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March 24, 1979 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-24

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, March 24, 1979-Page 3

rp,
Dr. Diag on the lam
Dr. Diag's trash can discourses, long known as a local institution,
may be a thing of.the past. Richard Robinson, alias Dr. Diag, was
scheduled to appear in 15th District Court yesterday for sentencing on
an assault and battery charge involving a University student. What
happened? Nothing-'cause Robinson didn't show up. "I'm going to
leave Ann Arbor for the University of Virginia," Robinson told a Daily
reporter Monday. "They don't appreciate me around here. It (being
Dr. Diag) is a thankless job." No legal action has been taken against
Robinson as of yet for his failure to appear in court. However, there is
a strong possibility that Robinson's presence in Ann Arbor will soon
be truly in demand-by officers of the 15th District Court.
A ttention, 1980 grads
It's never too early to start think about getting your lovely mug
recorded for posterity, according to the folks at the Michiganensian. If
you are expecting to graduate in 1980, the yearbook people want you to
know. that pictures are being taken for next year's 'Ensian. For an ap-
pointment, stop by the Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard St.,
during business hours, or call 764-0561 between 7 and 9 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
New Clements Library hours
The William Clements Library, located at 909S. University, will now
be open from 9 a.m. to 5 pm. Previously, the library was colsed from
noon to 1 p.m. The extended hours are intended to accommodate
students and the general puiblic who wish to view the Library's
exhibits. The Clements Library is open Monday through Friday.

AMBASSADOR SLAYING STILL MYSTERY

Killer search

N
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - In-
vestigators from three nations joined
forces yesterday to try to track down
the killers of a British ambassador and
a Belgian banker, and to determine
whether the slayings were linked in an
international plot of political murder.
British, Dutch and Belgian police of-
ficials were known to be checking the
possibility that the Irish Republican
Army was responsible for the slaying
Thursday of British Ambassador Sir
Richard Sykes in the Netherlands, and
for the murder later Thursday of
banker Andre Michaux in Brussels.
DUTCH police said they were sure
Sykes, cut down by two gunmen outside
his home in The Hague, was the inten-
ded target of that attack. But Belgian
authorities seculated that the two men
who several hours later shot Michaux
may have mistaken nim for a neighbor,
said to be an assistant to Britain's
NATO representative.
Dutch police, noting Brussels is only
a two-hour ride by train or car from The
Hague, said it was possible the killings
were carried out by the same assailan-

ts. They were meeting with Belgian
authorities and with two agents sent to
The Hague by Scotland Yard.
In Amsterdam, the daily newspaper
De Telegraaf said yesterday it received
an anonymous call claiming Sykes was
killed by the IRA, which is fighting to
oust the British from Northern Ireland.
THE NEWSPAPER reported the
caller, speaking with an Irish accent,
warned, "This is only the beginning.
It's war. Tomorrow we will kill either
the ambassador in Belgium, France or
Germany," apparently meaning the
British envoys in those countries.
The call could not be authenticated. A
Dutch police spokesman said it was
being taken seriously but not con-
clusively.
In Belfast, Northern Ireland, two
newspapers reported receiving calls
purporting to be from IRA
Provisionals, the group waging the
guerrilla war, saying both killings
"could be the work of our groups, but if
it is, we know nothing about it." In a
subsequent check, however,
Provisional sources denied such a

>egins
statement had been made to the
newspapers.
SYKES, 58, and his Dutch valet,
Karel Straub, 20, were fatally shot by
two gunmen as the envoy was
preparing to drive from his home to his
office.
Michaux, 47, was killed as he parked
his car outside his home in suburban
Brussels.
Diplomatic sources disclosed that the
house directly across the street from
the Michaux residence is occupied by a
British diplomat, whom they identified
as Paul Holmer, assistant to Britain's
permanent representative at NATO, Sir
John Killick.
Neither Holmer nor Killick could be
reached by reporters for comment.

