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February 17, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IFYU SEE N165 AVPEN CAtL.L 6-AJ
Wearin' o the green
Do not lose heart, 0 leprechauns of Ann Arbor. With St. Patrick's
Day a mere month away, plans for the First Annual Ann Arbor St.
Patrick's Day Parade are well on their magical way: The committee
delegates have a meeting slated for Tuesday evening with the Irish
Club of Ann Arbor to elicit support for the gala celebration. So get star-
ted with your floats, bands and costumes now so you won't be left blue
on the day o' green. For further information, call Brian at 668-8031.
Correction
In an article about 76-GUIDE in Thursday's paper, we incorrectly
stated that GUIDE staffers can tell callers what movies are playing on
campus. GUIDE operators have now informed us that they usually
refer such inquiries to the University operators.
x0
Food for thought.
Ann Arbor's People's Food Co-op is soliciting new members.
Beginning tomorrow, the non-profit co-op will open its doors to all in-
terested persons. The co-op will also hold regular orientation hours
next week. For further information, call 761-8173.
Take Ten -
On Feb. 17, 1968, the Literary College's (LSA) Curriculum Com-
mittee recommended that the faculty abolish all academic credit for
courses in the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC). The commit-
tee's recommendation blasted the reading materials in some ROTC
courses as "conjectural, non-analytical, cheaply motalistic, and often
blatantly propagandistic." Eventually, ROTC course credit was
abolished from all LSA courses.

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, February 17, 1979-Page 3
WORKERS GET COMPANY CONTROL
Bullard proposes job bill

By MARY FAR'ANSKI
Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor),
chairman of the House Labor Commit-
tee, has introduced legislation that
"will make possible the saving of jobs
in many communities where companies
have decided to move elsewhere."
The legislation, introduced in the
House earlier this week, would allow
employees of "run-away" plants, with
the help of their community, corporate
officials, union representatives, and the
Labor Department, to incorporate and
take over the plant. The bill would
mandate the Department of Labor to
set up a "Program of Assistance to
Worker Owned Corporations' to aid
employees in locating funds in order to.
keep the plant, and thus their jobs, in
Michigan. The Labor Department
would also help the employees with
management training and other
assistance that may be needed.

THE LEGISLATION is the first of its
kind in the country to be seriously con-
sidered, a state official said. Bullard is
expected to discuss the proposed bill
with the House Labor Committee soon.
An "employee-owned corporation,"
according to the bill, is a. business
operation and the management rights
are represented by voting stock which
may be owned only by the employees of
the operation. Fifty per cent of the
stock must be owned by the employees.
Bullard said between 1967 and 1974,
some 200,000 jobs were lost in Michigan
due to the closing of some 4,000 plants.
However, many jobs have been saved
in Michigan, Indiana, and Vemont
because of employee takeover of "run-
away" plants. Amercel, formerly the
Mississippi Structural Steel Company,
located in the Lansing area, has been
taken over and is operated by its 160
employees soon after the steel company
moved elsewhere.

Many plants have closed down or
moved out of state for several reasons:
retirement by the owners, takeover by
a conglomerate, relocation of
production in another state to
maximize profits, and closure because
of anti-pollution regulations.
The bill will contain a "sunset
clause" because this is a trial approach
to saving jobs. At three and one-half
years after the bill's passage, the Labor
Department will hold hearings to
evaluate activities under the bill and to
suggest continuation, modification, or
termination of the bill.

.j

#e
~C
feb.16 & 17 8pm
Slauson School
1019 W. Washington
Tickets: 665-5129
also at the door

Do a Tree a Favor:
Recycle Your Daifly

'V q

Anti-nuke group gets
Markley Council money

LINA WERTMULLER'S

1977

SOME OF THE MUPPETS were at a loss for words when they heard
about the $370,000 lawsuit.
Kermit gets slapped
Kermit the Frog and the rest of the Muppet gang have been slap-
ped with a $370,000 lawsuit. Two Illinois manufacturers filed the suit
Thursday in a U.S: District Court in Manhattan, New York. The plain-'
tiffs, Ronald and Alfred Falese, and Gem-Dandy Inc., of Madison,
N.C., charged the Muppets Inc., and Children's Television Workshop
of withdrawing an offer to use the characters on a line of children's
belts. Both manufacturers said they lost sizable amounts of money in
promotional efforts as a result of the Muppets' change of heart. Ker-
mit or Miss Piggy were not available for comment.
Happenings

