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April 07, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-07

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Page 2-Saturday, April 7, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Former prof. addresses racism

By TOM MIRGA
Archie Singham, former University
political scientist and current United
Nations research scholar, told an
audience of more than 100 at Schorling
Auditorium last evening that a univer-
sity obtaining an education out of the
blood of innocent South African
children had better stop to think.
Singham's speech was sponsored by a

coalition of local groups to com-
memorate the tenth anniversary of the
Black Action Movement (BAM) strike
of 1969, which attempted to force the
University administration to achieve a
goal of 10 per cent minority admissions,
a goal that has never been fully
achieved.
SINGHAM SAID the concerns of
minority groups today are very similar

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Needsa ride
out of ton?
Check the IE itlg
classifieds under
transportation

to the concerns of those same groups in
1969. He claimed that the University is
currently divided into two camps -
those who are consumed by the pursuit
of knowledge and those who would put
that knowledge to practice at the ex-
pense of risking their tenure.
"The University has become the
haven for Neanderthals, a place where
individuals who practiced the pursuit of
knowledge have been chased out,"
Singham said.
The former Uniyersity professor said
the BAM strike "was not a numbers
game, but a challenge to those in-
dividuals who preached knowledge to
put their ideas to practice."
SINGHAM SAID he did not intend
practice to mean a search for new
strikes, but "a call for the utilization of
knowledge to improve the daily'lives of
those individuals who are immediately
around us."
Those people who were opposed to the
BAM strike had claimed that
knowledge was the property of the
owners of the University, ,Singham

Church Worsbip Services

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120S. State St.
(Crner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Commutnion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
'Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and ii a.m.
+Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
pr. Donald B. Strobe
-ev. Fred B. Maitland
br. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
ntern: Carol Bennington
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
P CKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Pickard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
;Worship-11:00 a.m.
;For transportation-call 662-6253
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
60(E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rl'. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Lyiette Bracy. Mike Pennanen.
Shkl-ey Polakowski
aunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
in Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6:15-Worship Fellowship.
U IVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC'MS
R ert Kavasch, Interim Pastor
15tt Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
rouble Sunday Services-9=.15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
I2idweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:10 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study-Thursday at
7:36 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
51ZE. Huron St.-663-9376
Jltuo Morikawa, Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Making Your
Entrance"-Mr. Kachel.
5:30 p.m.-Dinner-Lenten Service-
American Baptist Fellowship presenta-
lion of Leroy Waterman's play. "Song
of Songs.
Join The.,
Daily

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
11:00a.m.-Worship Service.
6 p.m.-Dinner.
7 p.m.-Program on the World Peace
Tax Fund.
'Monday, April 9:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at the Wesley Foundation
(corner of State & Huron). To examine
our lifestyles in light of the world
hunger/ecology/justice situation.
Tuesday, April lo:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at Lord of Light.
Wednesday. April 11:
7:00 p.m.-Choir practice: new choir
members are always welcome!
8:30 p.m.-Bible Study: a study of the
history and theology of the Old
Testament: led by Gary Herion, a
doctoral student in Old Testament
studies.
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sqith State St.
Rev.Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EyENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors *rograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.--Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, April 8-Topic
title: "How People Cope With Their
Prejudices"- Yvonne Lockwood.
Quote of the Week:
"He flattereth himself on being a.
man without any prejudices, and this
pretension itself is a very great pre-
judice."-Anatole France.
* * *
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY
C(IURCII
1769 Broadway
Rev. Ted Richmond
3 p.m.-Worship with presentation by
Representative Perry Bullard.
For Gays.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High).
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *,
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00{a.m.-Palm Sunday Service.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
* * * a
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
TH E NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
FULL GOSPEL HOLY GHOST
BELIEVING MINISTRY
at THE SALVATION ARMY CHAPEL
9S. Park Street
Ypsilanti, Michigan
482-4700
Sunday Worship-1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday Worship-7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Acts 2:39,1 Cor. 12.
Note: We will only be at the Salva-
tion Army Chapel until April 18, New
location unknown as of yet.

