100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 8, 1971

PaeTw HEMCHGN AL

C-,,

.

ICI FOCS___ S W C__ ___
Possibilities with, color film

1

I'1

y- - - b Richard Lee

EDITOR'S NOTE: This question-
and-answer column, published week-
ly by The Daily, is written by Rich-
ardyLee, a local free-lance profes-
sional photographer. Lee is a mem-
ber of the National Press Photog-
raphers Association and his pictures
,. have appeared in national maga-
zines.
Questions may be mailed to Rich-
ard Lee, c/o The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard St.
Q. If I want color prints as
the end products, what kind of
film should I use?-Karnen M.
A. Kodak and most of the
other film manufacturers make
two basic types of color film
material. Most color film with
'chrome' in the name is color
transparency film. That is, after(
your film is processed it will
normally be returned with the
frames individually mounted as
slides.
The other kind of color film
with '-color' in its name is color
negative material. After pro-
cessing, the film has a very deep
orange mask, and the colors are
seen as their complements; for
example, red in the scene will
appear as green on the negative.
Hence, the only way to get a
proper record of the scene is to
have the negative proofed or
printed.
Both color films will pro-
duce prints, just as both will
produce slides. In addition,
black and white prints can be
made directly from color nega-
tives treating the color nega-
tives exactly as if they were
black and white negatives.
Slides, too, can be -made into
black and white prints but an
extra step is required.
Because of the chemistry re--
quired to print from color nega-
tive film, most color imperfec-
tions can be corrected easily,
but it is harder to manipulate
color prints from color slides.
Also, color negative materials
are more forgiving about over-
or underexposure, whereas color
transparency films almost al-
ways demand extremely accur-
ate exposure.
All color exposures should be
accurate within half a stop to
insure optimum results. If there
is any doubt as to whether the
exposure meter is functioning
properly or your use of it is cor-
rect, it is wise to shoot the same
scene at different exposures to
insure hitting the right one. In
this case a good rule of thumb
to remember is to oxerexpose
color negatives and underexpose
color transparencies. -
Q. Although my foreground
exposure seems correct in my
color slides, the sky usually
turns out a colorless white. Is
there anything that can be done
to retain the sky's blue and
have the clouds show up more
distinctly?
A. Yes, the problem can be
solved easily with a polarizing
filter, which costs about $8-15
depending on make and filter
size.
Polarizing filters work sim-
plest with a single lens reflex
camera because you can se the
effect of the filter directly
through the lens.
Not only will the filter cause
the sky to retain it's blue hue,
but it can also be used to screen
out reflections from surfaces
like store windows. polished
wood cabinets, or water. Be-
cause unwanted reflections are
being screened out, the color
emitted from the object will
seem richer, more vivid.
Polarizing filters are smokey
gray in color and hence suitable
for use with color as well as
black and white film. They usu-
ally necessitate an increase in
exposure of about 1/ to 2 stops,
depending on the make.
If a red filter is used in ad-
dition to the polarizing filter

1 '

when shooting black and white
film, day can be transformed
into night. If filter factors are
used in getting the correct fore-
ground exposure, everything
will be normally recorded except
for the blue sky which becomes
almost black in the print.
To get the most out of a po-
larizer, the sky has to be ab-
solutely clear, not overcast. The
filter functions best when it is
aimed 90 degrees to the light
source. And because the filter
can be rotated, it can act as a
variable density filter for the
sky, without altering the in-
tensity of the foreground colors.
* * *
Q. What do you know about
infrared film?-John D.
A. It is available in most
photo stores but until lately it
has been a pain in the neck to
get it processed. Kodak, which
markets, Ektachrome Infrared
Aero film in 20 exposure lengths
in 35 mm cassettes will now
accept the film for processing.
They also have beefed up their
black and white infrared film
and it is now known as High
Speed Infrared, with a speed
increase of two stops compared
to the old film.
Kodak Ektachrome Infrared
Aero film was originally pro-
duced for camouflage detection
by aerial photography. It has
three image layers sensitized to
green, red and infrared as op-
posed to blue, green and red in
ordinary color film. It records
the visible spectrum in "false
color." The only thing that is
predictable is that healthy fo-
liage appears bright red in color
infrared film and snowy white
in black and white infrared.
It is a fascinating film to ex-
periment with for those inclined
towards odd-ball effects or a
need to boast about using a film
that most other protozraphers
have not found a practical use
for. Commercially it is used in
areas ranging from camouflage
detection to ecology and ar-
chaeology. For further details
consult Kodak's AppliedInfra-
red Photography, two ,dollars at
the photo stores.
Q. What is the fastest color
slide film available?-Ann B.
A. How about Anscochrome
500? As the name implies, the
ASA rating is a whopping 500.
But don't expect fine grain!
However, Kodak's Ekta-
chrome-X and High Speed Ek-
tachrome, respectively rated as
ASA 64 and ASA 160 can be
push processed, via paying an
extra dollar for a Kodak ESP
envelope, and given a higher

speed rating of ASA 160 and
ASA 400.
What is "push processing?"
It is the control exercised in
developing to compensate for
underexposures when shooting.
When you underexpose at the
camera, you're in effect assign-
ing your film a higher speed
rating than the manufacturer
suggested necessary to obtain
optimum quality results.
A higher effective film speed
can be obtained by using spe-
cial speed compensating de-
velopers for black and white
film or extending the develop-
ment time for both color and
black and white films.
But leaving the film in the
soup for one hour instead of the
recommended few minutes does
not mean you will be able to
rate your film at an astrono-
mical ASA 1,000.000!
Films can only be pushed so
far before fog levels become too
much of a factor,, or before
grain becomes the size of golf
balls !
Quadrupling the ASA rating
(in effect pushing up by two f
stops) should be about the limit
to get negatives of printable
quality. Push processing is
available only for black and
white films and commercially
developed Ektachrome-X and
High Speed Ektachrome in 35
mm or 120 size. It is not avail-
able for Instamatic 126 cas-
settes.
It is also not available for
color negative films. The high-
DIAL 8-6416
MEET GINGER
Her weapon is
her body... She /
can cut you, kill
you or cure you!
COLOR by Deluxe 'ISOTO N
SHOWS TODAY
AT
7:00-9:00 p.m.
SOON
"Hellstrom Chronicle"

est speed rating available for
color negative films is Kodak's
Ektacolor and Fuji's Fujicolor,
both at ASA 100.
Kodak's Kodacolor-X, the
film most commonly used by
amateurs, is rated at ASA 80.
But don't use Ektacolor CPS
Professional film just to get the
extra increase of ASA 20 if you
intend to get Kodak processing.
As it's name implies, it is meant
to be processed and printed by
color labs catering to profes-
sionals.
This doesn't imply that Ekta-
color is of professional quality
and Kodacolor can't deliver like
results. The distinction that has
caused this separation is the
two shades of orange masking
color.
Details of a photography
competition sponsored by UAC
will be announced in this col-
umn next week. It is open to all

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
A DOUBLE FEATURE
The Cabinet
of Dr. Caligari
AND
The Golem
THE CABINET OF DR. CALI-
GARI, DIR. ROBERT WIENE,
1919, is the exemplary state-
ment of German expressionism.
A SOMNABULIST N I G H T-
M A R E refracted through the
mirrors of the mental fantasy
of a madman.
THE GOLEM, DIR. PAUL WEG-
ENER, 1920. A medieval legend
of a creature which comes to
the aid of persecuted Jews.
NOTICE: THESE TWO SILENT
FILMS WILL BE ACCOMPA-
NIED BY AN ORIGI.NAL
PIANO SCORE PERFORMED BY
PIANIST DONALD SOSIN
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

