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March 13, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-13

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Page 2-Tuesday, March 13, 1979-The Michigan Daily
2nd Anual Carpenter Lecture
in theiehavio ,l Sciences
in Education
"Double Loop Learning:
Implications for Individual and
Organizational Development"
Dr. Chris Argyris
Harvard University Graduate School of Education
WESDA Y, MARCH 13,1X979-4-6 pm
SCHORLING AUDIORIUM-School of Education

Seminar probes space program

By HAROLD BIDLACK
"One man's magic is another man's
engineering."
With this quote from the works of
Robert Heinlein, space scientist Dr.
David Tauesch-a U-M Space Sciene
Committee member and program
organizer-opened a seminar of
teachers at the University's Chrysler
Center last Saturday.
The seminar was set up to "take the
mystery out of the space program,"
Tauesch said. A panel of 10 experts, in-
cluding Skylab II astronaut and
University graduate Jack Lousma and
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
Department chairman and noted scien-
tist Thomas Donahue, conducted lec-
tures and workshops for some 150
science teachers from schools all over
Michigan.
BEING AN ASTRONAUT, Lousma
was clearly the most popular speaker.
The Ann Arbor native spent 59 days in
orbit around the Earth while manning

the second of three Skylab missions in
the early 1970's. In his tal, Lousma
noted that there had been three basic
objectives to Skylab: a study of the sun
using a number of different telescopes;
a study of the Earth and its resources;
and a study of human physiology and
the effects on the body of long exposure
to the vacuum of space.
Lousma explained that over 50 ex-
periments were carried on aboard
Skylab for his mission and that most of
these were repeated several times. One
of the more famous of these tests was
executed on Arabella, a live spider. The
purpose was to see how a spider would
spin a web while weightless. The spider
received extensive media coverage and
Lousma complained, "It was a bit
discouraging to work 16 hours per day
on hard science, and then find out that
all the press was interested in was the
spider."
Lousma, who with fellow astronaut
Fred Haise will fly the third space shut-

tle mission, stated that the shuttle will
inaugurate "a greater opportunity to
fly in space that ever before. Lousma
was questioned about a wide range of
subjects, including "What type of elec-
trical power did you have on board
Skylab?" and "How did you go to the
bathroom in space?" His answer to the
latter question was; "The same way
you do on Earth, it's after you go when
it becomes interesting."
DONAHUE TOLD OF the results
from the two probes which have visited
Venus and Jupiter in recent weeks. The
Pioneer-Venus reported on the com-
position of the cloud-shrouded Venutian
atmosphere.
He said that the probes which made
up the Pioneer were tracked with Ear-
th-based radar as they entered the
clouds of Venus. This he said, was
analogous to "tracking the minute hand
of a watch in Los Angeles with a radar
station in Boston."
DR. JARMAN KENNARD, a NASA

scientist; spoke on the vast number of
benefits derived from the space
program while University engineer
Richard French displayed some of the
simulators which he built, including a
lunar landing simulator and a machine
which demonstrates the orbit of a
spacecraft around Earth. Several sam-
ples of the lunar soil were loaned to the
seminar by the Michigan Space.Center
in Jackson.
The seminar was developed from an
idea by Vivian Green, of the Univer-
sity's State and Community Relations
department, which provided part of the
funding for the seminar. Money was
also provided by several groups within
the University, including the College of
engineering.
Green added that the seminar might
become an annual event. "We have ap-
plied to the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW) and the
National Science Foundation for fun-
ding. Everyone here has volunteered
their time, but there are expenses."

Hell-raising in

Fri
its
Q I

SPECIAL
7-11 p.m.

HALF PRICE
On
BEER
ednesday-HaIf Price on
Beer & Liquor 7-10 pm
Jay- 154 Hot Dogs
2-5 p.m.-(while they last)
310 Maynard St.
S: 1 PM-2 AM,' FRI. 11:30 AM-2 AM,
SAT. 11 AM-2 AM

it f
MOO ,i
.. ..
"INDIO
'"::F'"!iff::1
caw ME
ONION
..t'
-. no
too
:4,vy

By STEVE HOOK
"They come here to raise hell."
Tommy Mercer, tourist manager of the
Chamber of Commerce in Fort Lauder-
dale, Florida, summed up the seasonal
migration of college students to this, on-
ce tranquil oceanside town; "It's a
place to go and have a good time."
For the over 140,000 college students

that converge on Fort Lauderdale bet-
ween Valentine's Day and Easter each
year (including a "tremendous
amount" of Wolverines, according to
Mercer), this is a well deserved chance
to hang loose from the obligations of
academic life, and the best place in the
country to do it. For the local in-
nkeepers, bar-owners, and other
retailers in the area, the students bring

