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January 20, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-20

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i

ENJOY
ISRAELI EVENINGS at the
Rive Gauche
with Israeli food, music, singing,
and landscapes
FRIDAY & SATURDAY (Jan. 22,23)
from 9 P.M.
at the Madelon Pound House
1024 Hill
EVERYONE WELCOME!

age three

im4c

Siigqtn

out 1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

-"..

Wednesday, January 20, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Pace Three

.. .....I i a ~

.

n briefs
n e w.s...By The Associated Press

I

CINEMA II
Aud. A Angell Hall
SEVEN SAMAU RI
Friday, Jan. 22
7:00, 9:30
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
Saturday, Jan. 23
7:00, 9:05
THE BALCONY
Saturday, Jan. 23
11:00,
Sunday, Jan. 24
1 :00 and 3:00 P.M.
________-

THE DEPARTMENT of Health, Education and Welfare an-
nounced yesterday it will cut off a major portion of matching
welfare aid to Indiana and Nebraska April 1.
The two states violate federal public assistance regulations 'by'
failing to increase grants to keep pace with cost of living increases.
Indiana stands to lose $39 million a year and Nebraska $15 mil-
lion under the major welfare program - aid for dependent children.
The department recently canceled similar plans to terminate $684
million in welfare matching aid to California after Gov. Ronald Rea-
gan promised to initiate court action to resolve the conflict.;
The two states can postpone the cut-off action by appealing!
HEW's decision in the court.
RICHARD RUSSELL of Georgia, for years one of the most
powerful members of the Senate was reported in critical condi-
tion yesterday after a six weeks bout with a respiratory infection.
Doctors had described his condition as serious since he entered
the hospital Dec. 8 but changed this yesterday to critical.
Russell is the first American in history to serve more than half
his life in the Senate. He was elected to the Senate in 1932 and took
office in 1933. Prior to that he was Georgia's youngest governor, 33.
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday ordered a halt to further con- Rep. Car
struction of the cross-Florida barge canal to prevent what he
termed "potentially serious environmental damages."
Money for the 107-mile-long canal was authorized by Congress in A i e r
1962. It would run from Mayport on the Atlantic coast near Jackson-
ville to Yankeetown on the Gulf Coast.
Nixon said the canal's total cost, if completed, would be about '
$180 million and about $50 million already has been committed to con- i to D e m o C
struction.
The purpose of the canal, Nixon noted, was to reduce tranhpor- WASHINGTON (AP)-Rep. Carl
tation costs for barge shipping. He added that it was designed at a; Albert of Oklahoma was over-
time when the focus of federal concern in such matters was still al- whelmingly nominated by the
most completely on maximizing economic return. Democrats for speaker yesterday,
* * * after which Rep. Hale Boggs,
AN OIL SLICK from a ripped-open tanker fouled ocean Louisiana won the five-way race
for House Democratic leader.
beaches near San Francisco yesterday.
The Coast Guard estimated that 500,000 to 1.9 million gallons Boggs beat back Democratic
of bunker fuel oil gushed from the Oregon Standard after a collision caucus challenges from Rep. Mor-
early Monday with its sister ship, the Arizona Standard. otherU candidates for the leader-
Standard Oil Co. of California, owner of both vessels, pressed a ship job.
gigantic cleanup campaign which began before dawn Monday and Boggs won on the second ballot
continued around the clock. after Rep. Wayne Hays of Ohio
Officials said that with good weather the oil spread over San withdrew from the race and threw
Francisco Bay after two tankers collided may be disposed of in two his support to Boggs.
or three days. Rep. James G. O'Hara of Michi-
There was no immediate estimate of damage to property and 'gan also withdrew but did not
wildlife. announce support for any of the
The Coast Guard said it was the biggest oil slick in the bay's three remaining candidates.
history, spreading at least a dozen miles. The final vote was 140 for

High court limits
pleas for illegal
confession claim
WASHINGTON (M - The Supreme Court unanimously
yesterday limited the opportunity of convicts to win new trials
on allegations their confessions were involuntary.
Ruling against a California convict, the court said a
prisoner must show more than "shortcomings" in the weigh-
ing of his confession at trial before he can have a new hear-
ing.
He must show, said Justice Potter Stewart, that if his
version of the facts are correct the confession was forced and
iadmissible as evidence.
The ruling undoubtedly will restrain whatever tendencies

-Associated Press

l Albert

ggs elected
ratic posts

0

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'drop the low man each time
around.
The Democratic caucus turned
down, 111 to 55, Conyers' pro-
posed resolution directing the
party's committee on committees
to put the Mississippians at the
bottom of the seniority list on
their respective panels.
Consideration of rules changes,I
including modification of the
seniority system, was put over un-
til today.

exist in federal courts to act
favorably on habeas corpus
petitions by prisoners who arej
convicted in state courts.
The decision bars a hearing for
Veron Atchley, convicted in 1959
of killing his estranged wife in
Palermo, Calif., by firing six bul-
lets into her body at close range.
Although Atchley won a reduc-
tion of his death sentence to life
imprisonment, all appeals w e r e
turned down, including one in the
Supreme Court 10 years ago.
However, in 1967 the U.S. Dis-
trict Court in San Jose said he
was entitled to a new hearing and
the U.S. Circuit C o u r t in San
Francisco agreed in 1969. Califor-
nia appealed to the Supreme
Court and won yesterday's rever-
sal.
Atchley's challenge was over the
confession he gave to an insur-
ance agent who came to talk with
him in prison ostensibly about in-
surance but really to take the con-
fession on a hidden recorder.
The federal courts in Califor-
nia said Atchley was entitled to a
new hearingrbecause the Califor-
nia trial court "had excluded rel-
evant a n d perhaps crucial evi-
dence on the issue of whether the
confession was voluntary."
Specifically, the courts said, the
trial judge had not found o u t
what police said to the insurance
agent, whether the agent had
feigned sympathy, or whether

'U.S. hc
budget

a N.Y. police
vote to end
job action
NEW YORK (R) - The city's
patrolmen voted yesterday to re-
turn to patrol duty during the af-
ternoon, ending a six-day job ac-
tion.
The 225-113 vote came during a
stormy delegate meeting of th e
Patrolman's Benevolent Associa-
tion a n d the policemen started
back to work even as the vote was
underway.
Earlier, the first two tours due
on duty spurned their union lead-
ers back-to-work appeal pending
the outcome of the meeting.
An indication of the direction
the vote might take came when a
source in the PBA let it be known
an earlier secret vote of the 26,
000 patrolmen, showed 87 per cent
were willing to return.
It was reliably reported the del-
egates secured the vote when they
assured patrolmen t he courts
would not invoke the Taylor law
- which bans strikes by public
employes - against them and that
any appeal of a decision in a trial
of the controversial p a y parity
case would be expedited.
PBA " President Edward Kier-
nan had asked his men to return
to work Monday after a trial was
set for yesterday on the parity is-
sue. The patrolmen refused, about
85 per cent of them maintaining
their job action.
Police Commissioner Patrick V.
Murphy said Monday he was with-
in 48 hours of asking the mayor
for National Guard assistance to
meet police needs.
Indications were that there was
no great upsurge in crime, fewer
calls for assistance were being -re-
ceived, arrests had dropped sharp-
ly and that the skeleton force of
police was responding to m o s t
emergencies.
Cold weather also helped keep
the crime rate down.

Busing
cut

Atchley was trying to obtain a
WACTHTNTrrM OI 1P) P lsn., n lawyer.

i

A GOVERNMENT STUDY GROUP concluded yesterday that
widespread poisoning from mercury in food is unlikely.
But it said the government must move with utmost urgency to
remove deposits of the metal from polluted waterways.
The scientists also urged further curbs on industrial discharges of
mercury and a virtual ban on pesticides containing the metallic com-
pound.

i

o

-- --4i
.t,&~,. *

Areyou still
reading
the way your
parents read?
In the first grade, when you were taught
to read "Run Spot Run," you had to read it
out loud. Word-by-word. Later, in the second
grade, you were asked to read silently. But
you couldn't do it.
You stopped reading out loud, but you
continued to say every word to yourself.
Chances are, you're doing it right now.
This means that you read only as fast
as you talk. About 250 to 300 words per
minute. (Guiness' Book of World Records
lists John F. Kennedy as delivering the fast-
est speech on record: 327 words per
minute.)
The Evelyn Wood Course teaches you
to read without mentally saying each word
to yourself. Instead of reading one word at
a time, you'll learn to read groups of words.
To see how natural this is, look at the
dot over the line in bold type.
grass is green
You immediately see all three words.
Now look at the dot between the next two
lines of type.