said, and the freedom of education,
"like motherhood, is an ideal that you
don't play around with, especially when
it is linked to property."
Singham went on to say there were
four basic demands made by the
proponents of a new world economic
order; the right to political and
economic self determination, a call for
the end of racism, an end to the
economic exploitation of the third world
by former colonial powers, and an end
to the present world order that commits
genocide by making it impossible for
the children of the world to escape the
spectre of starvation.
Developer-s
to appeal
Kimberly
en
Hills case
By ELEONORA DI LISCIA
Despite Judge Benjamin Stanczyk's
decision last Wednesday to put aside
five acres of Ann Arbor's Kimberly
Hills woods for a nature preserve, a
battle over the 18-acre tract of land has
not ended. The owners and developers
of the land, Harry and Patricia Dion,
have decided to appeal the judge's
ruling.
The case began when the Dions made
plans to develop the 18-acre plot into 80
residential homes. In protest, neigh-
borhood residents brought suit under
the Michigan Environmental Protec-
tion Act. For the first time, the act was
applied to a tract of land inside a city
and the judge put aside the fiv acres.
IN AN ATTEMPT to resolve the con-
flict, city officials offered the Dions
$66,000 for the five acres plus two and
one-half more, but the developers tur-
ned down the offer.
"We feel so strongly about individual
property rights that we didn't want to
talk about the park land because we
want to see what the courts will do,"
Patricia Dion said.
According to area resident Lex
Grapentine, neighborhood represen-
taties met with Mayor Louis Belcher
and members of his staff to discuss a
proposal to acquire the land.
"PARTLY OUR feelings were that,
while five acres was delightful, more
than five acres would make an even
better preserve," Grapentine said.
"The second reason was that the Dions
are, in fact, being financially screwed
and any plan that we could come up
with that would allow some financial
recompense would be in order."
Grapentine also pointed out that the
city, as well as the neighborhood would
benefit by creating another city park.
And with $54,000 availble from city cof-
fers, the two groups decided to pur-
chase the land.
But since the Dions are not interested
in the offer and are now determined to
appeal Judge Stanczyk's decision,
there is little the city can do but fight
for the land in court.
"We'll take it to the federal Supreme
Court if we have to," Grapentine said.
"There was little doubt even before the
judge's decision that one of the two
sides would appeal.."
Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1979
Daily Calendar:
WUOM: Ralph Perlaez interviews Norman
Jaspan, "White Collar Crime", 1 p.m.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
3J20 SAB 763-4117
Michigan Economics for Human Development
(formerly United Migrants for Opportunity).
Openings for student coordinators in many locations
throughout midwestern Michigan. Further details
available.
Bristol Regional Environmental Center, Bristol,
Conn. Summer internship with background in
Natural Sciences. Further details available.
Deadline May 15.
Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus,
Ohio. Number of openings for students in the
following fields-chemical engr., must have com-
pleted a B.S. and going on to grad school. Mech. and
petroleum engr., students who have completed their
junior year.
Ralston Purina Company, St. Louis, Mi. Three
summer intern openings. Computer Science
Major/Math Major. Must have completed
Sophomore year. Further details available.
Hitchiner Manufacturing Co., Milford, N.H.
Opening for strategic planning assistant. Will be in-
volved in the data collection, analysis and final draf-
ting of plans. Further details available. Excellent
salary plus bonus.
Rain Pro Irrigation, Pontiac, Mi. Openings for
general labor, outdoor work. Also, opening for a
foreman. Good salary. Further details available. In-
stall sprinkler systems.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 149
Friday, April 6, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesda through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
A University student braves strong winds that whipped through town Thursday
night and yesterday. The gusty winds plagued most of the Midwest, causing
electrical blackouts and heavy property damage.
Nuclea-r equipm.-ent
sabotged in F rakce

A.

LA SEYNE-SUR-MER, France (AP)
- Skillful saboteurs slipped into an in-
dustrial plant- and blew up nuclear
equipment bound for Iraq and two other
countries early yesterday. An
anonymous caller later said the bom-
bers wanted to protect the human race
from - future "Harrisburg
catastrophes."
The sabotage team, using three
plastic explosive charges, damaged
components for two experimental
reactors destined for Iraq. Belgian-
ordered equipment for loading nuclear
fuel into a reactor, and a West German-
ordered lid for a container to store
radioactive materials at a nuclear
plant, informed sources reported.
DAMAGE WAS estimated in the
millions of dollars. Three watchmen in
the hangar-like assembly plant at the
time of the 3 a.m. blasts escaped injury.
French officials said there was no
radioactive material in the plant -
owned by the nuclear division of the

private Mediterranean Naval and In-
dustrial Construction firm - and no
danger to this town on France's
Mediterranean coast near Toulon.
The motive for the bombing was un-
clear. It came amid increasingly vocal'
protest of the French government's
decision not to slow down its nuclear
energy program in the wake of the ac-
cident at the Three Mile Island nuclear
plant outside Harrisburg.
But the French-Iraqi nuclear deal ,in
itself has been the center of inter-
national controversy.
THE DEAL reportedly would send
weapons-grade enriched uranium to the
hardline, anti-Israeli regime in Bagh-
dad and is known to have caused
anxiety in Washington and in
Jerusalem.
A telephone caller told the Paris
newspaper Le Monde a previously
unknown "Group of French Ecologists"
was responsible for the bombing and
that it had "neutralized machines
dangerous to human life."