Join
~the
Arts
Page

ROBERT MOORE'S

1976

MURDER BY DEATH
"YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO DINNER AND A MURDER. . ." So begins
the invitation sent to five fathead detectives by an eccentric millionaire
(menacingly played by Truman Capote?). Classier than last year's THE
CHEAP DETECTIVE. All star cast: Alec Guinnes, Peter Falk, David Niven,
Maggie Smith, and Peter Sellers. "Neil Simon displays his usual killer's
instinct for sharp, savvy comedy."
Sunday: Brando as THE WILD ONE
Monday: THE RED SNOWBALL TREE (Free at 7:00)

Cuban exile terrorists
receive life sentences

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Take ten
On March 24, 1979, the Literary College's (LSA) Executive Commit-
tee said it would ask the Senate Assembly to consider the question of
the relationship of ROTC and the University. At the same time, the.
LSA Curriculum Committee decided to maintain academic credit for
ROTC, but to no longer include ROTC grades in student's cumulative
grade point averages. That evening, Former Interior Department
Secretary Stewart Udall urged a crowd of over 700 in the League
Ballroom to "look inward" at the "shortcomings" of American life.
"Our country is simultaneously becoming more polluted, more
blighted, and less liveable," he said.
Happenings
FILMS
Dutch Film Festival-"Mariken van Nieumeghen," 1 p.m., "Rem-
brabdt fecit 1669," 2:45 p.m., Aud A, Angell.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Deliverance, 7 p.m.; Godfather II, 9 p.m.,
MLB Aud. 3.
Cinema Guild-Murder By Death, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch Aud.
Alternative Action-Blue Collar, 7,9:15 p.m., MLB Aud. 4.
Cinema II-The Last Waltz, 7,9:30, midnight, Angell Aud. A.
Mediatrics-Pretty Baby, 7,9:30 p.m., Union Assembly Hall.
East Quad Films-"Contempt," 10 p.m., midnight, Residential
College Auditorium.
PERFORMANCES
Eclipse Jazz-"Oregon" 7:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
Russian Festival-Russian Dance, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Canterbury Loft-"Anita Bryant Follies", 8 p.m., Canterbury Loft,
332S. State St.
PTP-"RED Roses for Me," 8p.m., Arena Theater. Frieze bldg.
Music School-Menotti's "Fantasies in Opera, Dance," 8 p.m., .
Power Center.
Museum of Art-Russian Piano Music, Louis Nagel, pianist, 8 p.m.,
Museum of art.
SPEAKERS
Kelsey Museum-"The Archaeology and History of Carthage,"
symposium, 9 a:m.,-1 p.m., Hussey room, Michigan League.
Women Law Students Association-"Women and Legal Careers,"
seminar, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Room 100, Hutchins Hall.
Americans for Democratic Action-"Where do we go from here?"
Women's Issues Seminar, 1-4 p.m., Room 120, Hutchins Hall.
Vietnam Update: "An Eveing of Informal Political Discussion and
Clarification," 8p.m., 429 Mason Hall.,
An Arbor Friends-Kenpo Kathar Rinpoche, "Tibetian Buddhism:
Meditation and Philosophy," 8-9 p.m., Friends Meeting House, 1420
Hill Street.
MISCELLANEOUS
Sign up for your senior portrait-9 a.m. - 9 p.m., 420 Maynard or call
764-0561.
Women's Career Fair-workshops begin at 9 a.m., Aud. 3, ML B.
Department of atmospheric and'oceanic science Open House-10
a.m.-6 p.m., Space Research Building, North Campus.
Science for the People: A National Conference-workshops on
nuclear policy, occupational health and safety, farm labor organizing
and support, working with unions, 1 p.m., Union Kuenzel Room.
Blac Music Festival-Midtown Disco, 8 p.m., Couzens Cafeteria.
Halfway Inn-Women's songs and Latin Folk Music, 8p.m., Half-
way Inn, East Quad.
Rackham Spring Mixer-8 p.m., Rackham Bldg.
IS
Nyet on rain
Even though the American team scheduled to compete in the 1980
Olympics hasn't been selected yet, the Soviets are already promising
sunshine for the opening day of competition-actually they're guaran-
teeing it. According to Moscow Radio, an aircraft squadron will be
ready for dispersing any rain clouds that might threaten the com-
petition. The planes will be able to seed any ominous clouds, forcing
the rain out of them before they would reach the main stadium in
Moscow.
.*
West Coast shuffle
Every year the rent of most apartments and houses in Ann Arbor
jumps about 15 per cent. But tenants at a plush San Francisco apar-
tment builing were rather shocked last week when they were told
their rents would be increased by as much as $300 a month. Last Thur-
sday, however, after publicity of the increases, the landlords reneiged
and cut the increases in half. So now, tenants living in a $360 apar-
tment will have to pay only $415 instead of $500 in monthly rent. The
building managers defended the increases "because of the rapid rate
of inflation over the past year." They added that even with the in-
creases; "a large gap" exists between market value and rent. Hmmm,