FILMS
Cinema Guild - Wertmuller's Night Full of Rain, 7, 9:15 p.m.,
MLB, Aud. 3.
Cinema II - Warhol's Chelsea Girls, 7 p.m. only, Angell Hall,
AudA.
Film Festival - The Ninth Annual Ann Arbor 8mm Film Festival,
2, 7, 9 p.m., Schorling Aud., School of Education.
Mediatrics - Close" Encounters of the Third Kind, 6:30, 9, 11:30
p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Barrister's Society - Bel Ami, 6, 8, 10 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
Markley Council -,Phantom of the Opera, 10 p.m., Markley Hall.
Markley Council - Hunchback of Notre Dame, 8 p.m., Markley
Hall.
East Quad Midnight Cinema Production -O Lucky Man - 9 p.m.,
midnight, R. C. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
PTP/Russian Festival - Gogol's The Inspector General, 8 p.m.,.
Power Center.
Canterbury Loft - Beckett's Ends and Odds and Fizzles, 8 p.m.,
332 S. State.
Chamber Orchestra Society - The Romantics and Beyond, 8:30
p.m., Vandenberg Room, Michigan League.
Musical Society -Andres Segovia, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Ark - Rosalie Sorrels, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Choral Music - Camerata Temporanea, 4 p.m., Holy Trinity
Chapel, Forrest and Perrin Streets, Eastern Michigan University.
Coffee House - The Night of the Seventeenth, sponsored by the
Friends of the Hebrew Day School of Ann Arbor, 9 p.m., Hillel Social
Hall, 1429 Hill St., $5 per person, or $2.50 late special after 10:30 p.m.
Percussion Recital, John Bannon, 2 p.m., Recital Hall, School of
Music.
Voice Recital - John Dalke, bass, 4 p.m., Recital Hall, School of
Music.
Piano Recital - Kwi-Hyun Kim, 6 p.m., Recital Hall, School of
Music.
Cello Recital - Cynthia Bloom, 8 p.m., Recital Hall, School of
Music.-
SPORTS
Women's Synchronized Swimming - Michigan Invitational,
Figure, 9 a.m., Routines, 1p.m., Bell Pool.
Women's Basketball - U-M vs. Michigan State, 2 p.m., Crisler.
Hockey - U-M vs. Wisconsin, 7:30 p.m., Yost Arena.
MISCELLANEOUS
Canterbury Loft - Workshop in mime, movement and im-
provisational theater, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call 994-4693 for infor-
mation and registration
Women and Science Workshop - Three speakers and discussion
groups in Biology, Chemistry, Math, Computer Science, 10 a.m., 296
Dennison (P and A Building).
Victory Dance - Fund raiser for Margarth Miller, 9 p.m., 150
Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw, $5 donation.
Blood Pressure Clinic - Michigan Heart Information Center, 9
a.m. to noon, 3800 Packard Rd.
Black Law Students Alliance - Midwest Regional Conference,
Workshop: Summing .Up to Move Forward - Black Leadership in the
80's, 10 a.m., Workshop: Affirmative Action, 1:30 p.m., Pre-Law Con-
ference 1:30 p.m., Finals of Moot Court Competition, 3:45 p.m., Law
School. Banquet and Dance, 7 p.m., Michigan Union.

By JOHN GOYER
Markley Hall Council passed by one
vote Thursday night a proposal to give
Council funds to the Detroit Edison
Shareholders Initiative, a campus
political group ,that opposes nuclear
power plant construction in-state.
The Shareholders Initiative is com-
posed mainly of students who own stock
in Detroit Edison. They plan to use the
Council funds for a campaign to stop
Detroit Edison from continuing the
construction of the Femi II nuclear
power plant in Monroe, Mich.'
ACCORDING to Shareholders
Initiative member Bob Jordan, a
Literary College freshman who asked
the dorm Council to donate $50, the
organization will also ask for funds
from Mosher-Jordan and South Quad
dorm councils at their next meetings.
Earlier this week, however, both
Couzens and Alice Lloyd Councils post-
poned voting the funding request.
According to Couzens Council
president Pat Singer, Couzens put off a
vote on the fund request until next week
because the discussion at last Sunday's
meeting became too "heated." Couzens
resident Karen Engram said Jordan
presented his proposal poorly. "He just
asked for the money," said Engram.
Singer said Jordan's request took
about half an hour to present. At- the
Markley meeting Thursday, where the
resolution to donate funds passed, Jor-
dan spoke for only a few minutes before
asking for a vote. Markley president
Dan Lettvin said after the meeting, "If
he'd made it longer here, I'm not sure
that it would've passed."
JORDAN SAID that when he spoke at
the Couzens Hall meeting, students
raised questions about the issue, and
Daily
Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1979
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 73-4117
Menasha, Otsego, Mi. Opening for engineering
students in elec. and mech. fields. Position location is
north of Kalamazoo. Further details available.
INTERVIEWS:
Camp Maplehurst, Mi. Coed. Will interview Mon.
Feb 19 from 1 to 5. Openings include waterfront
(WS1), arts, crafts, nature, sports, and many others.
Register by phone or in person.
Camp Tanuga, Mi. Coed. Will interview Weds.
Feb. 21 from ito 5. Openings-waterfront (WS), ar-
ts/crafts, sailing, tennis, nurse and cook. Register by
phone or in person.
National Music Camp, Interlochen, Mi. Will inter-
view Thurs. Feb. 22 from 9 to 5. Openings-need staff
with recreational background, instrumental music
people, waterfront (WSI), arts/crafts, stage crew,
and food maintenance. Register by phone or in per-
son.
Camp Sea Gull, Mi. Coed. Will interview Friday,
Feb. 23 from 1 to 5. All staff positions open at this
time. Register by phone or in person.
Camp Sequoia, New York, Coed, will interview
Mon. Feb. 26 from 9 to 5. Openir , include arts/craf-
ts, drama, riding instr., (Engl), athletics, and
others. Register by phone or in person.
MANN THEATRE
mxVLLGET '
MAPE VILAGE SOPPING CNE
Starts Friday, February 23rd
"THE DEERHUNTER"
Starring ROBERT DENIRO
[PjGJnitedAtsts j
Showtimes
MON.-FRI. SAT. & SUN.
Ends Thursday, 3:590
February 22nd
YOU'L L BELIEVE
A MAN CAN FL Y

