100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 07, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

;,

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, April 7, 1979-Page 3
UGLI RESPONDS TO SUGGESTIONS:
Smok ing poi planned

;FMUSEE N PNLV OWVUL ..MNY
Better late
On the front page of yesterday's Daily was a bulletin reporting that
several areas of the city were without power Thursday night because a
wind storm had knocked down some lines. You couldn't have read
about it yesterday morning, however, since our printing press was
without the juice due to the outage. It was a long 12 hour delay, but the
paper was finally born late yesterday afternoon, just in time to scoop
the six o'clock news. We apologize for the inconvenience.
Cheers and chills
Patrons consuming spirits last Saturday night at Dooley's got a
thrill a la Three Mile Island. At midnight, Dooley's workers turned
down the blaring music and told the crowd the Ann Arbor Police has
asked them to evacuate the premises because of a nuclear explosion in
nearby Monroe, Michigan. Many customers reportedly fell for the an-
nouncement until a friendly "Happy April Fool's Day from Dooley's"
ended the suspense.
Outreach
A report by the Psychology Department which was to outline major
changes in Project Outreach, has been postponed, according to
Outreach Director Shula Reinharz, so that final revisions can be
discussed more thoroughly. The report was to be given to the Literary
College Executive Committee for final approval, and will probably be
ready by the end of next week.
Correction
In an article yesterday on the MSA elections, we quoted a Tom
Sullivan. Our source was in fact Jim Sullivan. Sorry, Jim.
What's in a name?
For Ann Arborites who've waited for years for signs of possible
corruption between the town's Democrats and Republicans, there
could be hope. After smoothly introducing several citizens who had
reserved public speaking time before City Council Thursday night,
Mayor Louis Belcher stumbled repeatedly over the pronounciation of
one citizen's last name, before finally giving up. The mystery man
stepped in front of Council and carefully spelled out and pronounced
his last name: "A-d-a-m-o, and I'm-the chairman of the Ann Arbor
Democratic party." The Republican mayor replied laughing, "I'r
sorry, that's why I didn't know your name." "That's quite understan-.
dable," Adamo responded. Never have Humphrey Bogart's words
been more appropriate: "Louie, this could be the beginning of a
beautiful friendship."
Search goes on
With fewer than fifty names left on the list of possible successors to
Robben Fleming, the search for a permanent University president
continues. On Wednesday- night Regents Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham), Thomas Roach (D-Grosse Pointe), Deane Baker (R-
Ann Arbor), and Gerald Dunn (D-Lansing) met with members of the
student and faculty advisory committees in two separate meetings.
Members of the student committee described their meetings as a
general information session, during which the groups discussed how
the students were reducing the list of nominees and how they could
make decisions based upon information limited to published material
and resumes. Faculty hear Harold Johnson declined comment on the
purpose of his group's meeting with the Regents.
Take ten
Democrat Robert Harris and four Democratic City Council candid-
tes won an upset victory in Ann Arbor's city elections on April 7, 1969.
The election brought city government under Democratic control for
the first time in 30 years. That same day, the Literary College faculty
extended the pass-fail option to language courses and ruled that four
years of high school language is enough to exempt students from
taking such courses.
Happenings
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Paths of ;lory, 7, 10'20 p.m., The Killing,
8:40 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Mediatrics-Steppenwolf, 7,8:45, 10:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema II-Outrageous, 7, 9p.m.; Angell Aud. A.
Cinema Guild-Slave of.Love, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch Aud.
Pound House-Children's films, Anansi the Spider, 1, 2:30 p.m., 1024
Hill.
PERFORMANCES
Rhyme Space-Poetry readings by Martha Merrill, Kees Snoek,
Debra Dudley, Richard Hitt, 2-4 p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
UAC/Musket-Bernstein's On the Town, 2,8p.m., Power Center.
Music School-Euphonium Recital, 8 p.m., Stearns Bldg.
Residential College Players-Between Women: Faces of Frien-