S. African urban guerrilla
executed despite protests

PRETORIA (Reuter)-South Africa
executed black urban guerrilla
Solomon Mahlangu at dawn yesterday
despite a flood of protest and appeals
for clemency from world leaders.
Black inmates accused of trying to
overthrow the government sang songs
of revenge in their cells after hearing
that Mahlangu was hanged on the
gallows of Pretoria Central Jail.
THE 23-YEAR-OLD member of the
banned African National Congress
(ANC) was sentenced, to death for his
part in the killing of two white men
during a 1977 gunbattle with police.
He was secretly buried after a
funeral service attended by close

relatives at the jail. The authorities
refused to disclose the location of the
grave.
One prisoner, Zephania Mothopeng, a
founding member of the outlawed Pan-
African Congress, told a court that on
learning of Mahlangu's death he joined
other prisoners in a song.

f

"THEY KILLED Mahlangu. The ;
Boers (South Africans of Dutch
descent) are dogs and they will die like
dogs," they sang.
Mr. Mothopeng, 65, is one. of 18 men:
who have ben on trial at Bethal, 125
miles southwest of Pretoria, for 16 mon-
ths.

Study says minor leaguers
need recreation to win

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

One day, Abraham, Friend of God, was sitting in his tent
door in "the heat of the day." They tell us.it gets mighty hot in
that land, 120 degrees or more. However, not far from where
he was sitting, and not so long afterwards, probably 15 or 16
hours, thentemperature suddenly jumped up maybe ten,,.
housand degrees, or a million, as it began raining fire and
-rimstone from heaven! understand it gets so hot where a
nuclear blast occurs the rocks and sand melt, run together
and cake up! It appears, though, that the fire that fell from
heaven told about in 1st Kings 18-38 was even hotter, for it
not only melted but consumed stones and dust!
Note the powerful effect of the prayer and pleading of
God's Friend, Abraham, who a few hours before "Stood
before the Lord": The Angel told Lot to get his folks and get
out of the city. As Lot fooled around killing time the Angel
said, hurry it up, and getout of here: "I cannot do anything till
thou come thither"-into another city! Abraham's prayer
made the Angel powerless until Lot got out "1 CANNOT DO
ANYTHING ... I" First, he must be "an Angel of
deliverance" before he could be "an Angel of destruction!"
4z %a.a16-99I'

called "The Friend of God."
In Luke 17:28-30 we read these words of Christ:
"LIKEWISE ALSO AS IT WAS IN THE DAYS OF LOT: THEY
DID EAT, THEY DRANK, THEY BOUGHT, THEY SOLD,
THEY PLANTED, THEY BUILDED: BUT THE SAME DAY
THAT LOT WENT OUT OF SODOM IT RAINED FIRE AND
BRIMSTONE FROM HEAVEN, AND DESTROYED THEM
ALL. EVEN THUS SHALL IT BE IN THE DAY THE SON OF
MAN IS REVEALED!"
We are sure like Sodom in our eating, drinking, buying,
selling, planting, and building. But there were other things
Sodom was doing for which she has been noted and in-
famous down through the about 4,000 years since that
horrible and hot "rainy day"! She has been noted for her sex
crimes, deviates, perverts, etc. One great crime takes it name
from Sodom. This 19th Chapter of Genesis reveals that the
homosexuals actually undertook to attack the Angels of God
and they had to use their supernatural power to keep them
off, striking them with blindness-their descendants of our
day are grossly blind to righteousness, purity and decency!
Sex perversions, rampant all around in our day, excused by

By BETH ROSENBERG
The relationship between work and
non-work activities affects job perfor-
mance, according to a study of a minor
league baseball team by two University
researchers.
During a 128-game regulation season,
Mitch Marks, a second year graduate
student in observational psychology,
and Phillip Mirvis, a 1978 University
graduate who currently teaches at
Boston University, studied a Class A,
Illinois-based baseball team.
"SOMETIMES T HE team bus
arrived at the field five minutes before
game time and the players didn't get
batting practice or a good night's
sleep," Marks remarked. "Environ-
mental conditions definitely affect per-
formance."
One variable important to job per-.
formance, Marks said, was location of
the hotel-whether or not it was near a

after work, and something to do bet-
ween games.
"Players fresh out of high school had
the biggest adjustment because they
were used to baseball as a recreational
activity. Suddenly it's their job and cen-
tral purposein life," Marks explained.
Runs scored during games were used
as a performance measure. Marks said
he was against the run factor because
he was 'not convinced that an 8-5 game
is better played than a 1-0 game."
ANOTHER FACTOR lending creden-
ce to the environmental influences
theory is the team's won-loss record.
The quality of the opposing team had
less influence on the game's outcome
than the environmental affect.
A comparable study of a major
league team, Marks said, would have
different variables because of first
class travel and room accom-
modations, higher salaries, different
incentives, and glamourous cities.
"To do the study, we'd have to ap-

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