many said they did not have enough in-
formation to vote.
Jordan said that students wanted to
see the other side of the nuclear power
issue presented. He added that some
students thought the money should be
for parties, not for political in-
volvement, and said he was pretty
shocked that students atCouzens didn't
want to get involved.
"I think the issue is whether we deal
with it at all," said Mark Halliday, a
Couzens council representative.
Halliday said most students are not in-
formed about the issue, and those that
were informed are about evenly divided
for and against nuclear power plants.
"IF YOU.OPEN up the dorm gover-
nment to political questions, you are
kind of opening a Pandora's box," said
Halliday. Halliday said the dorm coun-
cil has to limit itself to questions direc-
tly concerning the dorm.
Ray Kahn, Markley vice president,
said he was glad Jordan came to talk to
the Council. "Students tend to be ex-
tremely apathetic," he said. Markley
president Lettvin added, "Believe it or
not, the students were interested in it.I
just don't think they were up for a long
Zaher Mansour, another Couzens
resident, said that it is not an issue
dorm councils should contribute to, sin-
ce student opinion, on. nuclear power:.
plants is divided. "It's too touchy an;,
issue," he said.
Joel Treuhaft, Alice Lloyd Council
president, said Alice Lloyd tabled the
request because of Council policy to not
vote on new business.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00--9:

*
The Ann Arbor Filmooperative presents at MLB 3
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17
WOMEN IN LOVE
(Ken Russell, 1970), 7 & 9:15-MLB 3
A masterful adaptation of the D.H. Lawrence novel, and an encyclopedia of
filmmaking technique. Russell is restrained and brilliant in his most consistent
and intelligent film. "It is difficult to recall another film that has so success-
fully recreated the past with a depth that brings to life every snapshot we
have seen of the time."-Judith Crist. Stars GLENDA JACKSON in an Oscar-
winning role; ALAN BATES, OLIVER REED, JENNIE LINDEN.
Sunday: Winner's Night-Ann Arbor 8mm Film Festival
Monday: MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE & THE GHOUL &
CURSE OF THE DEMON

NIGHT .FULL OF RAIN
In Wertmuller's first film in English, CANDICE BERGEN gives what may be
her best performance as an American photographer who marries an Ital an
communist-journalist. GIANCARLO GIANNINI is the journalist, who ten years
later has had enough of her and the party. Romantic comedy with plenty
of verbal abuse. By the director of Swept Away among others.
Sun: Richardson's TOM JONES
Mon: IVAN THE TERRIBLE PART I (free)

Announcing a
TRAVEL SEMINAR
TO APPALACHIA
" MARCH 3-11, 1979
" For foreign and American students L holars
" PURPOSE:
-To learn about the culture, problems and history of Appa-
lachia
-To mutually share ideas and values, music and dance
-To visit the Great Smoky Mountain National Park and sur-
rounding scenic areas
" COST: $100 (covers food, transportation, and lodging),
Contact the
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 Church
662-5529 (weekdays)
665-6575 (evenings & weekends)

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 116
Saturday, February 17, 1979
is edited-and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbr.

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

When in Southern California visit UNIVERSAL STUDIOS TOUR
"'SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR': SAME LAUGHS ANY YEAR!
A sharp and amusing entertainment, with a tear or two lurking
just beyond the laughs." - Charles Champlin, L.A. Times
"'Same Time Next Year' belongs to the Neil Simon school of play
writing. But it's more racy, penetrating and touching...the
characters never lose their humanity." - Stephen Farber, New West Magazine

"A warm and charming story.
Alda and Burstyn make an
excellent team."- Regis Philbin, KABC-TV
"Goodness laced with
laughter is what 'Same
Time, Next Year' is filled
with. - Gene Shalit, NBC-TV
The Miisch Corporation presents
Ellen Ada
Burstyn AlanJ

4

same 4dme, Next iear
ELLEN BURSTYN and ALAN ALDA in"SAME TIME,NEXT YEAR"
a. A Walter Mirisch/Robert Mulligan Production
Screenplay by BERNARD SLADE - Based on-the stage play by BERNARD SLADE
Produced on the stage by MORTON GOTTLIEB - Music by MARVIN HAMLISCH
Produced by WALTER MIRISCH and MORTON GOTTLIEB - Directed by ROBERT MULLIGAN
A (UniveprsalPictur Ti irlr , R)Nnw a n t!t RI

II

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