WASHINGTON (Reuter) - Two
Cuban exiles convicted of murder in the
1976 car bomb slaying of former
Chilean Foreign Minister Orlando
Letelier were sentenced to life im-
prisonment yesterday.
A third Cuban right-wing militant has
been sentenced to eight years. He had
been found guilty of perjury and failure
to report a crime.
RELATIVES OF the three Cubans
shouted "long live Cuba" and "down
with communism" as Judge Barrington
Parker announced the sentences in U.S.
District Court in Washington.
U.S. Marshals escorted the group of
weeping relatives out of the courtroom.
Guillermo Novo and Alvin Ross,
members of the Cuban Nationalist
Movement (MNC), were convicted
February 14 on four counts of murder in
a plot allegedly masterminded by the
Chilean intelligence service to kill
Letelier, a leading exiled foe of the
miltary junta.
THE FORMER Foreign Minister and
his American assistant, Ronni Moffitt,
were killed when a bomb attached un-
der the car exploded as they drove
along Washington's "embassy Row" on.
September 21, 1976.
The two convicted murderers each
were sentenced to serve two con-
secutive life terms for their part in the
conspiracy.

The third convicted MNC member,
Ignacio Novo, Guillermo Novo's
brother, had been found guilty of lying
to the grand jury investigating the
crime and failing to report it to the
authorities.
DEFENSE LAWYERS announced
they will appeal the sentences.
Michael Townley, from Waterloo,
Iowa, has admitted placing the bomb on
the car. But he became the govenment's
key witness in exchange for a lesser
charge and the promise of an early
parole. He has not been sentenced yet.
The Cuban Nationalist Movement
has long been involved in an inter-
national campaign to overthrow the
government of Cuban President Fidel
Castro.
TWO OTHER MNC members,
Vitgilio Paz and Jose Suarez, have also
been charged with murder in the
Letelier case. They are both being
sought by U.S. authorities.
"In my 10 years as a judge, I have not
seen a crime as monsterous and savage
as this one," Judge Parker told the
three convicted Cubans.
"You have abused and offended the
hospitality of this country, and brought
with you fanaticism and hatred," he
told the exiles.
All three defenants denied guilt in the
killing of Letelier and Moffitt and
charged that they had been made
scapegoats by U.S. authorities.

DIR. PAUL SCHRADER 1978
BLUE COLLAR
With RICHARD PRYOR, YAPHET KOTTO, HARVEY KEITEL. Three Detroit auto
workers, tired of being full-time factory zombies, conspire to rob the union
safe as a way to free themselves from their work. 'Blue Collar' entertains,
but it nonetheless refrains from the cotton-candy approach so common to
American movies.
"There are few films around with half of Blue Collar's brains and grist."
-Newsweek.
TONITE at 7 & 9:15-MLB 4
ALTERNATIVE ACTION FILM SERIES

IN DOLBY'!!i

Martin Scorcese's

THE LAST WALTZ.,
Where else but Aud. A can you see NEIL YOUNG, DR. JOHN, JONI
MITCHELL, BOB DYLAN, VAN MORRISON, MUDDY WATERS, EMMYLOU HAR-
RIS, NEAL DIAMOND, ERIC CLAPTON, and THE BAND together on one stage?
THE LAST WALTZ is Director Martin Scorcese's (TAXI DRIVER) tribute to THE
BAND. The film eclipses other concert films in the vividness of its pho-
tography, the insight provided by the interviews, and above all the mas-
terfulness of the musicianship. The Band's Robbie Robertson emerges as a
matinee idol and heartthrob to all those with hormones in working order. "Oh
Man!" Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
Sun-Richard Benjamin Night-GOODBYE
COLUMBUS & DIARY OF A MAD HOUSEWIFE
TONITE at Angell Hall Aud. "A"
7:00, 9:30, & 12:00 $1.50

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at MLD 3
Saturday, March 24
DELIVERANCE
(John Boorman, 1972) 7 only-MLB 3
A tense, action packed, sometimes friahtenina narrative of four friends who
take a canoe trip in the Georgia wilderness. Based on the James Dickey
novel with Dickey portraying a~Southern sheriff. Solid performances by JON
VOIGHT, BURT REYNOLDS.
THE GODFATHER, PART 11
(Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) 9 only-MLB 3
In expanding the themes and scope of the original, Coppola has succeeded
in adding resonance and power to an already brilliant vision. The players
are AL PACINO, ROBERT DE NIRO, LEE STRASBERG, and DIANE KEATON.
"Makes movies once again seem a miraculous medium."-Pauline Kael.
"Nothing personal . . . just business."
MONDAY: Nicholas Ray's
THEY LIVE BY NIGHT & THE LUSTY MEN

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