100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 24, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Saturday, March 24, 1979-The Michigen Daily
~palJff]

Church Worship Services

Begin arrives to sign treaty;
diplomats debate final points

J I _J C_ CJ l J C -_f ICJ C C 1l' 'J C 'J

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m.and 11a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev."Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
FULL GOSPEL HOLY GHOST
BELIEVING MINISTRY
at THE SALVATION ARMY CHAPEL
9 S. Park Street
Ypsilanti, Michigan
482-4700
Sunday Worship-1:30 to 3:30 p.rb.
Wednesday Worship-7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Acts 2:39, 1 Cor.12.
Note: We will only be at the Salva-
tion Army Chapel until April 18, New
location unknown as, of yet.
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Lynette Bracy, Mike Pennanen,
Shirlev Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6: 15-Worship Fellowship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service. A
luncheon will follow the Worship Serv-
ice. All are welcome to join us.
Monday, March 26:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at the Wesley Foundation
(corner of State & Huron). To examine
our lifestyles in light of the world
hunger/ecology/justice situation.
Tuesday, March 27:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at Lord of Light.
Wednesday, March 28:
7:00 p.m.-Choir practice; new choir
members are always welcome!
8:30 p.m.-Bible Study; a study of the
history and theology of the Old
Testament; led by Gary Herion, a
doctoral student in Old Testament
studies. -
** * * .
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sivth State St.
Rev: Andrew Foster, Chaplain
$VNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors .-programs in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel freeto call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LOIS
Robert Kavasch, Interim Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study-Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Mrikawa, Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Submission to
Discipline"-Mr. Morikawa.
11 a.m.-College Bible Study-"Wo-
men in the Bible."
5:30 p.m.-Dinner-Lenten Services
-Panel discussion on "Preparation for
Bereavement.and Death."
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Morning Worship-Sermon:
'Conversion as a Dance..
6 p.m.-Service of Praise.
* * *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
Phone: 429-2139
10:30 Sunday Morning, March 25-
Topic Title: "The Other Side-Con-
sidering Heaven." A group discussion
6f what we might expect after death;
your own fantasies or expectations and
readings are welcome.
Quote of the Week:
"There was the door to which I found
no key;
There was the yeil'through which
I might not see:
Some little talk awhile of Me and
THEE
There was-and then no more of
THEE ANL4ME."
-Omar Ihayyam

From AP and Reuter
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin arrived in New
York yesterday en route to the White House to sign a peace
treaty with Egyptian President Anwar Sadst that both
leaders and President Carter hope will open an era of peace
in the Middle East.
Sadat made final arrangements before departure today for
Washington, where he, Begin and Carter plan to affix their
signatures Monday to a pact that will officially end 31 years
of war between the two Middle East nations.
AMERICAN OFFICIALS expressed confidence yesterday
that negotiators will be able to tie up the last, loose ends of
the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty in time for next week's
signing ceremony.
Egyptian, Israeli and American officials held a flurry of
meetings during the day in an attempt to agree on three un-
settled issues in the documents accompanying the treaty:
" The exact timing of the Israeli withdrawal from the
Alma oil field in the Sinai Desert. Egypt wants control of the
field six months after the signing of the treaty, but Israel
says the turnover should take nine months.
" The wording of a U.S. commitment to Israel to "take ac-
tion" in case the pact is violated. The State Department in-
sists U.S. action should be conditional on consultation with
Congress. Israel wants a more unconditional accord.
* The legal language in a memo that would commit the
United States to sell Israel oil at maret prices in case Israel
can't buy fuel on the world market. The 15-year accord would
replace a five-year U.S. commitment made in 1975.
In addition, officials said, there is still a question about who