dship, 8 p.m., Res. College Aud. E., East Quad.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society-HMS Pinafore, 8 p.m., Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Men's Glee Club-120th Anniversary Concert, 8p.m., Hill Aud.
SPEAKERS
Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living-Toni Haney, vocational
counselor, "Disability and Employment," 1-4 p.m., Washtenaw Coun-
ty Comm. College, 4800 E. Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor.
Hispanic-American Lecture Series- Tlomas _Rivera, Univ. of
Texas, "Strategies of Hispanics in Higher Education," 2 p.m.,
Rackham Amph.
MISCELLANEOUS
Recycle Ann Arbor, Inc.-Pickup of recyclable materials in area
bounded by Main-St., Liberty St., Stadium Blvd. on Ann Arbor's west
side, 9 a.m.
Air Force ROTC-Basketball tournament for charity, 9 a.m., Huron
High School.
School of Nat. Resources-Symposium on "Fisheries and Native
American Rights: The Michigan and Northwest Experiences," 9
a.m.-5 p.m., Dining Hall 4, South Quad.
East Quad-Symposium on Women's Issues: For Everyone,"
workshops, speakers, films, entertainment, 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m., East
Quad.
Washtenaw County Comm. College- "As the Child Grows," a
Saturday fair for parents and child care staffs, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.,
Washtenaw County Comm. College Student Activities Bldg.
Alice Lloyd/Pilot Program-Art Therapy Workshop, silkscreen, in-
structor: Susan Gail Baker, 1-4 p.m., Klein Lounge, Alice Lloyd.
Minority Student Services/Native American Students Assoc.-A2
Indian Pow-wow, 2-5 p.m., 8-11 p.m., Cleary College Auditorium.
U-M Folklore Society-Square and Contra Dance, 8:30 p.m., Hillel

BY WILLIAM THOMPSON
In order to clear the air in the con-
tinuing debate over Undergraduate
Library (UGLI) smoking policy, the
library staff will conduct a student poll
on the issue April 9 through 27.
Since the UGLI instituted tighter
restrictions on smoking last fall, both
camps in the smoking controversy have
lodged complaints in the UGLI
suggestion box.
"SOME WANT TO ban smoking
everywhere and some want it
(smoking) allowed everywhere," said
Barbara Hoppe, secretary of the UGLI,

about the complaints.
Hoppe is part of a five-member
UGLI staff committee which is respon-
sible for devising a new smoking policy.
Hoppe said the group will draw con-
clusions from the student poll during
the summer and that a new policy will
be ready to go into force at the begin-
ning of the fall term.
The committee devised a question-
naire for students to complete which
lists several alternative smoking
policies ranging from the current rules
permitting smoking only in smoking
rooms, to permitting smoking in half

the basement, or all of one or two floors.
RESPONDENTS CAN also vote on
whether to permit smoking in the coffee
lounge, although the sight and sound
center will remain non-smoking.
Questionnaires will be available at
the UGLI eference desk on Monday.
"There's . an assortment of com-
binations that could conceivably
work," said Hoppe. "We did not put
down all smoking or all non-smoking"
because it was not a realistic choice.
THE CURRENT policy, instituted.
last fall, came in response to student
demands for an increase in non-
smoking areas. Previously smoking
had been prohibited only on the second
floor whichled to "a ton of complaints
in the suggestion box," according to
Hoppe.
No matter what new policy is chosen,
enforcement of the rules will remain a
problem for the UGLI staff. "The staff
doesn't want to enforce it," claimed
Hoppe. "That's not anybody's job
here." She pointed out that the UGLI
does not have security guards like the
Graduate Library.

MANN THEAT
MAPLE VMUM SNOPPING ENE
769.1 300
ADMISSION
Adult $4.00 No Passes on Weekends
Child 52.50
YOU'LL BELIEVE
A MAN CAN FLY
SUPERMAN
RLON BRANDO
. ..NE HACKMAN
ELEsID SY a wKU U OS~ ~
t1

ii'

Mon-FRI
1:30
4:15

SHOWTIMES
7:00
SAT. & SUN.

9:45
7:00
9:45

9:45

'U, prof.

0

U.S. should

use new work model

SHOWTIMES
MON.-FRI 8:00

By BETH ROSENBERG
Adapting the Japanese idea of per-
manent employment in single jobs
would reduce worker turnover and en-
courage long-term goals, in the U.S.,
according to a University sociologist.
Comparing job mobility patterns in
Yokohama and Detroit auto plants,
Prof. Robert Cole, associate chairman
of the Sociology Department, said
workers who continuously acquire new
skills and roles have less motivation to
change jobs frequently.
CAREER ENLARGEMENT involves
the use of company resources to train,
educate, and upgrade the position of
blue collar and lower white'collar em-
ployees, and to retain them for most of
their work years," Cole said.
In theory, Cole said, equal emphasis
is placed on the development of worker
potential and productivity. In practice,
he explained, the emphasis is on
productivity.
The lower a person's occupational
status, Cole said, the more he or she
fears a lay-off. Employers in Japan
received partial government grants to
cover partial wage payments to tem-
porarily unemployed workers.
"IN THE UNITED States, only
unionized employees have property
rights in their jobs. And even unionized

workers have little protection from
economically-based dismissals," he
said.
Cole said he isouncertain about the
impact of his study, but he knows there
is a strong interest in theJapanese em-
ployment industry by Americans.
"I think the Japanese draw on basic
motivational principles which are
relevant in any society," said Cole, who
spent the last year in Japan on a
Fulbright grant.
"THE JAPANESE learned a lot from
American social scientists, and they ac-
ted faster than we did," said Cole.
Cole has been studying Japanese
workers for the last ten years, and has
spent four and a half years in that coun-
try. To research his 1971 study on
Japanese blue collar workers, Cole
worked on an assembly line at an auto
factory and a dye plant.
The sociologist recommends policy
developments with incentives for em-
ployers to retain and train their current
employees. During slow periods,
unemployment insurance subsidies
would go straight to the firm instead of
the worker.
Japanese workers aren't any happier
than American workers, Cole said,
because "Japanese workers have
higher expectations than Americans so
they are often frustrated."

