can be heard on all of Taj Mahal's albums, and
as of next week, on his own Atlantic album, "Jesse Davis." His
dad, one of the southwest's noted artists, painted the cover.
Through his Washita. Productions he is producing Roger
Tilloson for Atlantic, Gram Parsons for A & M and Southwind
for Blue Thumb.
Jesse was fortunate. He was born into a loving, strong family
back in Oklahoma City. His feelings about-the injustices being
suffered by his people are a fact of his life, not of his occupation.
He is a warm, together person who has succeeded on his own
terms, His actions speak for him.

'p

1

FRI., SAT.,
SUN. NITE
Michael
Cooney

At State t&r Liberty Sts
DIAL s .
* ~
JACK N/CHOLSON
RIvE lffafi PIECES
"YEAR'S BEST"
-N.Y. Film Critics
OPEN 1 P.M.
SHOWS: 1:20, 3:10, 5 P.M.,
7 P.M., 9 P.M.

i

."ff

...--- ,

A SEMINAR
FOR PEOPLE SICK AND TIRED OF
WAR AND VIOLENCE
" Chances for chemical-biological warfare on Pales-
tine?
* What is a fahlawi personality?
" How Jews and Arabs can live together in Jesu-
salem?
" Potential and possibilities for a Mideast federa-
tion in 1973?
" What are Palestinian and Israeli activists doing
for peace?
" What is the social psycholgy of peoples in conflict?
" What are the Middle East military industrial com-
plexes?
These are typical topics in the
SEMINAR ON THE
ARAR-ISRAEL CON FRONTATION

"One doesn't talk
a b o u t Michael
Cooney, one listens
to him."
MICH. DAILY
SUNDAY, 2 P.M.
CH ILDREN'S
CONCERT
with
MICHAEL
COONEY
THURSDAY-
PAM CLARK
guitar, banio
75c
NEXT WEEK-

4

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Guitars: Eric Clapton & Joel Scott Hill / Keyboards: Larry
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