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January 13, 1972 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-13

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i nursday, January 13, 1972

rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page "

inursday, January 13, 191Z VHE MICHIGAN DAILY " Page4 ~? -

I

MASS LAYOFFS:

LSA names

new dean ;

U I.!

WSU facuity protests possible
RoE -Lnued teacher dismissal

By ROBERT SCHREINER,
The 'Wayne State University
Federation of Teachers held a
news conference yesterday pro-
testing the possible dismissal of
nearly 400 non-tenured faculty
members and academic staff next
year.
The conference at the Detroit
Press Club came the day after
about 100 WSU faculty and staff
Sinclairre;c

members marched up to the of- minate in June received letters
fice of acting university president from the administration stating i
George Gullen. one of three things: Some were
The group had a 15-minute told outright they will not be re-
meeting with Academic Vice hired next fall, some that they
President Ali Cambel, and left will not be rehired unless suf-
vowing to attend a meeting of the ficient funds are available, and
WSU Board of Governors today. still others that they may not be |
Last month, 396 of WSU's 605 rehired but funds are being sought1
faculty members and academic to support them.
staff who have contracts that ter- Prcuident Gullen cited a $4.6
million deficit in the school's bud-
I " 7 get at the end of the year as the
sed rom ja reason for the letters.
If all of those who received1

in charge of curriculum
(Continued from Page 1) University. He has only been
Instead, Witke favors "maintain- professor here since last August.
ing coverage of the basics," while Rhodes, however, views Witke
trying to develop offerings in "the lack of experience at the Unive
centers of student interest." sity as an asset rather than a li
"We respond to crises in edu- bility. Witke, he said, "will n
cation but don't forsee them very be hamstrung" by keeping to th
well," he said. "One of my tasks traditional University ways of d
will be to isolate areas where fu- ing things.
ture trends will be and elicit sug- Further, he said, Witke has ha
gestions from faculty in the ap- experience with "curriculum d
propriate areas." velopment" at the Universityc
Witke's appointment may have California at Berkeley, and ha
been somewhat surprising because just come from the State Unive
of his relative neweness to the sity of New York at Binghamtoi
s a school described as "active"i
developing new curricula.
HEW robe

a'
r-
a-
ot
,he
o-
ad
e-
of
as
)n,
in

Rescheduled
JEFFERSON
AIRPLANE
tomorrow night
Jan. 14th
Crisler Arena-9 P.M.
Tickets purchased last
November will be honored
UN-HYPOCRITICAL MORALITY
Based on Bertrand Russell's
views, Morals Without Mystery,
by Lee Eisler, offers a liberating
alternative to established
morality. Russell called it "a
well-written short presentation
of the kind of morality I believe
in and advocate."
Russell's rational morality is
capable of winning universal
acceptance because it aims to
satisfy universal desires; because
it favors no one group over
another; and, most important in
a world of nuclear armaments,
because it provides a method of
resolving moral disagreements.
$4.95
Philosophical Library, Publishers

f
4
/
+i
1
i

(Continued from Page 1) carcerated at Southern Michigan letters are not rehired, it would
Sinclair was arrested in Janu- State Prison in Jackson and the mean a 24 per cent cutback from (Continued from Page 1)
ary, 1967, charged with posses- maximum security, prison at Mar- WSU's present faculty and aca- of the Commission for Women,;
sion and sale of marijuana to two quette. Sinclair currently has a demic staff of 1,652. which is currently processing theI
undercover agents. The sale civil rights suit before the federal At yesterday's news confer- early results of their own review.
charge was thrown out once the district court in Detroit charging ence, spokesmen for the teachers' According to spokeswoman Sal-
case came to trial on the grounds authorities at Jackson prison with federation demanded that all of ly Buxton, the commission's file
of entrapment, but Recorder Court discriminatory treatment against the letters be rescinded, that review procedure was "approved
Judge Robert Colombo upheld the him on the basis of his political( there be no layoffs of competent and verified by the University's
possession charge, sentencing Sin- beliefs. faculty members and academic executive officers. However, the
clair to nine and a half to ten The original charge of Mari- staff, and that Gullen step down individual attention spent on each
years in prison. juana possession has been ap- from office if the first two de- case appeared too time consum-
Colombo's decision ended two pealed twice since the Colombo de- mands are not met. ing to University officials, Buxton
years of court battles following cision. It was rejected by the state The teachers also called for a said.
Sinclair's arrest. Court of Appeals February 16, 1971 meeting between the entire WSU Nordin expressed dissatisfaction
and Sinclair is currently awaiting faculty and the administration with the new review because of its
Since then Sinclair has been in- a decision by the state Supreme and Board of Governors of the more limited nature. Each super-
Court, which heard the case last University. visor evaluates only within his own
11 Nov. 2. In addition, there were hints unit and not categorically between
C e iar loses Sinclair's release was the cul- of a possible class action suit schools and departments as the
mination of a four year campaign against the university, a protest at commission's procedure does, she
by the Rainbow People's Party to today's meeting of the Board of explained.
ax exem ption free Sinclair. Starting out locally, Governors, and a possible faculty Some commission m e m b e r s
(Contued from Page the campaign took on national pro- strike, voiced concern that the new re-
(erCont d mage i"We're going to close this shop view is an attempt to replace the
"University costs are going up con-I portions when the most recent don"oeWUtahrjoda omsinsonrve.Hw
statlyandto dd noter ostbenfitincude suh prsoaliiesreporter for the South lend, the ever, Nordin said, "If the Univer-
to students is wrong. We could as John and Yoko Lennon and sev- school's student newspaper. sity tries to abolish the file re-
have picked up the revenue very eral defendants from the Chicago Eward Sharps, an dassisant ie rodua t will be acting
Officials at University Cellar Surrounded by youthful support- man for the protesters said the wil
were also disappointed. "We're ers, Sinclair was asked immediate faculty is angry because ofe
disappointed to see it go," said ly upon his release, if he had manner in which the notices were
Webster. "It wasn't really a fair changed his views on marijuana. I given, because the faculty was not
advantage we had, but things "I want to smoke some joints!" consulted in advance and because
should have been made equal in Sinclair replied, educational problems would arise
the direction of saving students Since his release, Sinclair has from the cutback in teaching
money." Webster predicted that been "investigating the scene, talk- staff.
the Cellar's business would not be ing to former associates to find Gullen said the university had TONIGH
effected by the bill. out what going on," said Sinclair's taken the step with regret and
Ernie Bundy, manager of Ul- brother David. Sinclair was out of that it fully realized the cut-
rich's echoed sentiments similar town and unavailable for comment. backs would cause unhappiness.
to Webster. "I would have just as
soon seen it gone the other way

