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November 11, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-11

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NOON BOOK DISCUSSION
T H URSDAY
3545 Student Activities Bldg.
THE TEACHINGS OF DON JUAN
THE YAQUI WAY OF KNOWLEDGE
author-CARLOS CASTENADA reviewed by MARI SHORE
-Next Week-
THE BLACK WOMAN
OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Michigan Union, 3rd floor
and ANN ARBOR CITY MUSIC PRODUCTIONS
present in concert
"BUDDIES IN THE SADDLE"
and
"CARNAL KITCHEN"
SAT., NOV. 13-8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE (LEAGUE)
TICKETS $1.50
AVAILABLE AT: University Cellar, Discount Records (S. Univ.),
Salvation Records (Maynard & S. Univ. stores). Available at
Mendelssohn Box Office Sat, Noon

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, November 11, 1971

y briefs,
By The Associated Press

Senate

passes

Program Information 665-6290
Shows at 1 -3 - 5 - 7 - 9

STARTING TODAY
" . gut-tightening thriller
and one of the most excit-
ing films you'll see this
year!"

CUBAN PRIME MINISTER Fidel Castro arrived in Chile
late Wednesday on his first trip to another Latin American
country since 1959.
He was greeted in Santiago by fellow Marxist Salvador Allende,j
president of Chile.
Castro headed a high-level delegation of Cuban leaders who
plan to remain in Chile for 10 to 12 days.
UNITED STATES intelligence sources report more than
5,000 tons of Soviet military equipment, including aircraft, should
arrive in India this month.
The arms shipment were said to result from recent visits to In-
dia by high-ranking Russian diplomatic and military officials after
the signing in August of a Soviet-India treaty of friendship and
cooperation.
ENEMY FORCES attacked Cambodia's Phnom Penh air-
port and a nearby communications center in coordinated attacks
yesterday inflicting heavy casualties and damage.
No accurate count of the casualties was available, though unof-
ficial reports said about 25 Cambodians were killed and 30 wounded
in the the two attacks.
THE EGYPTIAN GOVERNMENT has intensified its cam-
paign to prepare its people for possible renewed war with Israel.
President Anwar Sadat repeatedly has vowed that 1971 will
be the year of decision on progress in the Middle East, either through
diplomacy or war.
Sadat met for four hours Tuesday night with the Supreme
Council of the armed forces. He is to make a major speech to par-
liament on Thursday.
CONGRESSIONAL SPOKESMEN called yesterday for rever-
sal of Nixon administration policies which, they said, have re-
sulted in huge grain surpluses and the lowest farm prices since
the depression.
At issue before the Senate Agriculture Committee are bills
which would divert millions of bushels of wheat and corn and other
feed grains off the market and into a strategic reserve and increase
loan rates on grains by as much as 25 per cent.
THE NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION I
adopted the first international guidelines on controlling air pol-
lution yesterday.
They cover protection against particulates-pollutants which
are not in the form of gas-and sulphur oxides. These are produced
largely by the burning of coal and petroleum products.
By the end of 1972, guidelines are to be ready for the pollutants
originating in auto exhausts, such as carbon monoxides and the
chemicals that cause smog.I
THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION announced
yesterday it has recalled during the last 'half year about 105
million vitamin C pills which it said were inadequately labeled
and posed a threat to heart patients trying to ward off colds.
The agency warned the public last May that excessive use of
some vitamin C tablets, containing undeclared sodium ascorbate
rather than ascorbic acid, may be hazardous to persons on low salt
diets.

bill1 for foreign
0
economic aid
WASHINGTON UP) - The Senate passed last night a
slimmed down, $1.1 billion foreign economic aid bill to re-
place a combined package rejected 12 days ago. The vote
was 61 to 23.
It voted in favor of the new bill after rejecting amend-
ments to increasing funds and ease lending restrictions. Ac-
tion on a companion military aid bill, second half of a $2.3
billion package, is scheduled today.
The House meanwhile, was expected to pass and send
to a doubtful fate in the Senate an interim funding resolu-
tion.
The Senate's timetable for work
on the two regular foreign aid s o
bills called for final action by the Jap a o
end of the week.
Senator Hugh Scott (R-Pa.) ex-
pressed confidence that the for-
aiy i l l will n cthe RfrtP

-Associated Press
Harris drops out
Sen. Fred Harris (D-Okla.) announced yesterday he is ending
his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination because
he is "broke."
CONFIRMATION EXPECTED
Labor disapproves
nominee for Court

Ken Barnard-Detroit News
CLINT E t
yf ' .t WVS;'7r. t '> ,, y

Labor leaders joined yester-
day in the attack on the civil
rights and civil liberties record
of William H. Rehnquist, one
of President Nixon's nominees
for two Supreme Court vacan-
cies.
Spokesmen for the AFL-CIO
and the United Auto Workers
union urged the Senate Judici-
ary Committee to reject Rehn-
quist's nomination.
H o w e v e r, the Commit-
tee chairman, Sen. James O.
Eastland, (D-Miss.), has ex-
pressed confidence that Lewis F.
Powell, Jr.. and Rehnquist will
be speedily confirmed by the
Senate after the committee acts
on the nominations.
Sen. Birch Bayh, (D-Ind.), a
member of the committee's lib-
eral bloc, also has said he thinks
both nominees have majority
support despite his frequently
expressed in i s g i v i n g s about
Rehnquist's appointment.
Andrew J. Biemiller, testify-
ing for the AFL-CIO, called
Rehnquist "a right wing zealot