will sign the American memos - President Carter or
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance - and what legal force the:
notes will have.
It appeared yesterday that talks on the issues might run
through the weekend - possibly until the eve of the signing
ceremony.
IN A BRIEF arrival statement at New York's Kennedy
Airport, Begin said the Washington signing ceremony might
be followed by similar ceremonies "in Jerusalem and Cairo,.
the capitals of our two nations."
He offered congratulations to President Sadat for reaching
a treaty with Israel and praised President Carter fors
bringing the two sides together.
Begin, in anwer to questions about Palestinian Liberation-
Organization (PLO) chairman Yasser Arafat's threat to un-
do the treaty, said: "The PLO Is the most barbaric
organization since the Nazis, their barbaric attacks will be
dealt with."
Begin sternly warned Arafat he will "burn his fingers" if
he tries to undermine the pact.
Fears that Palestinian protests against the treaty could
produce more violence seemed borne out when a bomb ex-"
ploded in central Jerusalem, injuring 15 people, , few hours
after Begin's plane took off.
In Damascus, Palestinian commandos last night claimed
responsibility for the blast. The Palestine news agency.
WAFA said the guerrillas planted bombs which killed or;
wounded about 30 people and caused heavy damage. It said,
Israeli police detained more than 50 Arabs after the ex
plosion, but failed to catch the commandos.

'PEANUT PROBE' CONTINUES:
Bell widens counsel

's

powers

From AP and Reuter
The Carter Administration acted
yesterday to silence Republican
criticism of its handling of an in-
vestigation into allegations about bank
loans \to President Carter's family
peanut business.
Attorney General Griffin Bell an-
nounced broader powers for the special
counsel investigating the charges and
said the changes should provide the
same degree of independence that
Watergate prosecutors had.
BELL HAD BEEN under sharp at-
tack from Republican members of
Congress because he named Paul
Curran, a New York Republican, to be
special counsel rather than special
prosecutor.
Under a formal charter issued by
Bell's office yesterday, Curran will
have authority to seek indictments
without clearing his decision with
anyone in the Justice Department.
However, Curran still would be
required to get Bell's approval before
granting immunity to any witness in
exchange for testimony.
BELL SAID at a; news conference
that restriction also applied to
Watergate prosecutors. He said it is a
requirement of law that the attorney
general approve any request to a court
for immunity for a witness.
Bell said he saw 'no analogy" bet-
ween the Watergate scandal and the
current investigation into more than
$6.5 million in loans from the National

Bank of Georgia to the Carter family
peanut warehouse.
"There is a vast difference," he said.
"We had a great deal of evidence of
crime in government in Watergate."
He said that in calling Curran a
"special counsel" rather than
prosecutor he was underscoring
Curran's role as a fact-finder.
"I'M INTERESTED now in the truth
being brought out. I want to get
someone started on it," Bell said.
The attorney general said he believed
the furor caused by his annogncement
on Tuesday that Curran would not be
completely independent of the Justice
Department was a misunderstanding
over technicalities.
Asked if he believed his announ-
cement would silence Republican
critics, Bell replied, "I certainly don't
think so. If I were on that side, I'd keep
going till I ran out of breath."
THE PRESIDENT owns 62 per cent
of the Carter warehouse, but'his shares
have been placed in a "blind trust."
Carter's brother Billy, who owns 22 per
cent of the business, was primarily in
dharge of the operation during the
years in question. The President's
mother, Lillian Carter, owns the rest of
the shares in the peanut business.
Congressional critics, especially
Republicans, had been demanding
more than a grant of broad authority to
an investigator appointed by Bell.
Critics of Bell's decision to name
Curran as "special counsel" have said

A Public Service of this newspaper & The Advertising Council.

