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January 12, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-12

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Page 6-Friday, January 12, 1979-The Michigan Daily
4U£

Michael Curtiz's

1942

CASABLANCA
A film in a class by itself. BOGART has his best good bad-guy role as a
nightclub owner in Casablanca, a place of intrigue and displaced persons in
WW 11. CLAUDE RAINS, PETER LORRE & SYDNEY GREENSTREET are various
breeds of scoundrels, and BERGMAN is radiant as Bogart's lost and found
again love. Come and see it "for the waters."
Sat: Woody Allen & Diane Keaton in SLEEPER
Sun: Bogart in THE CAINE MUTINY

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Civic's
BY DIANE HAITHMAN1
Ann Arbor Civic Theater's opening1
shot at Bertolt Brecht's Good Person of'
Szechwan was put on (and on and on)
Good Person of Szechwan
By Bertolt Brecht
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Shenteh/Shuita..........Constance Barron '
Wang ..... ..........G. Alexander Miller
Mrs. Wang......................Edna Williams
Yang Sun ............................. Ed Stein ,
The barber ..................Peter Greenquist
Mi Tzu............ Marilyn Kennedy
Lin To ......................Jim Kane
Mrs. Shin... ............... Aliza Shivrin 1
Klaus Bergmann, director; Richmond
Friedlund, sets; Marke Bowles and
Susan Maris, lighting; Eric Hansen,
musical director; Babr Mostaghin, costumes
with a gourmand's helping of en-
thusiasm and a somewhat smaller
treasure of performing prowess. As
might be expected in three full hours of

SINGERS * DANCERS * INSTRUMENTALISTS $170-$200/week
TECHNICIANS 5150-S175/week
Seasonal Performers being auditioned for:
KINGS ISLAND, Cincinnati, OH KINGS DOMINION, Richmond, VA
CAROWINDS, Charlotte, NC Hanna-Barbera's MARINELAND, LA, CA
Preliminary and Call-Back Auditions:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Student Union, Assembly Hall,
Toes., Jan. 30; 1-7 P.M.
Round-trip airfare paid for hired performers traveling over 250 miles to work at the parks.
KINGS PRODUCTIONS, CIncinnatI, Ohio 45219

I good
full-strength, unadulterated pithiness,
there's a message - and ample time to
catch it later if you miss it the first
twelve times around.
Good Person - nee - Good woman is
symbolic with a capital "S" - all
characters perform in masks. The issue
of Good vs. Evil loses its comfortable
black-and-white clarity as Brecht inter-
twines it with the notion of the dubious
societal utility of personal altruism.
A PLAY as long and problematic as
this one demands a high degree of
stamina from its cast in order to sustain
both its power and the attention of its
audience. Because of this, the Civic
Company may have bitten off a
healthier hunk than its amateur cast
can adequately chew, even though they
definitely chew it slowly. However, a
few very talented performers, the
superb technical care typical of Civic
productions, and the hearty
camaraderie of the troupe itself lend
scattered moments of pleasure to an
otherwise lukewarm theatrical
evening.
Luckily, most of the performers of
dubious quality fell into roles of
negligible importance to the overall ef-
fect of the play. The extras were just
that, extra: well costumed but unfor-
tunately expendable, if colorful, fluff.
J "
Join us.
Now what are you going to do? There
are large, corn-fed men at the door of
every tavern especially hired to make
sure that you don't have any fun; the
rotating sign in front of the Ann Arbor
Bank on the corner of South U. and East
E. reads nine degrees, again, and you
can't frolic in the Arb with your
significant other. You could sit by the
heater and read what other people have
to say about movies, plays, dances,
concerts and records, or you could
lumber over to the Daily and write your
own articles for some other sucker to
read. We do.
Informational meeting upstairs at the
Daily, Sunday at 5:30 p.m. Admission:
Free.