Petitioning
Now Open For
CINEMA 11
BOARD
Interviews to be
held Wed., Jan. 20
and Thurs., Jan. 21
in 3516 S.A.B.
Sign up on S.G.C.
Bulletin Board,
S.A.B. Lobby
(ask at desk)

Boggs- 88 for Udall and 17 for kw) - rins o- an oU " .
RepB.s, isof U alifona. 7 rspend $1.4 billion on low-income But Stewart, speaking for the
Rep. . F. Sisk of California. rural housing this fiscal year are Supreme Court, said these points
eAlbert had onl thoke opposi- reported to have been cut one- aren more than "shortcomings"'
Mic from Rep. John Conyers race third by the Nixon administra- which by themselves do not make
Michigan who got into the race tion. Advocates of the program a case for an illegal confession.
Monday as a gesture of opposition say it has no budgetary impact Yesterday, the Sureme Court
to Albript'sefaiuresitoibackeatioven and such a cut is unnecessary. also ruled on the case of a Wis-
to srip th rMississippi delegation The program is operated by the consin woman whose name was
of its seniority. Farmers Home Administration in posted in bars for excessive drink-
The party caucus elected Rep. t h e Agriculture Department. As ing. Six out of nine justices said
Olin F. Teague of Texas as cau- recently as a m o n t h ago the states have the power to control
Tcus chaa -in uet. ny agency talked ofsdoubling its sale of loquor but not the right to
Teague was a last-minute entry, ho using-loan business from t h epuastgaoanne
He received 155 votes to 91 for $761 million in 1969-70. p"t a stigma on anyone.
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois, Now, agency spokesmen say, the
who had held the caucus chair- $1.4 billion goal for the year end- The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
?mnhpfor four years. ignx ue3 sudrrve aged by students at the University of
manshiing next June 30 is under review Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Boggs had led the five-way race ; but refuse to say whether the tar- Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
for House Democratic leader on get is still that large. igan, 420 Maynard 'St., Ann Arbor,
the first inconclusive Democratic If the cutback is as large as re- Michigan 48104. Published. daily Tues-
balot eserdybutlaked ~t tis eas tatagecydaythog Sunday morning Univer-
caucus ballot yesterday, but lacked ported, this means that agency sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
the required majority. lending for the next six months carrier, $10 by mail.
Udall was second but the win- will total around $300 million, far Summer Session published Tuesday
ner depended on succeeding bal- less than what some housing au- through saturday morning. Subscrip-
lots which, starting with the third, thorities say is required. ___nrate:_$___y__rr__r,_$__y__a___

t
i
1

I

FREE BOWLING EXHIBITION

I

,' .-

Today-i -3

6-8 p.m.

d iI
"BREATHTAKING, I rec
-NBC
it very highly.'Toda,'
H AGBARD
SIGNE

L

Ends
Wednesday

week and finish each page in 31 seconds.
At 3,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read the 447 page novel The God-
father in 1 hour and 4 minutes.
These are documented statistics based
on the results of the 450,000 people who
have enrolled in the Evelyn Wood course
since its inception in 1959.
The course isn't complicated. There
are no machines. There are no notes to
take. And you don't have to memorize any-
thing.
95% of our graduates have improved
their reading ability by an average of 4.7
times. On rare occasions, a graduate's read-
ing ability isn't improved by at least 3 times.
In these instances, the tuition is completely
refunded.
Take a free
Mini-Lesson
on Evelyn Wood.
Do you want to see how the course
works?
Then take a free Mini-Lesson.-r The
Mini-Lesson is an hour long peek at what
the Evelyn Wood course offers.
We'll show you how it's possible to
accelerate your speed without skipping a
single word. You'll have a chance to try your
hand at it, and before it's over, you'll actually
increase your reading speed. (You'll only
increase it a little, but it's a start.)
We'll show you how we can extend your
memory. And we'll show you how we make
chapter outlining obsolete.
Take a Mini-Lesson this week. It's a
wild hour. And it's free.

DIAL
8-6416

UNION LANES
BUZZ FAZIO
member Brunswick Advisory Staff

For further information:
761-7403 or 665-0428

EASTMAN COLOR ,!
, THURSDAY
"LA VIOL"

F

and it grows
when it rains-
With training, you'll learn to use your
innate ability to see groups of words.
As an Evelyn Wood graduate, you'll be
able to read between 1,000 and 3,000
words per minute . . . depending on the
difficulty of the material.
At 1,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read a text book like Hofstadtler's
American Political Tradition and finish
each chapter in 11 minutes.
At 2,000 words per minute, you'll be
.able to read a magazine like Time or News-

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