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January 12, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-12

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TheMichigan Daily-Friday, January 12, 1979-Page 5
} POL POT'S WHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN:

Cambodian leaders flee

BANGKOK (Reuter)-The new
Vietpamese-backed regime in Phnom
Penh yesterday established the
"People's Republic of Kampuchea"
while ousted Deputy Prime minister
Ieng Sary, possibly accompanied by
President Khieu Samphan, fled the
country for China.
Sary was believed to have been flown
out of the border town of Poipoet
yesterday by a Thai military helicopter
and taken to Bangkok to catch a flight,
to Hong Kong.
A BRITISH COLONIAL government
spokesman in Hong Kong said Sary was
stopping there briefly on his way to
Peking.
There was no reliable information on
the whereabouts of Prime Minister Pol
Pot, who has variously been reported
killed, already in Peking or still inside
Cambodia organizing a guerrilla cam-
paign.
Usually reliable sources said Sary
and Samphan had requested per-
mission to leave via Thailand for a third
country, but Thai Foreign Ministry of-
ficials Could not confirm whether Sam-
phan was on board the Hong Kong
flight.,
THE NEW REGIME in Phnom Penh,
which says the Pot government no
longer exists, said in a statement
broadcast by Hanoi radio that it had
changed Cambodia's name from
"Democratic Kampuchea" to the
"People's Democratic Republic of
Kampuchea."
It claims control of all Cambodia, but
Western diplomatic sources in Bangkok

and Pol Pot Foreign Ministry officials
at the Kampuchea-Thai border said
fighting was still going on.
Insurgent forces took Phnom Penh
last Sunday and set up an eight-man
People's Revolutionary Council on
Monday headed by former Khmer
Rouge commander Heng Samrin. The
regime has been recognized by Viet-
nam, Laos, Ethiopia, Afghanistan and
all the Soviet block European countries
except Romania.
The rebel radio yesterday broadcast
an appeal from the new regime's defen-
se minister to "youths and cadres in the
army to take care in defending the

country and destroy the enemy." This
was taken as an implicit admission that
resistance persisted.
The diplomatic sources in Bangkok
said scattered fighting was still going
on all over the country and Pol Pot
government officials here quoted by a
Thai border liaison officer in the
eastern border town' of Aranyaprathet,
opposite Poipet, as saying serious
fighting continued in the southwestern
Cambodian provinces of Koh Kong and
Pursat.
Mt. Everest, the highest mountain in
the world, is called Chomolungma in
Tibetan. The name means "goddess-
mother."

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Ed Pierce is finally smiling. The Ann Arbor Democrat, after two previous unsuccessful bids for public office, is shown
here in the State House. Pierce was recently inaugurated as Ann Arbor's new state senator.

Governor calls f

(Continued from Page 1)
party differences," he said.
The governor said he recognized the
failures of the past years in several
major policy areasabut quickly added
the influx of a. new and young group of
state legislators could lead to a "year of
great progress for Michigan.
"With the election year behind us,
with experienced leadership in both of
our branches, and with some im-
pressive new members in these cham-
bers today, we have a good opportunity
to work cooperatively for change," said
Milliken.
IN HIS 15-MINUTE speech Governor
Milliken stressed that although the
electorate approved several limits on
the power of the state legislators on the
November ballot, such as the Headlee
Amendment, he still believes that "an
age with limits need not be an age
without hope.
"Restraint need not halt progress. It
provides an incentive to reexamine and
revise. It's not going to hurt our basic
institutions to shake things up a bit," he
said.
But he failed to specifically mention,
to the surprise of some legislators, the
recently-passed tax limitation pro-
posal.
STATE REP. Perry Bullard (D-Ann
Arbor), back for his fourth term in Lan-