Pinball,
Billiards,
and o wling
OPEN 'til I am
FRI. and SAT.
at the UNION

ersons succeed

A few of CiVic's less notable actors
managed to squeak=into roles enough
for them to be annoying, however.
Alexander Miller, an absolutely en-
dearing gentleman, who would make a
great Santa Claus, just does not make a
very effective Wang (a poor water
seller in- Szechwan). He unabashedly
and cheerfully bumbles through the
play, dropping lines left and right that
get picked up all too obviously by other
members of the cast. It's hard for the
audience to avoid liking him - but the
same cannot be said for his performan-
ce.
ED STEIN, who plays Yang Sun, the
bad-seed boyfriend of leading-person
Shen-Teh (Constance Barron) is a
lawyer, not an actor. This becomes ap-
parent now and then throughout the
production. Although his attempt suf-
fices, there is little to distinguish him
from any other reasonably competent,
good-looking leading man. One comes
away remembering little about him.
But, happily, some of Civic's best are
given ample opportunity to flaunt their
gifts for character comedy in suppor-
ting roles. Peter Greenquist, as Shu Fu,
the ultra-conventional, ingratiating
barber, sends Civic's primarily white-
haired audience into fits of undignified
giggles as he cartwheels in the ecstasy
of his love for Shen Teh. The three gods
who come to Szechwan to find one
really "good" person in an evil world
(Bob Gatzke, Bob Mueting, and George
Tsiros) delight by giving Deity a little
touch of the Marx Brothers. Their ef-
fect is, enhanced by the marvelous
costumes of Barbara Mostaghian -
complete with ersatz heads bearing
almost alarmingly realistic features.
And Aliza Shivrin as the Widow Shin,
the nosy, penny-pinching Wicked Witch
of Szechwan, +,takes everyone who
comes her way for all he's got. And his.
little dog, too.
Constance Barron, in her neatly-
handled dual role as Shen Teha heart-
of-gold former prostitute, and Shen
Teh's cousin, Shui Ta, is the Good Per-
son of Szechwan. She is also the best ac-
tress of Civic. Her extensive
professional performing experience
almost makes a comparison between
her stunning performance and those of
the rest of the company unfair. As well
as possessing a fine voice and lofty
stage presence, Barron has the audien-

ce almost believing she is two people -
one of whom is male. Shen Teh is por-
trayed as a sweet, shrinking violet -
but Shui Ta is a hard-driving, caustic
workaholic, hiding behind a suit, tie,
and Foster Grants. The audience
remains riveted to her performance
almost to the exclusion of the rest of the
action. She makes the cold walk to
Mendelssohn worthwhile.
MUSIC IN this production is very
weird; it is eerie and cacaphonic. But a
few surprisingly lovely voices are
heard periodically, as well as a nicely
handled ensemble piece in the second
act, which is probably the closest
Brecht ever came to musical revue.
However, the style is definitely an
acquired taste.
Although occasional naps during the
performance are almost obligatory, if
your alternatives are an unfinished
New York Times crossword puzzle or
the last half of that same old Bogart
movie tonight, trudge on over to Men
delssohn and collect what jewels you
can from The Good Person. Harsh
critics with no soft spot in their flinty
hearts for amateur theater are Warned:
They might best choose to stay at home
and write nasty letters to the Editor of
something - save this one for the en-
joyment of the Good People of Ann Ar-
bor who just plain like plays, flaws and
all.
Scholarship
aid hiked
(continued from Page1)
is a great differential in tuition costs of
in-state and out-of-state students, so the
bright students who reside outside of
the state find the costs of this Univer-
sity comparable to private schools and
schools within their own states."
For the 1978-79 academic year tuition
costs for frespersons and sophomores
who are Michigan residents was $1,174,
whereas the figure for out-of-state un-
derclasspersons was $3,474.
ALTHOUGH THE SAT scores for in-
state high school students has in-
creased over the past three years, ad-
missions office figures indicate a sub-
stantial decline in out-of-state students'
scores has been great enough to force
the total average scores for all students
to a low level. Sjogren said that a
major reason for the low scores was
that the University did not actively
recruit highly talented out-of.state
students. He said the revamped
program should alleviate these
inadequacies.
Grotrian said most of the funding for
merit scholarships is derived from
private sources such as the Alumni An-
nual Giving Program, and that all of
the awards would not be renewable af-
ter the first year.
Grotrian also said he is optimistic
that the revised merit scholarship
program would be continued after the
1979-80 academic year.
"There is an excellent possibility that
these programs will continue," said
Grotrian. "After next year we will
assess the success of the merit scholar-
ships, and observe to what degree we
are influencing the quality of incoming
students."

