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November 11, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 1 1, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 11, 1971

Carson sh
'Godot' cc
By GREG JARBOE
Brilliant! If you don't see another play this
year, see The University Players' production of
Waiting for Godot. If they don't have any tickets
left, demand that they hold additional perform-
ances next week. Samuel Beckett's play is The
definitive dramatic work of the past quarter
century, and Donald Boros has directed a superb
cast to capture the essence of this profoundly
disturbing drama.
Central to the performance was O.K. Carson's
phenomenal portrayal of Pozzo and Klaus Berg-
mann's overwhelming presentation of Lucky. Car-
son was overwhelming as Pozo. He was Shakes-
perian actor, he was Adolf Hitler, and ultimately
he was nothing more than the rest of us. His
control was magnetic. While on stage one watched
his every movement, even down to lighting his
pipe, because he demanded attention. In the sec-
ond act, Carson-there are no words powerful
enough to describe the powerful emotions he
rouses.
Bergmann's Lucky explodes on stage with vio-
lence. At first there is some sense that he is over-
acting, that in some way he is acting his suffering
too much. Then with his Qua Qua Qua speech the
pain, and torture is real. It is not over acting on
Bergmann's part but underestimation on the audi-

00
ines while
mes alive
ence's. We have seen too much artifical violence
on television. We are no longer moved-or we
don't want to be. But Bergmann rips off our own
disguise-our own mask. We are waiting for Godot
-we are Godot. We don't ever come near to
touching or changing those around us. In the
second act, with Lucky c6llapsed over his cases,
and Pozzo stretched out over the edge of the
stage, they are helpless. We are content to sit
and watch their suffering-not acting, but suf-
fering, just as Didi and Gogo do. That is why we
laugh when they take so long to do the most
simplistic thing-help Pozzo to his feet.
Ian Stulberg presented a version of Estragon
that I have never seen before. Suffering was not
a point of intellectual discussion but an aware-
ness of feet, bruises, bones.
Homer Foil provided a superb contrast to
Stulberg's Gogo. Foil swept through his lines
while Stulberg punched them. Perhaps the best
visual example of their difference came when
Estragon examined his boot for stones while Vla-
dimir examined his hat for thoughts.
After the laughs, after the words, after the
action, the play is about us-the audience.
In some sort of final assessment, Waiting for
Godot must be seen.

1

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4

The Me Nobody Knows, the
1970 New York Obie Award win-
ner for Best Musical, now run-
ning in its second season on
Broadway, will play the Power
Center on November 12-14 as
the opening. attraction in the
University Professional Theatre
Program Play of the Month
Series.

The Me Nobody Knows is bas-
ed on a book of the same title,
containing the writings of New
York ghetto schoolchildren. The
libretto was taken directly from
the book, as were the lyrics of
its twenty-one songs, including
the hit "If I Had A Million Dol-
lars".

...

O.K. Carson waits for Godot

WINNIPEG BALLET:
Royal young troupe
.'graces Power stage,
By DIANE TREW
Last night the Royal Winnipeg Ballet returned to Ann Arbor for
the third time since 1967 to make their debut in Power Center.
Known as an energetic and youthful company, they demonstrated
their further growth and versatility in a varied and forceful program.
The first work was "Pas de Dix," a standard Balanchine curtain
raiser. The familiar schmaltzy music from Glazounov's Raymonda
and the traditional choreography make it the type of vehicle that
suits a company which is noted for really "dancing to the audience"
projecting so that the back row in the theatre couldn't miss a move
of the raising of a dancer's eyebrow. Instead, the effect was rather

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cool. All the dancers seemed
somewhat stiff, and soloist Al-
exandra Nadal failed to project
across the footlights. Her solo,
consisting mainly of bourees
(like the Dying Swan), is noth-
ing if the upper arms, the back,
and the head are not used to
full advantage to convey the.
emotion that is so evident in the
music.
The men in the company, like
almost all Western companies,
were weak, which is.to say av-
erage or adequate. They part-
nered well, and the total effect
of Pas de Dix was pleasant if
not exciting.
Farhmore intreesting chore-
ographically as well as emo-
tionally was the second work,
"Sebastian." Here was an excel-
lent example of John Butler's
e r o tic modern choreography.
Surely no one can surpass Butlet
in inventiveness for translating
physical love into balletic terms.
The company did a better job
with this dramatic story of pas-
sion and sacrifice in seventeenth
century Venice. Louise was
touchingly sensual as the Cour-
tesan and S a 1 a t o re Aiello
seemed to be one of the very
few men in the company cap-
able of coming anywhere near
meeting the demands of Butler's
choreography. Aiello displayed
that combination of force and
flexibility that is mandatory for
a g o o d modern dancer. You
could feel his contractions; you
could flow with his fluid move-
ments.
The final work, "Rondo," was
a strange pastiche in rondo form
of everything from Mahler songs
to electronic music to "Scar-
borough Fair." Three quite lovely
lyrical movements were inter-
spersed with two disturbing sec-
tions of what passes for chore-
ographic. inventiveness today--
writhing dancers clutching spas-
modically and flailing about.
Again Aiello stood out from the
rest with his superior command
of modern technique.
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Nov. 11 & 18
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Sunday
Olivier's HAMLET
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Bowen Field House
TICKETS-$3.50, $4.50, $5.50
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in FEDERICO FELLINI'S
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