.. . an extremist in favor of ex-
ecutive supremacy and diminu-
tion of personal freedom."
Leonard Woodcock, president
of the United Auto Workers
union, has assailed Supreme
Court nominee Rehnquist as
possessing "neither the breadth
of vision nor the humanity
which is required of a Su-
preme Court justice."
Lewis F. Powell Jr. of Rich-
mond, Va. and Nixon's second
nominee, was attacked by Henry
L. Marsh III, a black attorney
and Richmond city council
member. He said powell con-
sistently attempted to thwart
federal court bans on subsidies
of white parents who were send-
ing their children to private
schools during the period Pow-
ell was on the Virginia state
board of education from 1961
to 1969.
Rep. John Conyers Jr. of
Michigan, testifying for the
congressional B 1 a c k Caucus,
urged rejection of both Powell
and Rehnquist.

eign ali willw pass Le oenabe
if introduced as two separate eco-
nomic and military bills. "There
seems to be ample votes for the
military aid measure and prob-
ably enough for the economic
aid bill," he said.,
Even if the Senate approves the,
bill by Monday, the House-where
leaders want a $3 billion program.
-and Senate almost certainly
could not work out a final new
foreign aid authorization bill be-
fore the program expires.
Meanwhile the State Depart-
ment said a new General Ac-
counting Office ruling yesterday
means that as matters now stand
the U.S. foreign aid agency must
go out of business Monday.
Press officer Charles Bray said
the GAO finding "lends further
urgency" to administration backed
efforts in Congress to continue the
aid program on a temporary ba-
sis until the legislators agree on
a regular authorization.
The GAO is Congress' financial
watchdog.
The State Department spokes-
man said he does not expect Con-
gress will wash its hands of the
foreign aid program and leave
13,000 employes of the aid-ad-
ministering Agency for Interna-
tional Development stranded here
and abroaa.
But he said that since the two
Senate and two House committees
that pass on aid legislation are
unlikely to finish work on a new
regular aid bill by Monday Con-
gress should pass a stopgap con-
tinuing resolution.

Okinawa
WASHINGTON (P) - The Sen-
ate approved overwhelmingly yes-
terday the agreement returning
Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands
to Japan next year.
The agreement represents the
end of an era in U.S.-Japan rela-
tions. It returns to Japan the last
remaining occupied territory held
by the United States and ends
some 27 years of the status of oc-
cupying power.
The treaty will not take effect
until after the Japanese Diet has
also ratified it and adopted leg-
islation required to carry out the
agreement and defense arrange-
ments.
However, the United States will
retain for an indefinite period the
use of 100 of the 134 separate
military installations on the is-
land.
Meanwhile Tokyo police said
they arrested 90 leftist demon-
strators in Japan yesterday who
were among thousands of work-
ers and students supporting a 48
hour general strike on Okinawa.
The strike and demonstrations
protested the new - U.S.-Japanese
Okinawa agreement because it
allows U.S. military bases to re-
main.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

TONIGHT ONLY-THURS., NOV. 11
BATTLE OF
ALGIERS
dir. GILLO PONTECORYO, 1966

"PLAY MISTY FOR ME'
,..an invitation to terror...
Co-Starrng
JESSICA WALTER DONNA MILLS
JOHN LARCH' SCREENPLAY BY JO HEIMS AND DEAN RIESNER
STORY BY JO HElMS - DIRECTED BY CLINT EASTWOOD
PRODUCED BY ROBERT DALEY . A JENNINGS LANG PRESENTATION
A MALPASO COMPANY PRODUCTION"A UNIVERSAL-MALPASO COMPANY PICTURE
TECHNICOLOR" RI- " ' "

The School of Music and Department of Art present
MOZAR T'S OPERA
The Magic Flute
English translation by Josef Blatt
NOVEMBER 19, 20, 22, & 23-8 P.M.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
$1.50 & $3.00 ($1.50 tickets for U-M students only)
Conductor Josef Blatt Stage Director: Ralph Herbert
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Please enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope
BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15, AT 12:30 P.M.

Shows at
7:15,& 9 :45

AUD. B
Angell'Hall

75c

presented by Alley Cinema-
ann arbor film cooperative

{ -
- I
Czech mates
Czechoslovakia boasts of six major string quartets of quality, but the Prague String Quartet ranks higest
on the scale. Their masterfully integrated ensemble work has kept this group high on the list of chamber
music artists throughout the world since 1956, when the present quartet began their public performances.
They were first introduced to American audiences in the 1965-66 season with three concerts
on the West Coast and one in Hawaii, between engagem ents in Japan and South America. Such was their
reception that the following season they were presented in a series of thirty successful concerts
throughout the United States.
On Tuesday evening, Nov. 16, in Rackham Auditorium, the Prague Quartet will present Haydn's Quartet in
C major, Op. 54, No. 2; followed by the music of t wo Czech composers, Janacek's Quartet No. 2, and
Dvorak's Quartet in G major, Op. 106. Tickets are available at $2.50, $4 and $5. Performances at 8:30.

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

hand-crocheted cloche and
scarf set imported from Italy
add charm and
color to winter outings.
The cloche and fringed
68" scarf are shell-stitch
wool. Purple/pink/blue
or olive/orange/white.
Set, $12

**
A ENEAATI®N.
A revealing portrait of
the new liberated woman
* BLAZING COLOR
Plus 2nd feature*
cinema 481.330
DII PL,
Thursday and Friday
BAKER'S
WIFE F
Dir. MARCEL PAGNOL,
1939. The village baker
cannot work because he
laments his wife's depar-
ture with a stupid, sexy

~.E 'lL! ~

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