they want a full-fledged special
prosecutor completely independent of
the Justice Department and indepen-
dent of Bell, who was named attorney
general by Carter.
Curran's investigation will focus- on-
allegations that there wet'e
irregularities in loans from the
National Bank of Georgia, made to the
Carter peanut business during 1976 and
1977. The allegations Curran will study
involve double use of collateral, hiding
of late payment of loans and allegations
that loan money was funneled into Car-
ter's presidential campaign.
Water from ti.e Amazon River is
drinkable for 100 miles after it em-
pties into the Atlantic Ocean.
Daily Official Bulletin
Saturday, March 21, 1979
SUMMERd PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 763411
INTERVIEWS:
Irish Hills Girls Scout Council, M. will interview
Wed.. Mar 28 from 9 to noon. Openings include until
counselors, waterfront WSIl, cooks, nurse and
program specialists.
Camp Echo Lake, N. Y. Coed. Will interview Wed.,
March 28 from 11:00 to 4:30. All general positions
open including specialists as - waterfront (WSI).
nature, athletics, arts, crafts, sports, etc. Register in
person or by phone.
Camp Niobe, Mi. Handicapped. Will interview
Fri., Mar. 23 fromIto 5. Openings include waterfront
(WSI), art specialists, dance, drama, art, etc. and
general counselors. Register in person or by phone.
Camp Maplehurst, Mi. coed. Will interview Mon.,~
Mar. 26 from ito 5. Openings,-- waterfront(WSI),
arts/crafts, nature, sports, athletics, and many
others.
Camp Oakland, Mi. Handi. Will interview Tues.,
Mar. 27 from 1 to 5. Openings include - assistant,,
director, specialists in waterfront (WSI), archery.
arts/crafts and general b'ounselors. Register in per-
son or by phone.
Camp Tamarack, Mi. Coed. Will interview Thurs.,a
Mar. 29 from 9 to 5. Openings in many fields still
open. Register in person or by phone.
City of Oak Park, Mi. Will interview Thurs., Mar.
29 from 9 to 5. Openings in wide fields-day camp
counselors, playground leaders, arts/craft
specialists, tot-lot leaders, baseball/softball um-
pires. Register by phone or in person.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 138
Saturday, March 24, 1979
is edited and managed by students at-
the University of Michigan. Published:
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420:
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan;
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); 13 by-
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses
sion published Tuesday through Satur--
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann rbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage;
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard-
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

OL "l 11 ".
i1 r 117 t 1II -

1

L

Are you
fed up with
RISING
PRICES?
Then here's

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
haven't gone up at
C71hie 3i74-an a iI
764-0558

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

,4

Call Red Cross
today aboutlernng CPR-
cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Why do we have riots? Who is responsibile? Read Isaiah
3:10.11: "Say ye to the righteous, that it shall bey well with
them ... Woe unto the wicked! It shall be ill with him for the
reward of his hands shall be given him.
THE VOICE OF RETRIBUTION: "FOR I THE LORD THY
GOD AM A JEALOUS GOD, VISITING THE INIQUITY OF
THE FATHERS UPON THE CHILDREN UNTO THE THIRD
AND FOURTH GENERATION OF THEM THAT HATE ME;
AND SHOWING MERCY UNTO THOUSANDS OF THEM
THAT LOVE ME AND KEEP MY COMMANDMENTS." -
Part of the Second Commandment, Exodus 20:5,6.
History makes some singular developments in respect to
the retributive justice of God. Nations, communities,
families. individuals, furnish fearful illustrations that "Ilie

a blight somewhere upon all that he possesses. History bears
at least an incidental yet decisive testimony on this point.
Perilous it is indeed to a man's well being in this life - to
his peace, his reputation, his best interest - to do wrong.
Possibly the wrong doer may not suffer himself, yet most
certainly his children, and his children's children will pay the
penalty of his misdeeds. Man is undoubtedly so constituted,
whether regard be had to his physical, social, intellectual,
and moral nature, as to make him a happy being. The right,
the unpervertsd use of all his powers and susceptibilities
would not fail to secure to him a high and continual state of
earthly happiness and prosperity.
And not only is the human machine itself so fitted up as to
accomplish such an end, but the whole external world, the
theater in which Man has to live, act, and enjoy, is fitted up in

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan