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February 29, 1972 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-29

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Tuesday, February 29, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, February 29, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

Frosh

flash

past

Green,

102-92

!The Texas, Wedge

MSU's Grady. .
.s. keeps winning
By RICH STUCK
GRADY PENINGER is a cool character. Grady Peninger is a
greedy man. Grady Peninger is a tough guy. Grady Pen-
Inger's team has just won his seventh consecutive Big Ten
wrestling championship.
After observing Michigan State's phenomenal streak on the
mat and talking to the coach himself it is not difficult to
understand why the Spartans are moving ahead in the sport
while the other teams seem to be at a standstill.
Peninger, besides being an excellent coach, is also a pro-
gressive one. He is in strong disagreement with the current
NCAA rule on grooming, one which does not allow hair to
exceed the collar of an ordinary shirt, and not to extend over
the ears. The rule also states that no mustaches shall be worn.
The State mentor thinks this rule is ruining the sport of
wrestling.
"We're Just chasing butterflies; kids with their styles
nowadays lose a little of their motivation when the first
thing they have to do in order to wrestle is cut their hair.
Peninger wonders "What the heck is wrong with side-
burns and hair over the ears? I'm against a beard, though,
because I got burned by one once. But there is nothing
wrong with long hair unless it is so long that it affects the
wrestler's performance."
Because Peninger is a progressive coach he is trying to
fight the rule rather than sit back and wait for something to
happen while at the same time making them cut their hair.
"I'm going to fight it at the NCAA meetings because it's out-
dated. In the 40's and 50's it was okay but if it isn't changed now
our sport will continue to go down the drain. A young man al-
most ostracizes himself by being a wrestler."
Peninger and his assistant Doug Blubaugh are no differ-
ent from most coaches as they realize the necessity of tough,
grueling work. Blubaugh boasts matter-of-factly that there is
no place in the country where the athletes are worked as had.
He should know what hard work is since he was an NCAA
champ at Oklahoma State.
To Peninger the key word is sacrifice. Peninger believes,
"We try to work them hard. At the beginning of the season
we had about a dozen guys who weren't ready to pay the price.
"We believe in complete self-sacrifice. In this day and
age it's hard to find a young man who is willing to sacri-
fice.". He sympathizes with his wrestlers along this line,
however, and this may be one reason why his teams have
stood head and shoulders above everyone else for the past
seven years. "It's really difficult for a wrestler to go back
to the dorm and be normal like the others. I realize that
it's pretty hard to come back from a rugged workout and
be able to drink only one glass of water."
Respect is an integral part of the Spartans' success. No
team can be a champion on hard work alone and the athletes
themselves consider Peninger a master at building respect. The
Big Ten 142 pound champion Tom Milkovich says there is
an atmosphere of mutual respect on the team. "On many teams
it Isn't a two-way street. On our squad there is a coach-respect-
team relationship and also a team-respect-coach attitude. This
gives us a freer frame of mind and I think we learn quite a bit
as a result."
Milkovich also praises Peninger and Blubaugh as being
great on the technical aspects of wrestling. "They know what
we need to work on. If we need work on takedowns they are
right on the spot with some helpful points. If we need escapes
they'll have us work on them."
Both Milkovich and two-time defending NCAA 118 pound
champ Greg Johnson think an added ingredient that helps the
teamimmeasurably is the great combination Peninger and Blu-
baugh form as a coaching duo. "They complement each other
real well," says Johnson, while Milkovich adds, "They're a great
team working together."
There is little to argue about concerning the powerhouse
Peninger has turned the Spartans into. He has been at State
12 years and in that time the Green Men have won seven Big
Ten titles in a row as well as bagging the NCAA crown in
1967. Under Peninger, Michigan State has become to Big Ten
wrestling what Michigan and Newt Loken have become to gym-
nastics and what DocsCounsilman and his fantastic Indiana
Hoosiers have been in swimming.
Don't get it in your heads, though, that all of these titles
in a row start to be a little boring. Peninger makes it em-
phatic that this is not the 'case. "It doesn't get boring; this one
Is Just seven times more gratifying than the first one."
Maybe it would be good for the other coaches in the
conference to take notice of the winning philosophy in-
stalled by Peninger at the East Lansing school. Although he
is doubtless a top notch recruiter, Michigan Coach Rick Bay
has also held his own the past two seasons in the recruit-
ing battle since taking over for the retired Cliff Keen. Bay
has gotten some pretty good talent to attend Michigan but
his problem seems to be keeping them on the team.
Bay lost three of last year's best wrestlers this season.
Rob Huizenga, Walt Sexton, and Rick Bolhouse all left the

team which, at the least, indicates that Bay has not done a
good Job of motivating the team. While his knowledge of the
sport is unquestionable, the loss of the three promising grap-
plers shows a lack of either communication or respect between
Bay and the team.'
Contrast this to Peninger's situation at State where he
has all ten starters back from last year's championship team.
Peninger's statement that "Keeping them is harder
than winning them," seems to apply both to the athletes he
guides and to the Big Ten championship he continues to
hold..
So, if the other also-ran coaches don't at least try to adopt
some of .Peninger's forward thinking philosophy in coaching
and relating to the athletes it looks like Michigan State will
continue to dominate Big Ten 'wrestling while the others look
in from the outside.-

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING - Combining
a balanced scoring attack and a
sparkling fast break, Michigan's
undefeated freshmen dealt herald-
ed Lindsay Hairston and the rest
of his Spartan crew a convincing
102-92 drubbing.
While the victory margin was
only ten points at the final buzz-
er, the Wolverines were in con-
trol most of the game and ran up
a twenty point spread with about
nine minutes left in the contest.
The win was the twelfth is an
many games for Michigan, and
Wolverine coach Divk Honig was
ecstatic about the outscome. He
offered in a somewhat hoarse
voice, "That was a great ball-
game. I just can't say enough; it
was completely a team effort."
Indeed it was a team effort as
all five starters ended up scoring
in double figures, and Campy Rus-
sell led the Wolverines with 30.
The contest didn't give a clear
cut answer to who was the best
SCORE S
Kentucky State 121, Eastern Michigan
76.
South Carolina 109, Notre Dame 83
Oral Roberts 100, Harvard 99
Marquette 63, Xavier, Ohio 55
Western Kentucky 83, Austin Peay 74
Jacksonville 110, Houston 108, ot
SW Louisiana 90, NW Louisiana 73
Alabama 73, Kentucky 70

daily
sports,
NIGHT EDITOR:
FRANK LONGO
player - Russell or Hairston. The
game, billed as the match-up be-
tween the former Pontiac Cen-
tral star and Hairston, the for-
mer Detroit Kettering whiz, end-
ed with the two playing to a
stand-off.
Hairston was devastating under
the basket with his quick moves
and turn around jumpers from
the baseline; he finished up with
32 points and 13 rebounds. Rus-
sell hadtrouble hitting from the
outside at the start, but finally
began to find the range.
Joe Johnson, Hairston's high
school teammate at Kettering,
sparked the Wolverines to sever-
al easy fast break buckets, and
that proved to be the difference
in the contest.
Both teams began the game in
a hot running style. Michigan
State opened up a brief lead, but
a jumper by C.J. Kupec put Mich-
igan out in front 5-4, and the
Wolverines kept that lead the rest
of the way.
A couple of goaltending calls

and two missed calls on State
aroused the mixed crowd of 8,206
early. Hairston and Lovelle Riv-
ers apparently were trying to in-
timidate Michigan inside with the
blocks, and they managed to get
away with two blocks that seemed
to be obvious goaltending viola-
tions.
Michigan increased its lead to
eight with four minutes left in
the first half, 37-29, as Johnson
scored an easy lay-up on a fast
break and then stole the ball and
drove in for another two points.
The Wolverines came away at in-
termission leading 52-41.
STATe HEADed
MICHIGAN

Midway through the second
half the Wolverines broke loose
for a 9-2 tear to up their lead
to 85-65. But the Spartans came
back with ten unanswered points
to pull within ten with 5:17 left.
State couldn't get any closer,
though, and the Wolverines hit
the 100 point mark for the sev-
enth straight time.
The contest was marred with
several defensive lapses, and nei-
ther squad played tight defense.
Both Michigan and the Spartans
tried pressing, but without little
success. The few times that State
employed the press Michigan was
able to break it for easy two-on-
one breaks.
Despite the over-all loose de-
fense, Michigan's Doug Ashworth
turned in a fine day on boards,
and also forced Spartan forward
Joe Shackleton to go to the bench
early in the second half with four
fouls. Ashworth was credited with
only four caroms, but easily had
twice that many.

Russell
Ashworth
Kupec
Kantner
Johnson
Ayler
Wolff
Rahn
McParlan
TOTALS

fg
11-23
4-12
6-8
7-11
9-16
3-5
0-0
0-0
0-0
40-75

ft
8-13
5-5
2-2
0-1
7-11
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
22-32

r
8
4
10
4
3
3
0
0
0'
32

MICHIGAN STATE

p I
2
3
4
0
3
2
0
0
0
4
P1
4
4
2
5
2
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
22

pts
30
13
14
14
25
6
0
0
0
102
pts
6
15
32
6
16
13
2
0
0
0
2
0
92

-Daily-Mort Novepk
WOLVERINE FROSH STAR Campy Russell (40) goes up for onw
of his 30 points in yesterday's 102-92 conquest of the Baby Gree
in East Lansing. Leaping in a futile attempt to block 'the bucket
is Lindsay Hairston (45). The rest of the Spartans were equally
unable to stop Michigan's 12th win.

Shackleton
Rivers
Hairston
Borenstein
Glover
Davis
Scholten
Martin
Morehead
Hubbard
Mort
Schilling
TOTALS

fg
3-9
6-15
15-27
3-5
6-17
5-14
1-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-1
0-0
40-92

ft
0-0
3-5
2-4
0-0
4-5
3-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
12-18

r
13
13
1
2
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
43

This Week in Sports
TONIGHT
BASKETBALL-at Indiana
THURSDAY
SWIMMING-Big Ten Championships at Michigan State
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
TRACK-Big Ten Meet at Ohio State
SWIMMING-Big Ten Championships at Michigan State
GYMNASTICS-Big Ten Championships at Illinois
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-at Michigan State
HOCKEY-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
TRACK-Big Ten Meet at Ohio State
SWIMMING-Big Ten Championships at Michigan State
GYMNASTICS-Big Ten Championships at Illinois

SCORE BY PERIODS

Michigan State
MICHIGAN

41 51-92
52 50--102

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