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February 15, 1979 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-15

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 15, 1979-Page 7

Ayers mixes funk with fun

i

By MATTHEW KOPKA
"Y'all don't get music around here
very often, do you?" said Roy Ayers
Tuesday night to his largely black
audience at the Second Chance. The
popular vibraphonist and singer was
obviously referring to the scarcity of
black popular music on the Ann Arbor
campus and the crowd responded with
knowing cheers.
After having warmed the already ex-
cited audience up with his "I Want to
Touch You," which included a short,
funny rap about touching and some
multi-lingual antics by his musicians,
Ayers sang his substantially
rearranged version of Sam Cooke's
"You Send Me," the title and hit from
his latest Polydor album. The crowd
obviously liked the man and knew his
music well, adding the voices to the
chorus at Ayers' encouragement. They
also scatted along with him while he
sang and played.
THE VIBES are a'pleasing, soothing
instrument, with their bell-like tones
and soft, seductive sound. Ayers has
taken them out of their more frequen-
tly-used jazz and put them into his more
popularly-geared music. He obviously
plays them well, but used them only
sparingly Tuesday night.'
The short, jazzy flurries which he did
play, sometimes with one mallet in
The Clash
take overr
Cle velan d
ballroom
(Continued from Page 6)
One of their first great songs,
"White Riot," performed Tuesday
night as an encore sums up their poli-
tical stance well:
All the power is in the hands
Of people rich enough to buy it,
While we walk the streets
Too chicken to even try it,
And everybody does what they're
told to,
And everybody eats supermarket
soul-food.
White riot, I wann riot.
White riot-a riot of my own I
THE BAND PLAYED most of their
best material, including "Janie Jones,"
their best pop song: "Hate & War,"
"What's My Name," and "London's
Burning," three explosive tracks from
their first LP, The Clash, which was
foolishly never released in America;
"Safe European Home," "English Civil
War," "Tommy Gun," and "Guns On
The Roof," their four most overtly
political songs from their second
album, Give 'Em Enough Rope; and
"Jail Guitar Doors," "Clash City
Rockers," "Complete Control," "City
of the Dead," and "(White Man) in
Hammersmith Palais," superb songs
available only as singles.
It was a memorable show, alive with
the soulful beat of revolution. (It's no
accident that The Clash performed a
rock'n'roll version of the reggae tune
"Police & Thieves," or that so many of
their songs are underscored by reggae
rhythms.)
My friend Tom captured the
evening's spirit when he said later:
"This was one of the best rock'n'roll
concerts I've ever seen. We got one of
Mick Jones' guitar picks and smoked a
joint in the front row, so I consider
myself fulfilled." Tom will be going to
law school next year.

FETUS MONITORED
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP)-Doctors
at the Yale Medical Center are working.
on a procedure which, they believe, can
detect heart defects in the fetus.
They are using ultrasound to search
for congenital defects in the unborn in-
fants of women who have been iden-
tified as being in possible danger of
having a child with a defect, said Dr.
Charles Kleinman, a pediatric car-
diologist.
Ultrasound,4similar in principle to
sona,, is widely used as a diagnostic
tool because it does not require the in-
sertion of anything into the body.
According to Kleinman, doctors can
get acceptable images in well over one-
half of their cases. He said they were
usually able to identify the two cham-
bers of the heart, the presence of valves
and get some idea of the size and ef-
ficiency of the heart.
The procedure, known as "echo car-
diography," is still in its infancy, he
said.

each hand, sometimes with two, were
quite appealing; and somewhat
reminiscent of vibist Milt Jackson's.
Though Ayers didn't play much, he
dominated the show from start to
finish, constantly speaking in an
idealistic and often esoteric manner,
exhorting the audience to become,
peaceable people, to "stop killing one
another", and to "check out the mind
before you check out the behind." Both
statements elicited appreciation from
the audience.

AYERS SHARED the center stage
and singing with Kathleen Jackson, a
talented and very pretty singer. It was
her first night with the subsumed in
synthesizers and slick production.
It brought a lot of folks down on-
to the dance floor. The band and Ayers
had hit their stride, and a gutsy double
funk at a medium tempo followed,
filling the floor to bursting and causing
some mean dancing.
THE NEXT song, played after Ayers
caught his breath, was also excellent. It

