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February 29, 1972 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-29

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 29, 1972

PaeSxTH IHGA:AL

II

STUDY FILM IN LONDON, ENGLAND Ward Chapman
No Prerequisites MAY 7-JULY 3, 1972 W r n h pa
A UNIQUE AND EXCITING PROGRAM ARRANGED
THROUGH THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE CHIEF TRIAL LAWYER- GENESEE COUNTY
Film Performances at the Not'l Film Theatre PROSECUTOR'S OFFICE
A Lectures and Discussions by Directors,j
Actors, and Authorities on FilmA
. Lectures by Program Director 1
Prof. Marvin Feiheimon the Aesthetic teCnm H R SCTRSR L
and Cultural Significance of the Cinema TiE PROSECUTOR'S ROLE
Includes: Round trip air, hotel, meals of London restaurants, I SOCIETY
membership in BFI, tuition,fees, excursions, insurance.
MASS MEETING, TUES., FEB. 29-4 P.M.
MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING-AUDITORIUM 3 Wed.Ma h 1
Open to students and non-students ., arc , 4:15 p.m.
or Contact: STUDENTS ABROAD CLUB
211 Michigan Theatre Bldg. LAW LOUNGE
(Above Marilyn Shop)
662-6666
213 S. STATE ST.
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Cagrsinvade Ind~aesian a

By BOB HEUER
For those of you who thought
the Big Ten title race ended hap-
pily ever after with Michigan's
64-52 conquest of Minnesota last
Saturday, you'd better take a
closer look. Looming large on the
horizon of the Wolverine's title
dreams are the "also ran" Indiana
Hoosiers.
This is the same Indiana team
that was ranked fifth in the na-
tion in the pre-season polls: the
team that dropped out of sight by
mid-January and blew themselves
out of the Big, Ten race in the
first two weeks.
The Hoosiers are a team that
has come alive since mid-season,
too late to rekindle any title hopes
of their own, but certainly in time
to put a damper on anyone else's.
Michigan's cagers, basking in
the glory of first place all alone,
put their heads on the Hoosier
chopping block tonight in Bloom-
ington. A win will -put Michigan
in the driver's seat with only three
games left: a loss will throw the
Big Ten race back into a three-
way scramble.
THE HOOSIERS have been the
Big Ten's hottest team in recent
weeks, reversing early season
losses to Minnesota, Wisconsin,
and Michigan State and polishing
off Iowa and Illinois. A one point
loss at Purdue last Saturday was
Indiana's first in a month.
Coach Johnny Orr feels Michi-
gan is the worse for Indiana's
loss at Purdue. The Hoosiers' five
game win streak came to an end
when they blew a ten point lead
in the second half against the
Boilermakers.
"We'll have to play just as well
or better than we did against
Minnesota to win 'at Indiana,"
said Orr. "After their loss Sat-
r. . . . Sdc. :.. . . . . . . . ' {.
Big Ten Standings >?

urday they'll want to beat us in
the world's worst way."
Orr was in no way downplaying
Michigan's performance against
the Gophers. "I though we played
our best ball of the season in the
second half," he said. "We held
them to seven baskets and played
great defense overall. Wilmore
and Brady did the job and Ernie
Johnson gotdall nine of his points
in the second half."
The Hoosiers will field a vet-
eran team although minus soph-
omore George McGinnis who was
signed by the ABA's Indiana Pac-
ers last year. The team boasts
eight returning lettermen includ-
ing three starters.
Senior- Joby Wright leads the
team in scoring with a 21.3 av-
erage, followed by John Ritter and
Steve Downing with 15.8 and 12.6
points, respectively. Juniors Frafik
Wilson and Bootsie White round
out the Hoosiers' starting line-up.
It's been an up, down, and up
season for the Hoosiers this year.
Prior to their conference inaug-
ural, they were ranked seventh
nationally on the strength of eight
wins in nine games, including
championship honors in the Old
Dominion Classic in Virginia.
The Hoosiers then went into a
swoon, losing a non-leaguer to
Northern Illinois and their first
four conference games. They
made those four look like a bad

TI
6-8 Ernie Johnson
6-5 John Lockard
6-14 Ken Brady
6-6 Wayne Grabiec
6-3 Henry Wilmore