non-professionals and students.
There will be two categories:
Color and black and white. En-
tries will be displayed in the
UGLI.
Marine Band
plays Sunday
The U.S. Marine Band, billed
as "The President's Own Band,"
will present two performances
sponsored by the Ann Arbor
Eastern and Western Kiwanis
Clubs at Pioneer High School
this Sunday, Oct. 10.
The world - renowned 45-
piece band, under the direction
of Col. Albert Schoepper, will
present a matinee of pop-style
music at 3 p.m. (tickets-$1.00)
and a concert of classical and
"old favorite" band numbers
at 7 p.m. (tickets - $2.00 and
$3.00).
Tickets are available at the
Pioneer High School box office
before the performances and
also at Ulrich's Bookstore and
the Packard branch of the Ann
Arbor Bank.
NOW SHOWING
ON WASHTENAW AVE.
1/2 MILES EAST OF
ARBORLAND-U.S. 23
DIAL 434-1782
MGM'S
FABULOUS
THREE
AT 6:30 & 9 P.M.
SAT. & SUN.
AT 1:30-4-6:30-9 P.M.
the ultimate trip
2:A SPACE
ODYSSEY Q

is petitioning new mem-
bers. Those who have ex-
perience in advertising
or business managing
should be sure to sign at
the Cinema Guild ticket
desk this week.

I

e.r

FREE Ai
Footballs

ANNOUNCING OUR NEW FALL POLICY!
GREAT NEWS FOR MOVIE FANS!
THE FREEZE IS ON SO WE'RE LOWERING
OUR PRICES TO SAVE YOU MONEY
EVERY FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
2 OR A CARLOAD
FREE! FREE! So load up
A free pass to the car or
the car with the wagon and
most people! $ 5came along
SEE SPECIAL AD FOR THIS WEEK'S PROGRAM!

lq
,qqq

., ,s

(Good As Long As Supply Lasts)
With the purchase of four delicious Arby's Roast Beef Sandwiches or four Giant
Super Arby's receive an ARBY'S MINI-FOOTBALL FREE.
ARBY'S-HOME OF THE ORIGINAL ROAST BEEF SANDWICH

3021 WASHTENAW AVE.
Near Platt Rd.
Ann Arbor

Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 10:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 10:30 a.m.-2 a.m.

,UAOI

Daystar

presents

As Great a Blues Show as There Could Be

B

KU

G

*1

AND

W-2 ',I Pk i ",

Box Offices Open 6:30
Show Starts at 7:00

r

7:00 & 9:15

75c

Sr t7RtVE"IN DRlVE"IN
IQ 668-7083<ILL . 483-6000
44 EXIT 169 AtKSON ROAD "EAST Of ICANTIon
WoCT [.x..Trsa onan ..._ MlfUl[iasaavruur

WEST OF ZEES ROAD

OPEN FRI., SAT., SUN.
NEW FALL POLICY
$2.50
per carload
"Diary Of A Mad
Housewife"
"I Love My Wife"
"Story of a Woman"
Program Rated R

-1

Warren Julie
Beatty Christie
"McCabe and Mrs.
Miller" R
Kirk Faye
Douglas Dunaway
"The Arrangement"
BONUS HIT
Patrick O'Neal
"Assignment to Kill"

STARTS WED., OCT. 13th
i WINNER OF6
ACADEMY AWARDS!
DO&YOR
Z~IIWAfiO

HOWLIN' WOLF
FRIDAY, OCT. 8
HILL AUDITORIUM
9 P.M.
$2.50, $3.50, $4.50
-Stanley Livingston
ADVANCE TICKETS
Mich. Union-Salvation Records/330 Maynard St. and 1103 S. Univ.

10

1-

A"E GET
ATTENTION

GENERAI"CINEMA CORPORATION, "

I

El

in

r

The University Musical Society presents:

f'

DOLMETSCH ISAXBY DUO
Carl Dolmetsch, Recorder, and Joseph Saxby, Harpsichordist

This Weekend
$1.50

i

Kate
McGarrigle
AND
Steve
Dawson
"everything about her is up

I

I

MONDAY, OCT. 11, IN
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

V

I

fa

0

I U U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan