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March 31, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-31

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"JiNJ NOR C

Page 2-Saturday, March 31, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Church Worship Services

Atomic mishap worsens

La

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
P.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
FULL GOSPEL HOLY GHOST
BELIEVING MINISTRY
at THE SALVATION ARMY CHAPEL
9 S. Park Street
Ypsilanti, Michigan
482-4700
Sunday Worship-1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday Worship-7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Acts 2:39,1Cor.12.
Note: We will only be at the Salva-
tion Army Chapel until April 18, New
location unknown as of yet.
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomnaker, Chaplain
Lynette Bracy, Mike Pennanen,
Shirley Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6:15-Worst ip Fellowship.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LOTS
Robert Kavasch, Interim Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9=15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00p.m.
Midweek Bible Study-Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Submission to
Suffering -Mr. Morikawa.
11 a.m.-College Bible Study-"Wo-
men in theBible."
5:30 p.m.BDinner-Lenten Service
-Panel Discussion on "Christian as
Sabbath Symbol" by guest speaker The
Rev. Norman DePug, Pastor First Bap-
tist Church, Dearborn.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
11:00a.m.-Worship Service.
6 p.m.-Dinner.
7 p.m.-Program on the World Peace
Tax Fund.
Monday, April 2:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at the Wesley Foundation
(corner of State & Huron). To examine
our lifestyles in light of the world
hunger/ecology/justice situation.
Tuesday, April 3:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at Lord of Light.
Wednesday, April 4:
7:00 p.m.-Choir practice; new choir
members are always welcome!
8:30 p.m.-Bible Study; a study of the
history and theology of the Old
Testament; led by Gary Herion, a
doctoral student in Old Testament
studies.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sqth State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
%JNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
spionsors.-programs in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, April 1-
Topic title: "Has Religion Beenra Sig-
nificant Factor in My Life?"-Turner
Clinics Creative Writing (Proup (Ruth
Campbell, founder and social worker,
in charge).'
Quote of the Week:
"Religion without joy-it is no re-
ligion"-Theodore Parker.
* * *
'METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY
"CHURCH
1769 Broadway
Rev. Ted Richmond
3 p.m.-Worship with presentation by
Representative Perry Bullard.
'n'or Gays.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorce& Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
. * * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday-School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
April Fool's Day
10:00 a.m.-"Christianity as Comic"
(service of Holy Communion).
5:30 p.m.-Film: "The Mark of the
Clown" (Floyd Shaffer's film on clown-
ing as worship).
6:00 p.m.-Evening service including
Shaffer's film "A Clown Is Born."
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-1i :00 a.m. -
For transportation-call 662-6253

(Continued from Page 1)
tee, said the accident could lead to long delays in nuclear
plant construction. He said the United States could face
serious power shortages this summer if the Harrisburg plan-
ts and others in the east are closed.
"THE INCIDENT puts nuclear power in semi-limbo until
all the information is in," the Washington state Democrat
told reporters. "It certainly does hurt the nuclear power
program."
After a briefing by NRC officials, Pennsylvania Sen.
Richard Schweiker said: "Nobody knows whether the chance
Is one in a thousand or one in a million or one in 10. . . But
they (NRC officials) now admit for the first time that a melt-
down is possible."
Government and plant officials issued conflicting reports
on whether the new leak was expected, but they agreed that
the amount of radiation was a surprise.
"I DID NOT expect the radiation levels to be that high,"
said E.C. McCabe, an NRC section chief who was at the plant
site on the Susquehanna River.
Men, women and children began fleeing Harrisburg, but
there was no stampede. State police reported traffic was
Group sues
University in
Hash, Bash i
controvers By BRIAN
and DIAN]
(Continued from Page 1)
E dward Wil
grounds that it violated the First biologist who h
Amendment.bilgswhN
"To issue someone a permit to ap- voluble advocat
pear on the Diag and then to revoke it human behavior
is, under these conditions (where a applied his hun
religious group is involved), a violation question of ethic
of the First Amendment," said Kurt ching the wee]
Thornbladh, the lawyer for Sweetfire tures program.
Ministries in the case. The sociobio
The defendants in the case include: plex developm
J.P. Weidenbach, an administrative of- culture; and ev(
ficer of the University, Roy More, a - consider to b
Vice President of MSA, and Walter nature" are det
Stevens, Director of University "biogram,"
Security. program-the
"IT'S SORT OF a grey area as to who maximize one'
has final jurisdictional say over the larger human g
Diag," said More last night. "That's
why I think all three groups (ad- COMPARED
ministration, MSA, security), were behavioral ar
named in the suit." More explained that view falls som
it isn't MSA's normal procedure to pull controversial
a request for a permit, but it occurred flyer entitled
after he received a memo from security Political?" w
to cancel groups scheduled for April 1 perhaps 1,200
on the Diag. streamed into
"They (the University) don't want to Hall. It critic
sanction anything that has to do with thinly-veileds
the Hash Bash, so they don't want to Darwinism.
sanction it (the band)," said John Wilson, wh
Boshoven, the organizer of Sweetfire etomologist, ch
Ministries. Boshoven said he was con- audience at firs
cerned about masses of high school
students smoking hash on the Didg