4U.
(Joh
The
mo
che
TV's
Fri.
(Ro
wh
mo
fics
ow
Sat
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a
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g.0
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I

AC- MEDIATRICS

KEN WCKY FRIED MOVIE
in Landis, 1977) The smashingly successful satirical revue group from the Kentucky Fried
atre in Los Angeles hits new comedy heights in this hilarious spoof of television and the
ies. The KENTUCKY FRIED crew pokes fun at the American establishment and our
rished media, and their humor is even more outrageous and pointed in its satire than
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE.
Jan. 12 Assembly Hall, Mich Union 7, 8:30, 10
---and
3 WOMEN
Bert Altman, 1977) A complex yet thoroughly lucid and accessible tale of three women
use lives Itrangely intertwine as each searches for her true identity. Altman creates a
d of suspense and anticipation as the bizarre fates of his Protagonists merge. "its speci-
are so real you can almost touch them, and its conclusion so surreal we can supply our
n."-Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES.
jan.13 Not Sci Aud 7:00 & 9:15
ADMISSION $1.50

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at MLB 3
Friday & Saturday, January 12 & 13
SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER
(John Badham, 1977) 7&9-MLB3
Disco dance king in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn takes steps toward growing
up. With no-holds barred language,, a candid description of teen-age sex this
film is a mixture of entertainment and raw situations. A right-on-target film
with script by Norman Wexler (JOE, SERPICO), with the ultimate disco score by
the Bee Gees and David Shire. All shot on location, unquestionably the best,
steamiest disco scenes ever put on film. Starring JOHN TRAVOLTA and KAREN
GORNEY. "Outstanding film! "-CUE.
Monday: Lubitsch's THE OYSTER PRINCESS & MADAME DUBARRY

; S* 8A B~s s A.S-*SASS 9 eASS

EXPREfJ

I.

------

-I

Now Showing, Campus Area Butterfield Theatres

V'OURf ELF ifl
flOR-WEEJUfl,,
Make a beautiful statement in
Bass Nor-Weejuns. The bouncy,
corpfy feeling of clogs. In a
dressy new look. And pure
Bass every step of the way.
Bass Nor-Weejuns: They
speak your language.

} r /
' , ,

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT"
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FOR PRICE OF ONE

...

ADULTS FRI., SAT., SUN.
EVE. & HOLIDAYS $3.50
MON.-TRURS. EV. $3.00
ALL MATINEES $2.50
CHILD TO14 $1.50

.

--f

-.Ad

y '
THlE A A~

y .
.. ..
)rJ
{
i,

M
N

STATE FRI. & AT MIDNIGHT SHOIW
THEATREand, Emmerson Lake & Palmer
"Rock $ Rol! Your Eyes"

I

YOO CAN
LEAR.N TO
This Winter At
Special U of M Rates

1

k

LEvery Tuesday afternoon begin-
ning January 16 through February 20.
OCourses for Everyone - Beginning,
Intermediate, Advanced Skiers.
QBuses leave Ann Arbor 12:00
noon - returning 5:00 p.m.
L] One (1) hour lesson, tows,
rental equipment and trans-
portation - $85.00
QOne (1) hour lesson, tows, and
transportation (you supply your own
rquipment) - $60.00
Register NOW at North Campus
Recreation Building, 2375 Hubbard
(across from Bursley Hall) - Phone
763-4560
Open 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday from
Dec. 11 to Dec. 22 and
Jan. 2 to Jan. 12. First ski

m

!

....

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