sing, said one of the top priorities of the
80th session of the Michigan State
Legislature is to solve the state's ever-
increasing tax problem, and that the
governor just wanted to "leave himself
open on the matter."
The Ann Arbor representative added
that the governor's heavy emphasis on
intra-party unity for the upcoming
session was just a weakly-disguised
message issued because "he had
nothing positive to propose.
"Other than the urban programs he
mentioned, everything else was only
proposals mentioned many times in the
past," said Bullard.
AMONG THOSE proposals announ-
ced by the governor include:
s aplan to establish a credit on the
single business tax for new em-
ployment in extremely high unem-
ployment urban areas.
* a move to double the' bonding
authorization of the Michigan State
Housing Development Authority, in-
creasing it by $900 million to $1.8 billion.
* an overall land resource planning
bill for the state.
To demonstrate his strong concern
for revitalizing Michigan's major
cities, Milliken announced the
designation of Lieutenant Governor
Brickley as the administration's urban

or unity
coordinator and head of a newly formed
community development cabinet.
"As I noted earlier, Michigan has a
well-deserved reputation as a national
leader in providing assistance to urban
areas. In the past, our efforts have
focused primarily on expanding the
economic base in urban areas, creating
new employment opportunities and
promoting neighborhood stability. We
must continue to move aggressively in
these areas," he said.
DURING LAST year's tense election
struggle, the governor was often
criticized for his administration's mis-
management of the PBB controversy
and documented abuses in some of the
state's mental health centers. Yester-
day, he tried to subdue that criticism by
pledging to mend the errors in both
areas.
"I again urge approval of legislation'
to provide for the monitoring of the use
of all toxic substances in this state from
manufacture to ultimate disposal," he
said.
"Our mental health system has gone
through a year of turmoil which has
tended to obscure the fact that it is one
of the finest in the nation.tOur task in
this area is to address the problem
which exist and make it an even better
system."

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Full house sees 'Birth of a Nation'

(Continued from Page 1)
Nation' is," and "Racsism (sic) is not
art." As one patron entered the
auditorium he shouted, "Bookbur-
ners !" at the picketers.
Cinema Guild originally intended for
a professor to speak on the film's inac-
curacies and historical distortions
before the screening, but two
professors who would have been
qualified to speak were unable to, for
various reasons,- according to
Honeyman.
A leaflet authored by film professor
Frank Beaver about the history of the
film, as well as its content, was handed
out by members of the guild. The
leaflet, a transcription of a WUOM
radio broadcast by Beaver on August 15
of last year, read in part, ". . . the film

v

can be viewed as a symbol of political
excessiveness and a propagandistic
display which works against equality
and justice in our country."
Beaver, who was present at the
screening, noted, "It's important we
continue to show the film, especially as
the (Ku Klux) Klan continues to use it."
The Ku Klux Klan, which is portrayed
favorably in the film, has been using it
to win support for its anti-black fen-
timent, according to an Associted Press
report printed on the same leaflet as
Beaver's broadcast.
Supporters of the boycott included
ministers from the Guild House, John
Powell of the University's Community
Services, Ellen Offen, director of
Project Community, Margarita Torres

of the Minority Student Services office,
Marti Bombyk, president of the
Graduate Employees Organization,
Kate Rubin of the Michigan Student
Assembly, and members of the Alpha
Phi Alpha fraternity. The Black
Student Union did not boycott the film
because most of its members had not
seen it, according to spokeswoman
Vicky Rowels.
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HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1979-80 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting January 16, 1979
In Ms. Charlene Coady's Office, 1500 SAB
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Head Resident, Resident Director, Assistant
Resident Director,-Resident Advisor, Head
Librarian, Resident Fellow, Minority Peer
Advisors and Graduate Student Teaching
Assistant
Advisory positions require the co pletion of a minimum of 55 credit hours by the end of the
1979 Winter Term for the Resident Fellows in Residential College, Resident Advisor and Minor-
ity Peer Advisor positions: Graduate status for Graduate Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot
Program, Head Librarian, Head Resident and Resident Director positions. However, qualified
undergraduate applicants may be considered for the Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a'registered U. of M. student on the Ann Arbor Cam-
pus during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours
by the endof the 1979 Winter term. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in
residence halls at University level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must
have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and graduate applicants must be in good academic
standing at the end of the 1978 Fall term in the school or college in which they are enrolled.
(5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to carry heavy academic schedules and
who do not have rigorous outside commitments. (6) Applicants with children will not be con-
sidered. (7) Proof of these qualifications may be required.

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