"light, not even moderate."
The scene in the parking lot of the Bainbridge Elementary
School, four miles south of the plant, was hectic as parents
drove up and hurriedly-pulled their children out.
"I'M SCARED FOR the children," said Pat Matier, who
was near tears, after she drove up and collected her seven-
year-old twins, Kimberly and Kirk.
"We are getting out of here," said Michael Paris, 12, who
with a classmate lowered the American flag outside the red-
brick, one-story schoolhouse.
BUT IN OTHER areas of town, many residents expressed
little concern over the threat of nuclear contamination.
"Everyone seems to be happy and doing their own thing,"
stated Ed Lysoght, who works at the Maurice Acri restaurant
in Harrisburg. "They've been telling jokes, we had a few
guys a minute ago arguing about the difference between
Tennessee beer and Tennessee ale."
A bartender at the English Tavern, said the situation is
out of the public's hands.
"Whatever's gonna happen's gonna happen. We have no
control over what happens to us." With a sigh, he added,
"I'm not concerned."
tobiologist Says
all in the genes

BLANCHARD
E HAITHMAN
son, the Harvard
as become the most
e of a new concept in
r called sociobiology,
mbling theory to the.
ks last evening, laun-
kend's Tanner Lec-
ogist said the com-
ent of our society,
en those qualities we
e part of "human
termined by a single
or genetic
innate drive to
s own genes in the
ene pool.
TO other recent
guments, Wilson's
iewhere between the
and the radical. A
"Is Sociobiology
as handed out to
0 people as they
Rackham Lecture
ized the theory as
sexism and Social
o is by trade an
oose to address the
st as the dean of Ter-

mite University to awaken them to
his claim that their culture is no
more sophisticated than that of the
insect world. Using his new identity,
he drew an elaborate analogy bet-
ween the effects of genetic control on
both the termite culture and our
own.
There's a reason for becoming a
temporary termite, according to
Wilson. "If you want to understand
man, you must stand far away."
IN HIS hour-long lecture, the
slightly built Wilson said that even
our ethical values are generally
determined. Therefore, the
philosopher must look to biology -to
construct ethical principles truly
relevant to the way society has
evolved.
As he states in his new book, On
Human Nature, Wilson said, "There
is a universal biologically-based
human nature." This is not a harmf-
ful idea, he continued, but a
liberating one since understanding
is necessary for useful action. "You
care only to the extent that you
know," he said.
In addition to Wilson's Tanner
Lecture last night, the Philosophy
Department has scheduled for today
three more events in the human
values symposium.

Samoff criticizes 'U'

A1l the j sh
aUnlimited Salad ar...
a, .or dona lY
so 9

L

(Continued from Page 1)
be able to determine wno else comes in,
and not be challenged in that deter-
mination," he stated.
SAMOFF SAID an institution is based
upon its power structure, not on the
rules by which it is supposed to operate.
"The more successful they (radical
faculty) are, the more threatening they
are to the forces of the University that
have to do with maintaining the present
order."
Samoff also said many faculty saw
the early 1970s as a "good moment for
reigning in dissidents" whose "poten-
tial allies were quiet." He said this gave
those in power the opportunity to

repress those voices in the University
whose actions ran counter to their own.
Therefore, Samoff said, the
struggle at the University over rules is
ultimately a struggle for power." He
also said the University decides which
of the various constituencies involved
should have the influential voice.
SAMOFF ALSO said the University
"fears to do something deviant" .
because it might lose its position in
comparative rankings with other in-
stitutions.
"But there is no institution that is so
tightly put together that there is no
room, no corners, no place to maneuver
(for dissident thoughts and actions),''
stated Samoff.

A GLIMPSE INTO DARKNESS
Conference on the Holocaust
APRIL 1.2& 3
APRIL 1 Emil Fackenhelm: "The Holocaust: Authentic and Unauthenic
Responses" KEYNOTE Address
2 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
Multi-Media Program:
Dance Performance: I NEVER SAW ANOTHER BUTTERFLY
Film: NIGHT AND FOG
Photographic and Wire Sculpture Exhibit
Panel Discussion: Personal Accounts of Survivors
7:15 pm Pendleton Room
APRIL 2 Rev. John T. Pawlikowskl: "Confronting the Holocaust from
a Christian Perspective" 7:30 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
APRIL 3 Henry Feingold: "The Politics of Rescue: The Roosevelt
Administration and the Holocaust" 7:30 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
Sponsored by: Michigan Student Assembly; Vice President for Academic
Affairs, University of Michigan; B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation; Program in
Judaic Studies; LSA-SG; Office of Ethics and Religion; Lord of Light Lutheran
Church; Program on Studies in Religion; Jewish Community Council of
Washtenaw County.

i

- s
Daily Official Bulletin :
SATURDAV, MARCH 31, 1979
SUMMER PLACEMENT
1200 SAB 7634117
Interviews:
Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio. Your last chance for A
a personal interview. Spend your summer outdoors
- make good money and new friends from other
universities. Will interview Weds., April 4 from 1 to S.
Scholarship Fopundation, Concord, N.H. Will in-
terview Thurs., Aug. 5 from 9 to 5. Interview various
potential sources for private scholarships. Travel
and meal expenses paid. Further information
available.
Camp Blue Ridge/Equinox, Pa. Coed. Will inter-
view Fri., Apr. 6 from 9 to 5. "Openings include "
specialists in waterfront (WS1) nature, drama,
sports, etc. Register in person or by phone.
Camp Tamarack, Mi. Coed. Will interview Thurs.,
Apr. 5 from 9:00 to 3:30. many' general openings
available - also specialists such as sports, nature,
dramatics, etc. Register in person or by phone.
Little Brothers of the Poor, Chicago, Ill. Will inter-
view Mon., April 9 from Ito 5. Work with those who a
need you most - children, families, elderly; assist
with cooking, shopping, maintenance, gardens. Fur-
ther details available. Register in person or by
phone.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(LISPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 144
Saturday, March 31, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street Ann Arbor, Michigan ;
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); 13 by,
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-.
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates:.:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
p aid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
RAGE?"

I

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN

Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Ponderosa is having a fabulous fish fry. For $2.49 you ccn
enjoy all the filet of sole you can eat, plus a piping hot bakedi
potato orfrench fries, and warm roll with butter. Plus unlimited
vists to our salad bar. Fhe Fabulous Fish Fry at Ponderosa.
Catch it, all day...

Last week we wrote of the retribution that follows evil
doing. "Be sure your sin will find you out," Numbers 32:23.
History reveals the truth of that statement. Only a very few
examples are given as follows:
"The domestic peace and prosperity of the good old
patriarch Jacob was sadly marred. He is compelled to
become at an early age, an exile from his father's house - to
flee before the aroused wrath of his brother - to suffer a long
oppression and wrong in the family of Laban, his kinsman;
and no sooner is he relieved from these domestic afflictions,
that suddenly he is bereaved of his favorite wife - Joseph is
violently torn from his embrace by his own sons - and at
length Benjamin, the only object on which the affections of
the aged father seemed to respose, must be yielded up to an
uncertain destiny, and his cry is heard: "All these things are
against me!"

he repented -and accepted the severe judgement of God,
reminding one of the words of Job: "Yea, though He slay me,
yet will I trust Him!"
Examples crowd upon us from every quarter; every
neighborhood furnishes them! Haman was hung on the
gallows he built for Mordecai. Dogs ate the carcass of Queen
Jezebel, and licked up the blood of her husband, King Ahab.
The Herods furnish fearful examples. But consider Pontius
Pilate: many of us quote his name every Sunday in public
worship: "Suffered under Pontius Pilatel"
"Pilate, vacillating between the monitions of conscience
and a miserable time serving policy, delivered up Jesus to be
crucified. He believed him to be Innocent; yet that his own
loyalty to Caesar might not be suspected, he did violence to
his conscience and condemned the innocent. He must
secure his friendship of Caesar, though it be at the expense
of the most appalling crime. But how miserably he failed; and

n ike-nut orders... offer good March 23 thru April 8.1

11

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