It's about time!
A calendar of men
for women.
Start the New Year with the most un-
usual calendar you've ever seen. The
1972 Calendar of Men for Women. A
photographic, not pornographic study of
12 unique men.
This is a large hanging calendar (13" x
191), 13 pages (including cover). It's the
first of its kind and will surely become a
collector's item.
Isn't it about time men became objects
for hanging?
Special student price $2.50. Nationally
advertised at $395.
--- ---------------~fn
Calendar, P.O. Box 827
Farmingdale, N.Y.1173S
Please rush--calendars at $2.50 ea. (plus
50 cents postage and handling). Enclosed
is my check/money order f -
print name
address
(okake check/M.O. payable to Calemium)

Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

P

UAC-DAYSTAR presents

- 7

Commander Cody,
and his LOST PLANET AIRMEN
Sundday, Jan. 23-Hill Aud.
$1-$1 .50-$2.00-$2.50
with:
BUDDIES IN THE SADDLE
and

T ONLY

4K DICK

l

so that no one would pay the tax,"
he said.
1""'
Lb7
4&i

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
BONNIE AND CLYDE
The story of two outlaws,
young and in love
in America
with WARREN BEATTY, FAYE DUNAWAY
and MICHAEL J. POLLARD
directed by ARTHUR PENN,
produced by WARREN BEATTY
SHOWN AT 7 AND 9
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
75c

WIM
W. C. Fields
DIR. EDDIE CLINE, 1940. Fields plays Egbert
Souse, the Black Cat Saloon's most frequent cus-
tomer.
PLUS A SHORT: OCCURENCE AT OWL CREEW
FRIDAY NIGHT
I, A MAN
DIR. ANDY WARHOHL, 1967. Tom Baker and
Ingrid Superstar.
Short: WHAT EVERY YOUNG BOY
AND GIRL SHOULD KNOW.
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
(MONROE AND TAPPAN)
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. 75c

THE BOOGIE BROTHERS

(Stephen & John)

TICKETS: MICHIGAN UNION
12 NOON-6 P.M.-MON.-FRI.
BOTH SALVATION RECORD STORES
IN YPSILANTI, NED'S BOOKSTORE

A

PLEASE-NO SMOKING IN CONCERT AUDITORIUM
900 Jefferson Airplane tickets were available as of Tues., Jan. 11.
Check at Daystar Ticket Counter in Lobby of Michign Union. 12
noon-6 p.m.
TICKET COUNTER 763-4553 DAYSTAR OFFICE 763-1107

I1

)
1

s

I

wo I

A

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
sky blue heathers bloom
for Miss J in College Town
separates. . .a now-to-spring
wardrobe done with flare and
pastel-power in smooth-knit
polyester/acrylic. Sizes 5-13.
A. Pull-on vest with
chambray pockets, $11.
Front-zipped pant, $16.
B. Yoked chambray shirt of
polyester/cotton, $10.
Front-pleated skirt. $13.
M,66 J~oj

ROSTROPOVICH
in Concert; Saturday evening
Honored the world over as one.of the great cello masters of
all time, Mstislav Rostropovich makes his third appearance
in Ann Arbor on. the stage of Hill Auditorium, Saturday,
January 15, at 8:30. His program includes "Adagio" by Bach; Beethoven's
Twelve Variations on a theme from "The Magic Flute" by Mozart, Op. 66;
the Sonata in F major, Op. 6, by Richard Strauss; and the Sonata
in C major, Op. 119, by Prokofieff.
Tickets available from $2.50 to $7.

A

m no

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