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October 08, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Xmas Break in Mexico
Air- Fit.
craft Seats Carrier No. Routing Depart Return Price
149 Mod Air 105 D'Acapulco D 1/3 1'10 $199
Why not top off your Christmas holidays with a trip to exciting
Acapulco and return to classes with an enviable suntan? Price
above. includesrround trip airfare PLUS hotel accommodations.
(Airfare.only also available.) We also have 16 other flights to
choose from; for further info, please contact
UAC Travel, 2nd Floor, M Union, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 763-2147 or
Students International, 621 Church Street, Ann Arbor, 769-5790
open only to U-M faculty, staff, students & members of immediate family.
Alumni should call our offices for flights available.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
GRETA GARBO in
NINOJTC HKA
with MELVYN DOUGLAS
directed by Ernst Lubitsch
7 and 9 p.m., AUD. A, ANGELL}

Ells berg speaks

out

on

pen tagon

The following is an interview
with Daniel Ellsberg by Carl Nelson,
of the College Press Service, and
Frank Greer, Special Projects Di-
rector, National Student Association.
Greer: We should begin with
a history of your experiences in
the government, the work you
did with the Rand Corp., and
how that affected your view of
foreign policy and government.
Nelson: And specifically as
that related to your decision to
release the papers to the press.
Ellsberg: The reason I was
asked to be on the study that
came to be known as the Penta-
gon Papers was that I had
worked for the Department of
Defense on Vietnam in '64 and
'65 and had also spent two years
with the Department of State
in Vietnam. So by late '67, I
had spent three years working
on Vietnam.
552
-0554

Prior to that I had worked
for the Rand Corp. on a study
of decision-making and crises.
It I the position] gave me an
interest and experience in ana-
lyzing processes of governmen-
tal decision-making.
Ultimately I was authorized
access to the entire study, for
purposes of analysis. And at the
end of that I was an expert, in
the sense that I had read a.
7,000 page book that no one
else had read. I found that a
very lonely feeling.
The position was quite isolat-
ing because it gave me a point
of view on the nature of our
involvement that others could
not really be expected to under-
stand or share. It didn't seem
healthy for this country, for our
democracy, that there should be
only one, or a small handful of
such experts.

We are talking here about
decisions that involve the his-
tory of all of us-the history by
which our elected representa-
tives and their appointed offic-
ials got us into a major war. It
was something that I thought
every citizen needed to know
and certainly other members of
the government outside the ex-
ecutive branch needed to know.
T h e y weren't complicated,
they were facts of our experi-
ence and our decision-making
-the performance of the people
that had been elected or ap-
pointed. So, I felt-that it was
essential that Congress, in par-
ticular, make good decisions and
informed decisions-that Con-
gress should know a great deal
more about the background of
past decisions than the Execu-
tive had let them know.
Ultimately, I felt the same to

be true for the public, especially
after the last year or so which
has seen two more invasions
take place.under what were ob-
viously conditions of the same
kind of deception and executive
usurpation of authority that the
earlier decisions had shown.
That led me to the decision to
make, this information avail-
able to the public and the press.
Nelson: When did you make
that decision?'
Ellsberg: The decision with
respect to Congress was made
really almost a year and a half
ago. But I think that it was
really after the Laos invasion
this year that it seemed to be
urgent to give a still wider audi-
ence access to this material.
Greer: There has been a ques-
tion in the minds of the Con-
gressmen that met with you
recently about whether this

papers
study and its release mean that
there will be substantial change
in either the public's view of
wars of this type or the execu-
tive steps that leads us into
these wars.
Ellsberg: I believe that the
immediate change to be hoped
for is in the performance and
behavior of the current elected
representatives, particularly in
Congress. There is no one in the
country who has not a great
deal to learn from these papers,
and by that I mean to include
the President, and former presi-
dents.
I was disappointed to hear
Secretary of State Rusk a week
or two after they had come out
say that he had not yet had
time to look at the material.
But Secretary Rusk no longer
has the power to end the war.
(Continued on Page 10)
page three

Daniel Ellsberg

NEWS PHONE: 764-0
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-

Sf.& .& rii!3an

Batty

NEXT WEEK: Gunga Din and the
Hound of the Baskervilles

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, October 8, 1971

-- -----------------

K) ADULTS ONLY

I

&' IT HAS TAKEN 2,000 YEARS, THE PRESIDENT'S
COMMISSION...AND 12 RULINGS BY THE SUPREME
COURT TO ALLOW YOU, A CONSENTING
A T%11 T TACCC lip LAn ki trYI IPE

SADULT, TO SEE THi MIJlQN riCu
PLUS "OF SIN A NO
c~inma
C-

t. V

SEX"
482-3300
FR E LIGHTED a
PARKING

nesbriefs
By The Associated Press
BRIAN FAULKNER, Northern Ireland's prime minister, and
Britain's Edward Heath met in London yesterday night and
issued a joint statement concerning the immediate dispatchment
of 1,500 additional troops to Belfast.
The statement said that the additional troops will permit the
British army commander in Ulster to crush terrorism in Northern
Ireland and tighten up his control of the Irish border to the south.
Both governments claim that Irish Republican Army (IRA) ter-
rorists are receiving sanctuary and most of their weapons from the
south.
The tough new British action was sparked by the growing wave
of terrorism, bomb throwing and slaying of civilians and British
troops.
Terrorism has cost the lives of 116 persons, including 26 troops
since August 1969.
THE AIR FORCE grounded more than half its fleet of C5
super transports yesterday after an engine on one of them fell
off while the plane was preparing for takeoff on Sept. 29.
Pentagon spokesman Jerry Friedheim denied a charge by Rep.
Clarence Long, (D-Md.) that the Pentagon delayed announcement
of the mishap until Wednesday after the Senate approved another
$472 million for the plane. He said it was reported in Oklahoma
and apologized for not making it known in Washington.
The world's largest and most expensive aircraft - at $60 million
each - the C5 flies regular cargo runs to Vietnam and Europe.
There was no indication how long the planes will remain grounded.
A FEDERAL GRAND JURY announced yesterday the in-
dictment of 40 U.S. meat inspectors, 3 meat processing companies
and 6 other persons in Boston on charges of bribery, perjury
and conspiracy.

Wholesale

price

to

Nixon

policy

WASHINGTON (R) - Wholesale prices dropped last
month by three-tenths of one percent, for the first time in
nearly a year. White House economists said it could be
credited to President Nixon's economic policy.

"The report on Septemb
news for all of us," said Arnol
on's Cost of Living Council th

er wholesale prices was good
:d Weber, staff director of Nix-
at administers the wage-price

-Associated Press

THE ALLEY PRESENTS
(330 MAYNARD)
SAT.-SUN., OCT. 9, 10
DR. ROSS
AND
LIGHTNIN SLIM
2 SHOWS EACH NIGHT (SAT. & SUN)

Hirohito in London
Emperor Hirohito of Japan plants a tree in the Royal Botanical
Gardens in London Wednesday. The tree was found yesterday
cut down beside a sign reading, "They did -not die in vain." The
incident was the most striking protest during the emporer's
three-day visit.
TAFT-HARTLEY ACT:
Strikers to return

drop attributed

i
I
I

SAN FRANCISCO (P) - T h e der issued Wednesday night by a
West Coast longshoremen's union federal judge.
yesterday ordered its 15,000 strik- U.S. District Court J u d g e

7:30 & 10:00

$2.25 ALL SHOWS

COMING:
OCT. 15, 16, 17A-ALBERT KING
OCT. 22, 23, 24-JIMMY REED
Advance Tickets for All Shows Now on Sale at SALVATION
RECORDS, 330 Maynard, 1103 S. Univ.-PINBALL IN THE
BASEMENT

The announcement emphasized that there were no charges against ing dock workers to return to Spencer Williams ordered the dock
any of the meat processors concerning unwholesome meat products their jobs tomorrow in response workers back for 10 days.
reaching the consumer. to aredena Hort order. A hearing on converting the
President Harry Bridges of the;tmoayrsaingrdrnoa
The indictments charge that the meat processors and individuals temporary restraining order mto a
bribed the inspectors to influence them in the performance permanent 80-day strike mora-
indicted briedth ispctrstomfuene he i epe ma Warehousemen's Union sent tele- torlum under the Taft-Hartley Act
of their duties. grams to all 28 locals instructing had been scheduled for today,
The alleged bribes, it was charged, included money, meat, liquor men to return with the first shift but was delayed until Oct. 15 by
and other items, dating back to 1962. One inspector was charged Saturday, 101 days after the re- U.S. District Court Judge William,
with taking between $54,500 and $70,500 in bribes. cord walkout began. Sweigert.
Bridges' telegram, released by,
A federal spokesman said a new 'staff of inspectors has been:the ILWU, said the union's strike It is estimated the strike has
assigned to the Boston area to replace those indicted. The 40 in- strategy committee voted unani- cost affected states more than
dicted are more than half of the 75 assigned to this area. mously to respect a restraining or- $1.7 billion.
TT 117wTTis seeiug a n 47'd nor

.
.
l
i
t
a
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i
,'
s
t,
i
t
1
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.
.
s
1
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freeze.
The report covered the first full month of the freeze
that went into effect Aug. 16 and expires Nov. 13.
It was issued a few hours be- -
fore Nixon was due to go on ra-
dio and television and outline the
second phase of his anti-inflation
poram.
The Bureau of Labor "Statis-
tics said the drop in average
wholesale prices of food, indus-pr
trial raw materials and manu-
factured goods was figured at
four-tenths of one per cent on a
seasonally adjusted basis, largest ]1
decline on that basis in five years.
The decline brought the Whole-
sale Price Index down to 114.5, WASHINGTON (R) - The Sen-
meaning it cost wholesalers ate yesterday backed by a 51-
$114.50 on the average last month 32 vote President Nixon's six-
for wholesale goods worth $100 month postponement of a federal
in the base period four years ago. pay raise as part of his anti-in-
The index was 3.2 per cent flation efforts.
above a year ago. The vote was the first in the
"This is encouraging evidence Senate on any phase of Nixon's
of the cooperation by all Ameni- new economic policy. The Presi-
cans with the wage-price freeze," dent won another iajor victory
Weber said. He added that it con- in Congress Wednesday when the
firmed reports of the Office 'of House approved tax cuts he urged
Emergency Preparedness and the to spur the economy.
Internal Revenue Service of gen-
eral compliance by businessmen The twin triumphs were scored
with the price freeze. just ahead of Nixon's radio-tele-
The price drop was due large- vision broadcast announcing the
ly to a 1.4 per cent drop in food wage-price restraints he will put
prices, including raw farm pro- into effect after the expiration of
ducts that are not covered by the the 90-day freeze he ordered in
freeze, and in part to imported August.
goods which are subject to Nixon's In the Senate fight over the
temporary 10 per cent tax sur- pay raise issue, pleas to support
charge, the bureau said. the President's anti - inflation
Industrial prices, which most moves won out over arguments
economists views as a more sig- that federal employes were be-
nificant indicator of permanent ing treated unfairly.
price movements than the fre-
quently fluctuating food prices, However Wednesday, the Son-
dropped one-tenth of one per cent ate went on record in a 60-27 vote
for the first decline in more than as favoring pay raises for govern-
three years. ment employes comparable to
those permitted in private indus-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man- try under the second phase of
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second Nixon's economic program.
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, U n d e r legislation Congress
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- passed last year, federal employes
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by were due to get a raise of about
carrier, $11 by mail. sxprcn nJn .TePei
'Summer Session published Tuesday six pe c s da. The Pres
through Saturday *morning. Subscrip- dent ordered this delayed for six
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail. months.

a

id

TODAY AT
1,3,5,7&9

DIAL
5-6290

6

The story of a g mbling nmn and a hustling lady and the
empire they fashioned from the wilderness.

n

x-7

I
i
i

> 0D17 YY.0DY46(Y* o
F Friday Saturday
0 MANCHILD
>0 FOOD-DRINK-ENTERTAINMENT
S1 .1 a.m. -2 a.m.
208 W. HURON +
761-0110
DY* EY+DYSEY. ODY54Y

The ILWU is seeking a 37.4 per
cent wage boost to $5.98 per hour
over two years ,a $500 monthly
pension for men retiring at 62
with 25 years service and sole'
jurisdiction over off-dock c o n-
tainer handling, which the Team-
sters Union also claims.
SEVEN
SAMURAI
"not only Kurosawa's
most vital film ...
perhaps the best
Japanese film ever"
-Donald Richie
TONIGHT-Nat. Sci.
7 &9:30 p.m. $125
Michigan Film Society

=I-

zLn:s ~: i '-c^asiz:;sa::ri

f i :ax to x

61

AT LAST IT'S HERE
Open 12:45 Daily!
Shows at
1,3,,7, 9p.m.

_ '* ""SiiiiipS: E aii / /J
S o*4~ flF AS
LOVE 1

"SOME
OF YOU
WILL
HATE THIS
PICTURE,
SOME WILL

At State & Liberty
DIAL 662-6264

LOVE IT, MOST
COU ARE GOING
O HATE IT AND
' AT THE SAME
I DID, BUT NOT

THE CRITICS
AGREE:
"BRILLIANT"
-Newsday
"SHOCKING"
--Unger, Ingenue
"IMPORTANT"
-Show
"The polarization of
American society is

COLUMBIA PICTURES
Presents
A BBS PRODUCTION
A Film by
JACK NICHOLSON

I is

I

i

U I

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