Summer Sitations Available
Wanted mature men and women to form meaningful
relationships with children. Must have ability to commu-
nicate. Also have high energy level, commitment to out-
doors, ability to live without twentieth-century electronic
gizmos and like chicken on Friday night. Compensations:
$700-$1,000 for ten weeks plus an unforgettable experience.
INTERVIEWING MARCH 14, SUMMER PLACEMENT OFFICE.
CALL 763-4117 FOR APPOINTMENT.
FRESH AIR SOCIETY-CAMP TAMARACK, 6600 W. Maple
Rd., W. Bloomfield, Mi. 48033. We are an equal opportunity
employer with many years experience of trying to do good.

Fort Laud
a combination of headaches, long
hours, and, most importantly, big
money. According to Mercer's com-
puterized estimates, the students leave
nearly $50 million before they head nor-
th.
IN THE HEART of the "strip" (State
Highway AA), the Holiday Inn Ocean-
side is a prime example of Fort
Lauderdale's attraction to students.
Although room fees jump from $22 to
$55 in theawinter, the hotel's 223 rooms
are full through April. And, according
to spokerperson Patty Schultheis,
"They're all students."
"We cater to them," she explained.
"It's not the time of year to cater to
families, we send them elsewhere."
Asked whether the hotel is prepared for
the onslaught, Schultheis replied
calmly, "We know what to expect."
Downstairs in "The Button," a night-
club which happens to be one of the
strip's hotspots (and was recently
featured in the Detroit Free Press), the
chaos seems just as casually accepted.
"WE GO OUT of our way to see that
the kids have a party," said "Crazy"
Greg Newell, owner/manager of The.
Button. "It puts us into a hell of a lot of
work though. Our employees are on
their knees most of the time." ,
Referring to a recent incident, when a
barrel full of empty beer cans was em-

erdale

ptied onto a downward escalator next to
The Button, Newell sighed and said,
"We've got to expect things like that.
Things like that will happen. You can't
get all that upset. Students will be
students."
As well as being great fun, there is a
financial motive in all the Button's
madness, according to Newell, as well
as the other spots up and down the strip.
"Sure we have a financial motivation,
but not strictly. Other places are in it
strictly for the money.'' He added,
however, "College students are not
dumb.. They can tell if they're being
taken."
OFFICER DIANA Cipriani, of the
Fort Lauderdale Police Department,
said the strategy is "mainly crowd con-
trol. It's jam-packed-you can't drive
any place and it's difficult to walk."
Admitting that there is a more substan-
tial police force on the strip during
college spring-break time, Cipriani said
she believed the situation is under con-
trol. "The kids aren't that much of a
problem. The drunks are arrested and
there's no more sweat. Although-a lot of
property is destroyed, most offenses
are for sleeping or drinking publicly."
Cipriani added that "We (the police)
like it better when there aren't so many
people here. You wouldn't recognize
this place the rest of the year."

+J/r !f k ::PA.?#" /Y,;i;3.:...rti :../..::f.'rf.f :-.£two:'1/ .t.::a.r.r ..r$.i:fYfr.t "r.',.?1..;::::.:%%!'/:'r."+ J Yrrrr:Ctfr. ra.:".:::r.:: .t?- :" .. r <$rrk :;:z"'; :

SAY BULL!
TOYOUR STUDENT
£ s
t
(F7
Al
(Iy

While we were out ..,.

OF

BODY.
... 4. x
.s. . 5

(Continued from Page 1)
Rinke, who was among 35 people from
the University who went to Washington
to speak to senators and congressmen
about restoring the funds which had
been approved for the 1980 school year.
Congressman Harley Staggers of
West Virginia proposed the amendment
on the House floor last Tuesday that
would completely put back all the rest

of the money left outstanding from the
February 22 figures: $6 million for ad-
vanced nurses' training, $61 million
for traineeships, $647,000 for nursing
fellowships, and $3.9 million for resear-
ch.
YESTERDAY THE Senate Ap-
propriations Committee made recom-
mendations for total cuts ofa bout $16
See WHILE, Page 5

7,,

MEM

f

t

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