1:00

SAT. & SUN

.
17,;'s*

8:00 1

4:30

Medlatrics presents
STE PPEN.WOLF
(Fred Haines) Max Von Sydow stars in the title role as a
loner who is torn between bourgeois respectibility and his
wolfish impulses. Based on the novel by Herman Hesse.

Sat, April 7

Nat Sci Aud
Admission $1.50

7:00. 0:45, 10:30

:,

Richard Benne~r 1977
OUTRAGEOUS*
Outrageous tells the story of Robin (CRAIG RUSSELL), a Gay transvetite
hairdresser in Toronto and his diagnosed-schizophrenic woman friend. When
she escapes from a mental hospital and moves in with Robin,-he cares for
her far more successfully than the institution ever could. However, Robin
is fired from his job when he starts doing drag at vwork and so moves
onward and upward to make it big in NYC as a female impersonator. The
girl does wonderous things with Streisand, Garland, Davis, Mae West, Carol
Channing, Pearl, Ella, Tallulah, with a most stirring, "better-than-the-orig-
inal" Peggy Lee. Based on a story from the "Butterfly Ward" by Margaret
Gibson, OUTRAGEOUS has shown to sell-out houses across Canada, in
London, New York, and Ann Arbor. "Uplifting."-D.W. (100 min.)

Six honored with Guggenheims

Six University professors have
received Guggenheim Fellowship
Awards in the John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation's 55th annual
competition.
Prof. John Kingdon, political science,
Prof. Ladislav Matejka, Slavic
languages and literatures, Prof. Joel
Smoller, mathematics, Prof. Donald

Tinkle, zoology, Prof. Hal Varian,
economics, and Prof. Gary Wither-
spoon, anthropology each received
fellowships enabling them to conduct a
year's continuous work in their respec-
tive fields.
The fellowships are awarded on the
basis of demonstrated accomplishmen-
ts and strong promise.

a,

SUN-Milos Forman's FIREMAN'S BALL
WED-Marcel Camus' BLACK ORPHEUS

TONITE at
7&9

Angell Hall, Aud. 'A'
$1.50

(I

'I

r

NIKITA MIKHALKOV'S (Ann Arbor Premiere) 1976
SLAVE OF LOVE
This highly-acclaimed and most popular film to come out of the Soviet Union
in memory makes its debut. One of the three films-within-films on our
schedule (see HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR & DAY FOR NIGHT). Is it . any
coincidence that all of them are love stories? SLAVE OF LOVE is set in the
Russian countryside, for from the revolution that is simultaneously taking
place in the cities. Stunning color photography. In Russian with subtitles.
Sun: Polanski's REPULSION

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

The Ann Arbor film Coprif ve presents at MLB 3
Saturday, April 7
PATHS OF GLORY
(Stanley Kubrick, 1957) 7 & 10:20-MLB 3
Kubrick's anti-war film is still one of the most cool-headed assaults in cold-
blooded murder; a riveting, stunning meditation on cowardice and justice.
Full of bril ant dialogue and action sequences. Stars ADOLPHE MENJOU,
KIRK DOUGLAS, RALPH MEEKER, and un unnerving TIMOTHY CAREY as
Private Ferol.
THE KILLING
(Stanley Kubrick, 1956) 8:40 only-MLB 3
"Kubrick's first Hollywood film-tailor-made for an Oscar. In my part as
Nicky, a bigoted killer hired to shoot a race horse, I had to fire a double-
barreled shotgun and drive a small MG sportscar out of which I had to jump
18 times before they got the right shot. The role was diabolical in that I had
to con a black guard at the parking lot in order to get near the horse ..."
-Timothy Carey. With STERLING HAYDEN and ELISHA COOK, JR.
Monday: THE MASK OF DIMITRIOS & THE UNDERCOVER MAN
o o4 e*14d i. A we. cj. 1.0
Aryoi' Goren'i, Hebrew We~v.:
". h e W or l4 off-Sorft J O ur
q lt1 C f*)nth, M rn
1-hb rIQce: 4111el1 FOUI'ATOA1
14t WIt St

(.i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan