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January 13, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-13

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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST."
-Bella Abzug -Shirley Chisholm
-Tom O'Horgon -John Simon
"TRIUMPHANT! IT WILL FASCINATE YOU!"
-Judith Crist, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
"A FILM NOT TO BE MISSED!"
-Jerry O'Connell, SHOW MAGAZINE
"IF YU SEE NO OTHER FILM THIS YEAR, SEE
SACCO AND VANZETTI."
-Kevin Saunders, ABC-TV
What you DON'T know about the Sac-
co and Vanzetti murders will stun you.
The anatomy of the most infamous
trial of the century.

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

;Alb, r rigttn

Batty

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan NIGHT EDITOR: PAT BAUER Thursday, January 13, 1972

V7a.

busing ruling: Precedent for

..

By ARTHUR LERNER
In a precedent setting ruling, a fed-
eral judge Monday ordered Richmond,
Virginia and its two surrounding coun-
ties to consolidate their school systems
to end segregation, anticipating an ex-
pected metropolitan busing order for
Detroit area schools.
In the first federal court decision
breaking down political boundaries to
alleviate classroom segregation, U. S.
District Judge Robert Merhige Jr. or-
dered busing of students between the
mostly black Richmond city' schools
and the predominantly white schools
of two adjoining counties.
In a similar suit in Detroit, U.S.
District Judge Stephen Roth last fall
McCracken
resumes 'U'
position
By ANDY FEENEY
Paul McCracken, who re-
tired in December from his
post as chairman of the Pre-
sident's Council of Economic
Advisors, has returned this
term to his position as pro-
fessor of business adminis-
tration here.
McCracken, who announced
his resignation from the Coun-
cil last November, expressed "a
certain schizophrenic feeling"
about leaving the government
and returning to the University.
"I've always enjoyed teaching"
he said, in an interview t h i s
week.
"The opportunity to get back
into the classroom is one I real-
ly look forward to. But one
doesn't live in the center of ac-
tivity, as I did in Washington,
without feeling a certain
amount of decompression upon
leaving," he said.
McCracken, appointed by
President Nixon in 1969, w a s
chairman of the economic ad-
visory council during some of
the most tumultuous years t h e
council has faced since its crea-
tion during the Eisenhower ad-
ministration.
He was originally hailed by Prof.
Nixon as a "centrist" because of Econ
his belief that both monetary week
and fiscal policy should be used
in regulating the economy, al-
though McCracken tended tojSGC
favor monetary policy. He is
considered to be a proponent ofj
a balanced federal budget, while
allowing for deficit spending
during periods of recession.
McCracken will conduct a
seminar for doctoral students
this semester, in addition to
teaching a course in business
conditions for the University,
but he said plans beyond t h a t
were still amorphous. The
"My job - my career objec- panics
tive - is to resume academic list su
life," he said. "On the o t h e r Govern
hand, one of the attractions of the na
academic life is that it is a of 224u
less structured existence an d ing in
permits a bigger range of ac- At t]
tivity." thetse
He said some of his time to aut]
would be spent in the study of this li
national energy policy, examin- appear
ing both the adequacy of the Studen
nation's energy supplies and the The
effect of energy policy on the sible le
environment. He said he does their r
not plan to become involved in origina
any kind of partisan politics, lice hi

found city, state, and federal officials
guilty of creating de jure segregation
in Detroit's schools. He ordered the
State Board of Education to devise a
metropolitan Detroit integration plan
by Feb. 1.
Before ruling on inter-district bus-
ing between Detroit and its suburbs,
Roth may order crosstown busing
within the Detroit city limits in time
for the September school year. Cross-
town busing within Detroit could prob-
ably begin even while under appeal.
Inter-district busing or a consolidation
plan - as more precedent setting rul-
ings - might be delayed awaiting
resolution only through lengthy ap-
peals in higher courts.

Roth's decision last fallivas a land-
mark ruling in that it found what was
previously considered de facto segre-
gation to be de jure, by law, segrega-
tion. His decision was based on housing
and loan practices and school con-
struction policies of various city, state
and federal officials and agencies.
Merhige's decision goes further than
the plans Roth has been expected to
consider in seeking an acceptable ra-
cial balance in Detroit area schools.
By ordering consolidation of districts,
Merhige's order supersedes any inter-
district busing order which would not
affect hiring, administration, funding
and policy-making within the separate
school districts.

Instead, the Richmond decision elim-
inates the school districts themselves,
places them within one consolidated
district, and orders busing within the
new 100,000 pupil school system.
If sustained on appeal, the Rich-
mond decision and the forthcoming
Detroit ruling could signal similar rul-
ings in other Northern cities where
the National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People has al-
ready initiated court proceedings.
As in Richmond, most Detroit school
children are black, while the majority
of the suburban students are white.
However in Richmond the court-
ordered consolidated system has only

Governor announces

etro it?
about one-tenth the number of pupils
in the 80 Detroit area school districts.
A similar consolidation plan in the
Detroit area might include only nine
or ten districts but would involve
either a challenge to current state law
or a bitter popular vote.
A state assistant attorney general
has noted that if Judge Roth orders
school consolidation in the Detroit
area, Michigan law requires referen-
dum approval of the residents of the
districts involved.
The Richmond school board, pre-
veiouslythe defendantk ina segrega-
tion case, joined with black plaintiffs
See VA., Page 6

expected

cut in state

appropriations to

'U

umCPICTURES pm.enI GIAN MARIA VOLONTE . RICCARDO CUCCIOLLA " CYRIL CUSACK
ROSANNA FRATELLO * GEOFFREY KEEN .;, MILO O'SHEA .,we oR.E
SACCO & VANZETTIw- WILULAM PRINCE " CLAUDE MANN smsw,,op FABRIZIO ONOFRd
w ~GIULIANO MONTALDO * Thrwe Saw imby JOAN BAEZ -"w 'eo' w JOAN BAEZ-saw DoMORRICONE
HARRY COLOMBO .M GEORGE PAPI or GIULIANO MONTALDO sitr m .,q
TECHNICOLORS o.. E UIIMC PICTURES .e**ist.f UamasA M aRcoo.,an RCA Rfcottd

oPo'TH OFrUM
#IP14P AVENU .AT LBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 76-9700

SHOWS 7 & 9
FRI. 7-9- 11

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

--Daily-Sara Krulwich
Paul McCracken, former chairman of Nixon's Council of
omic Advisors discusses fiscal policies in an interview this
ATTEMPT RARRED:
Printer shunls

AL

A

A

A

By SARA FITZGERALD
In a long-expected move,
Gov. William Milliken has or-
dered a two-per cent cutback
in spending by state agencies,
and institutions of higher ed-
ucation in order to balance
this fiscal year's state budget.
This means a cut of almost
$11/2 million for the Univer-
sity.
The announcement two weeks
ago came as no surprise to Uni-
versity officials who had been
forewarned for several months of
possible cuts up to three per cent.
The University will make up for
the cuts - totalling $1.45 million
for the Ann Arbor campus - by
continuing to follow steps taken
in anticipation of the cutbacks.
These steps include not spend-
ing approximately $1.5 million
in non-salary accounts, for items
such as equipment purchases, ac-
cording to Allan Smith, vice pres-
ident for academic affairs.
Deans and department chair-
men will also continue to explore
ways in which funds in their areas
may be cut, Smith said. "We are
just in the proces of working with
each unit to designate these
areas.'
Should state revenues eitherj
pick up or decline, Milliken can
still restore some state funds or
order a further one per cent cut-
back. However, Smith believes
both possibilities are "unlikely."
While some state agencies, gird-
ing for a three per cent cutback,1
regarded the two per cent cut as a
savings, the University will still
have to maintain austerity mea-
sures, even if no further cuts are
made. Other areas of revenue, ac-
cording to Smith, such as income
from student fees, may also be
down-further necessitating the
University's austerity plans.
In making the cutback, Milli-
ken revealed that last year's $2
billion state budget showed aE
"razor-thin" surplus .of $700,000.
Milliken had ordered two cut-
backs totalling one-and-a-half per
cent to balance that budget.
ThebMichigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan.News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,1
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-;
-tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mall.

Vice President Smith

'U' eases regulations
of Michigan residency
Tly state's new 18-year-old age of majority law has
brought changes in University residency requirements, al-
lowing students between 18 and 21 to establish in-state
-residency by living in Michigan for six months before they
enroll.
At their December meeting, the Regents lowered the
required age for this rule from 21 to 18. Previously, the
residency of such students followed that of their parents.

Gov. Milliken

"HIGHEST RATING61'DOLLARS' IS THE WHOPPING
FUN PICTURE OF THE YEARI It's Richard
Brooks' sly, subtle and hilarious account of an
elaborately-planned, successfully executed rob-
bery of a bank in Hamburg. THIS IS THE SEASON
TO BE HAPPY AND JUST 60 TO SEE '$' (Dollars)
AND BE HAPPYI" -WANDA HALEew Yk Dailyw
"'$' (Dollars) IS A HUMDINGER I ABSORBING ALL
THE WAY AND VERY GRATIFYING IN WHO GETS WHAT
--AND WHOMI TOP QUALITYl"-rrCRSTrjewYIrkagz.e
"' (Dollars) boasts an attractive cast, some
clever dialogue and lots of suspense. Everybody
does well, but Goldie Hawn does marvelously well 1"
-ROGER GREENSPUN, TheNewYork Tihee
"In '$'the caper is only the beginning of one
of the wildest chases this side of Hitchcockl
'to doughnuts, you won't be bored I"
-BERNARD DREW, Gannett News Servike
"$'IS WORTH YOUR INVESTMENTI A slick,
fast-moving, nicely-packaged caper storyl Contin-
ually excitingI"ft-JEFFREY LYONS, WPX-TV

undercover

ii

By CHARLES STEIN
ey privateprinting com-
have refused to publish a
ubmitted by the Student
ment Council containing
mes and phone numbers
undercover agents operat-
the state of Michigan.
heir' last meeting before
mnesterabreak, SGC voted
horize the publication of
st. It was scheduled to
in the council's paper
it Action on Dec. 14.
Printers cited fear of pos-
gal action as the basis of
efusal, since the list was
ily stolen from State Po-
eadquarters in Lansing.

Police officials have warned that
anyone publishing the list would
be guilty of a felony.
The list first made news when
it was reported that an East
Lansing underground paper call-
ed the Joint Issue had access to
two copies of the list. The edi-
tors of the paper tried to put it
in their own publication, but
their printers refused to publish
it.
It did circulate on the Mich-
igan State campus, however, in
a pamphlet called "Know Your
Local Police."
At the time of the council de-
bate on the subject, council
member Joel Silverstein stated
that he had personally contact-
ed nine .lawyers and all agreed
that the publication of the list
would constitute no legal viola-
tion.
These assurances were not
enough to satisfy Grand Blanc,
the council's regular publisher,
CAPCO, a Detroit based printer,
and a "movement" printer from
Chicago. The council is present-
ly in contact withanother out-
of-state publisher, but no agree-
ment has as yet been reached.

The residency of students
determined by this policy.
"The change results from the
recent legislation lowering the age
of majority from 21 to 18," ac-
cording to Allan Smith, vice pres-
ident for academic affairs.
"We feel we have no logical al-
ternative to lowering our age of
eligibility for establishing resi-
dence accordingly," he said.
For students who drop out to
establish residency the change
could represent more than $700
saved each term - the differ-
ence between in-state and out-of-
state tuition for undergraduates.
In addition, the regulations
were changed so that all full-time
University employes and their de-
pendents may register as in-state
students. Previously only members
of the teaching staff and their de-
pendents were afforded this priv-
ilege.
The change came, according to
Smith, so as not to discriminate
against classes of University em-
ployes.

Welcome Back
from
The Ann St. Pizza People
1031 E. ANN
761-1111
"LUKE" Program information 8-6416 "KLUTE"
Tonight at n Tonight at
7P.M. 9 P.M.
in an alan jpaKuia
s, r<production.

under 18 will continue to be
Kansas rules
tuition cut to
young voters
A recent ruling by a Kansas
judge that students registering to
vote in college towns do not have
to pay out-of-state tuition would
drastically affect the University
if ever extended to this state.
Such a decision could ultimately
cost the University several mil-
lion dollars in student fees. ,
Kansas District Judge William
Ryan, in a case involving a com-
munity junior college student,
ruled last week that a teenager
who registers to vote in a college
town becomes a citizen of that
town and i no longer subject to
additional out-of-state tuition
fees.
The judge based his decision on
the theory that the enfranchise-
ment of the 18-year-olds ends his
legal subservience to his parents,
including the view that their home
is his residence.
Max Bickford, executive secre-
tary of the Kansas Board of Re-
gents predicted the question would
soon come before courts in every
state and ultimately would be de-
cided by federal courts.
If all of the University's out-of-
state students began paying in-

INTENSIVE CAMPAIGN

tf.
fj .
t: 1

"CAPER, CHASE
AND ENDING TWIST
...ALL ARE 600DI"
-LEONARD HARRIS.CBS-TV

NPAC begins ednca

By JANET GORDON
The Steering Committee of the
National Peace Action Coalition
(NPAC) met in Detroit last week-
end to launch an intensive educa-
tional campaign focusing on the
question "Is the war really wind-
ing down?'
The NPAC committee, composed
of about 220 people chosen at a
convention early last month, in-

recent heightening of the air war
over Indochina.
Detroit NPAC coordinator, Bon-
nie Garvin, described the plans.
"The educational campaign will
center around a speakers' bureau,"
she said. "The goal is to get na-
tionally known figures and other
experts into many comm unities
and high schools to discuss the
necessity for total withdrawal from
Tndinhin " Brnehres ahot the

(ion drive
supporter active in the peace
movement for the past 50 years.
Speakers at the January 17 New
York fund-raising dinner will in-
clude: Daniel Ellsberg, the man
who admits leaking the Pentagon
Papers to the press; John Cary,
spokesman for the Vietnam Veter-
ans Against the War; Rep. Bella
Abzug (D-N.Y.); and Tom Wick-
er of the New York Times.
After the national plans of the

Ii iflDDcnrf~,mflic

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