RE LINEUPS

13.3
12.9
11.0
13.2
23.6

F
F
C
G
G

21.3
15.8
12.6
8.0
5.7

Joby Wright
John Ritter
Steve Downing
Frank Wilson
Bootsie White

6-8
65
6-8'
6-3Y2
5-8

dream, winning the next five all
by substantial margins, before the
loss to Purdue.
First-year coach Bob Knight
has put the emphasis on defense
this year and the team has re-
sponded with a creditable aver-
age of 68.0 points allowed per
game. He also sees the fast break
as an important product of good
defense.
"EVERY TIME you take the
ball away from an opponent, you
gain a fast break opportunity,
"Knight declares. "The more
chances you have the ball, the
more chances you /have to score.
So in essence, a good tough de-
fense will make for a better of-
fense."
This simple philosophy does
little to explain the Hoosiers' er-
ratic play this year. The inability
to win on the road explains it in
part. The Hoosiers have absorbed
only one of their five conference
losses in the friendly confines of
their new Assembly Hall.

The Wolverines know how tough
Indiana can be at home. Last
year's Michigan team went to
Bloomington with an 8-0 record,
including a 'decisive early season
victory over the Hoosiers at Cris-
ler Arena. A crowd gone beserk
and some home grown officiating
helped mold a ten point defeat
and sent Michigan on their way
to the runner-up spot in the Big
Ten.
In other Big Ten action, last
Saturday, Ohio State stayed on
Michigan's heels with an over-
time victory at Northwestern.
ILLNIOIS TIED Wisconsin in
the battle for eighth place with a
91-86 victory over the Badgers.
Iowa nipped Michigan State
102-98 after a protest by black
students delayed the start of the
game. The protesters were asking
for the reinstatement of sus-
pended Minnesota players Corky
Taylor and Ron Behagen and ap-
proval of demands made by a
group of Black athletes.

GERVIN LEADS EMU:

Hurons surge

W L
MICHIGAN 8 2
Ohio State 8 3
Minnesota 8 3
Indiana 5 5
Purdue 5 5
Michigan State 4 6
Illinois 4 6
Wisconsin 4 6
Iowa 4 7
Northwestern 2 9
Tonight's games
MICHIGAN at Indiana
Michigan State at Wisconsin
Purdue at Minnesota
Illinois at Ohio State

Pct.
.800
.727
.727
.500
.500
.400{
.400
.4001
.364
.182

For the Student Body:
SALE
* Jeans
" Bells
" Flares
'/2 off
CHECKMATE

By BOB McGINN
Six years ago, Eastern Michi-
gan's basketball team was just
another nonentity among the
seemingly endless number of
Michigan small college quintets.
Who had ever heard of any-
thing about Eastern other than
its coeds?
Well, today Eastern is famous
for its basketball team as well
as for its girls. The Hurons have
swept past 18 straight oppon-
ents and are ranked fifth in the
NCAA Small College Division
rankings. It's been a long jour-
ney, but Eastern finally appears
to have found the roan to na-
tional recognition.
THE TURNABOUT C A M E
when Jim Dutcher took over the
coaching reins in 1966. Before
his appearance on the scene
Eastern always lost more than
it won. Under Dutcher the Hur-
ons have made gigantic strides.
They have won 20 or more
games five years in succession
and have been in a post-season
tournament each of the years.
A Michigan graduate, Dutcher
attributes Eastern's emergence
to a general increase in ath-
letic emphasis. "I just came
along at a good time," he mod-
estly says. "But his record of
123-47 indicates his role in
Eastern's rise to be much more
important than he is willing to
admit.
This season the Hurons drop-
ped their first three contests, all
on the road, to Toledo, Purdue,
and Michigan. The loss to the
Wolverines (89-88) marks the
second straight year Eastern has
given Michigan a titanic strug-
gle beforehlosing a hearbreaker.
After their rocky start the
Hurons reeled off three easy

Since then Eastern has gone
21/2 months without tasting de-
feat. Most of the wins have
been over patsies such as Earl-
ham, Chicago State, and North-
wood Institute. But they have
beaten several strong small
schools, notably Ashland and
Kentucky Wesleyan.
Certainly the highlight in their
18 game win skein was the Hur-
ons' conquest of powerful east-
ern independent Duquesne (17-
4). As usual, Eastern was forced
to play this ranked school away
from home.
In the past several years East-
ern has always had at least
one outstanding individual per-
former. Harvey Marlatt, Earl
Higgins, and Kennedy McIn-
tosh, now professional players,
have been the kingpins for
Dutcher. Now the Hurons have
another bluechipper leading
them who is probably the best
of the bunch. His name is
George Gervin.
A Detroit native, Gervin al-
most wound up with Long
Beach State and Coach Jerry

Upward
The fifth starter is 5-11
sophomore Gary Tyson. He has
been a big surprise for the Hu-
rons with his fine defensive
play and outside shooting aver-
aging 11 points a game.
Last week the Hurons receiv-
ed a NCAA small college tour-
nament bid which they quickly
accepted. Eastern will partici-
pate in the Great Lakes re-
gional, one of eight such divi-
sions in the country. Defending
champion Evansville also re-
ceived a bid, and they will host
both the Great Lakes regional
and the small college finals.
Next season Eastern will fin-
ally be granted NCAA major
college status because of their
admittance to the Mid-Ameri-
can Conference. Conference af-
filiation will be a great boost to
Eastern in their quest for na-
tional recognition.
At the present time Eastern
has great difficulties in sched-
uling competitive opponents
Bowen Fieldhouse seats just 4,-
400, which doesn't provide
enough monetary incentive to

4

"We'll play any major college team anywhere,
at any time." -EMU coach Jim Dutcher
,: , :. i " :Y } } .: }:L :S{": } }".4 :}n' .. {... ? .?}}}}}

(I ZI victories. They then lost a tough
road clash to Eau Claire State,
State Street at Liberty the number one small school in
the nation, by the narrow mar-
-_ _-_ _ gin of 79-76.
LSA EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL
ELECTIONS
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR
CANDIDATES FOR LSA EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
PRESIDENT-VICE PRESIDENTIAL SLATE
7 members-at-large for a full term
and
1 member-at-large for a half term
COME TO 3M, MICHIGAN UNION OR CALL 763-4799
Filing Deadline: Feb. 29, 1972, at 5:00 p.m.
ELECTION MARCH 21 and 22

Tarkanian, a tireless recruiter.
Gervin enrolled at Eastern for
his freshman year, but then had
a change of heart and went to
Long -Beach. "He only lasted
three days," remembers Dutch-
er. "I think he just wanted to.
play near home."
The super sophomore's statis-
tics reveal just how well he has
played. Gervin is averaging 30
points a game (5th in the na-
tion) while taking an average of
only 18 shots, and, is also haul-
ing down nearly 16 rebounds a
game. Gervin's brilliant 60 per-
cent shooting mark is made
even more incredible becausehe
is noted as an outside shooter.
His high rebound average is also
amazing because Gervin packs
only 170 pounds on his slim 6-8
frame.
THE OTHER TWO Hurons
who start up front are seniors
Earl Dixon (6-6) and Bill James
(6-5). Together they average 28
points a game and 21 rebounds.
Dutcher characterizes Dixon as
"our best fast break player and
a great leaper." James, accord-
ing to his coach, "is as good a
6-5 center as there is around."
6-4 junior Lindell Reason is a
starter at one of the guard
spots. Reason has been plagued
with injuries all season long and
has had a frustrating year. An
excellent playmaker, Reason is
scoring 15 points a game, five
less than last year. But the
Hurons' captain picked up 16
assists and 15 points last Sat-
urday night against Northern
Michigan and should be at full
strength for tournament play.

big-time teams. As Dutcher
says, "We'll play any major col-
lege anywhere, at any time." A
serious blow to the Hurons'
schedule and to fans in Wash-
tenaw County is the apparent
discontinuance of the Eastern-
Michigan game next year due to
Michigan's schedule commit-
ments.
The-MAC will help Eastern
in that it will provide them with
a home-and-home schedule with
top teams- and will also give
players and fans the added in-
centive of playing for a con-
ference title. Becoming a mem-
ber will also allow Dutcher to
grant 20 full scholarships, sev-
eral more than he has been al-
lowed to give over the years.
A SUCCESSFUL basketball
program is becoming more and
more synonymous with good re-
cruiting. Eastern has had little
luck in signing top out-of-state
prospects. Dutcher points to a
lack of national exposure and
an alumni which he describ~es-
as "mostly teachers who don't
have the money or the prestige
to influence top players." He
added: "Can you imagine us go-
ing into New York City and
trying to recruit someone like
Henry Wilmore? At the present
time it's just impossible."
So Eastern must be content
to harvest its players from the
Detroit area, a most successful
practice in recent years. East-
ern basketball is on the rise.
It's too bad the Hurons' sched-
ule doesn't allow them to show
how good they really are.
Good Work? Good Pay
On December 10 and 11, 1959
the Big Ten Basketball officials'
pay was raised to $100.
Ball Four
Mel Behney of Michigan State
led all Big Ten hurlers during the
1968 campaign by issuing 27 base
on balls.
! ...... 1 A . n . ..i

*

m

I

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