had a short, distinctive break that left
you hanging and then dropped you into
its chorus right on the beat. It moved
even those who were still in theiFr seats.
The guitarist, Chuck Anthony, picked
out an expellent solo in this and the next
number, playing in a screeching
rhythm and blues vein.
This proved to be the most musically
exciting part. of the evening. Ayers
played with combinations of his
musicians, calling on the conga player
(Chano 'O'Fererral) and Anthony, and
then on the drummer and keyboard
player (Gene Dunlap and Harold Land)
for some fairly inspired jamming. This
was the biggest chance most of the
band members got to show off, the set
obviously being designed to highlight
Ayers and his hits. The too-short per-
formance closed with another "You
Send Me," Kathleen doing some Min-
nehaha near-yodels and warbling and
complementing Ayers' singing more
securely than the first time around. As
she soloed Ayers excited the audience
by miming a conversation with them,
arguing and gesticulating, checking his
new female vocalist out, and fixing
everyone with an evil-eye.
After standing outside for fifteen or
twenty minutes past the 10:30 showtime
waiting for the first show to end, and
having to wait another good half-hour
for the second show to commence, the
crowd was very patient, and used the
opportunity to socialize.
There were some excellent outfits in
attendance. I saw one woman with a
long black cape, beautiful leather boots
and an exquisite woven-gold skullcap
that had flaps over the ears and a sort
of bun on the top. A number of men,
one of, whom was a particularly good
dancer, wore baggy wool pants, bggy
white dress -shits with small round
collars and a thin tie.
The audience nearly stole the show,
and for $6.50 a person to get in theddor,
perhaps they should have.
DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING FOR
MEN AND WOMEN
Try a 1979 NEW LONG or SHORT STYLE
THE DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Arborland .a.....971-9975
Maple VilIag-.. ... 761-2733
Liberty off State .....668-9329
East U. at So. U.......662-0354

M-

L

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup and Sandwiches-75C
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16
NANCY FREDMAN
Counselor-Case Manager at "Safe House":
"DOMES TIC VIOLENCE:
IS MARRIAGE A LICENSE FOR ABUSE?"
GUILD HOUSE-so2Monroe

Mediatrics presents:
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD WORLD
(Steven Spielberg) First time on campus. A global search for answers to the
mysteries of unidentified flying objects which have fueled one of the most
intriguing controversies of our time. This magnificent presentation of the
concept of extra-terrestrial visitors creates a truly unique experience in
motion picture entertainment. It brings you as close as possible to an event
that could be the most momentous of our time-the exerience of contact
with alien beings. With RICHARD DREYFUSS.
Friday, Feb. 16 Nat Sci Aud 6:30, 900, 11:30
Saturday, Feb. 17 admission $150
(Thursday's film is cancelled)

FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT'S 1959
THE 400 BLOWS
Truffaut was the enfant terrible of French film criticism before
he made this fim on a "can you do it better" dare. The unex-
pectedhresult was the praise of former targets of Truffaut's
pen. The sometimes humorous story of a neglected adoles-
cent, this is also the autobiography of two other young men-
JEAN-PIERRE LEAUD and TRUFFAUT himself.
FRI: Fellini's AMARCORD
SAT: Wertmuller's NIGHT FULL OF RAM

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

CINEMAGUIL.

M

i

I'

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT"
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FRPRICE OF ONE

ADULTS FRI., SAT..-SUN.
EVE. t HOLIDAYS .S.ll
MON.-THURS. EVE. 53.00
ALL MATINEES $52.50
CHILD TO 14$.34

..J

CHILD TO 14 $1.58

I

r

STATE FRI. & SAT. LATE SHOW
TH EA TRE All~Oilot #fWOK"

I.THEATRE American Hot Wax"I

MON., TUES., THURS., FRI.
7:00 & 9:25
SAT., SUN., WED. 11:00-4:00-7:00-9:25

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F

OF

66

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UiyPhotoODy MAURtEr'MAJLLEY
Putting on Ayers
Kathleen Jackson (above), vocally accompanied Roy Ayers during Ayers'
show Monday night at Second Chance. Ayers (below), entertained the
audience by singing, playing vibes, and offering a series of good-natured
admonishments.
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents in Aud. A:
Thursday, February 15
WIZARDS
(Ralph Bakshi, 1977) 7 & 10:20-AUD. A
Bakshi got the go-aheasI to do LORD OF THE RINGS on the basis of this fantasy
set in the distant future. Wizard brothers battle each other to the death, with
Nazi-like technology up against magic and faith. Remarkable animation-
Disney pales by comparison. Featuring the voice of Mark (STAR WARS) Hamill.
FANTASTIC PLANET
(Rene Laloux, 1973) 8:40 only-AUD. A
This widely-acclaimed animated film pre-dates WIZARDS as an epic fantasy of
the struggle between good and evil. For from Earth, two races have evolved:
the giant, super-mental Draags, and the tiny, primitive Oms. Surrealistic
sci-fi-with a high-adventure musical score. "You'll think about it for a long
time after you have seen it."-NBC-TV. In French, with subtitles.
TOMORROW: THE BANK DICK, CHAPLIN SHORTS, and
NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK
Plus: THE ANN ARBOR 8MM FILM FESTIVAL
Public Lecture
On
Thursday, February 22, 1979
2225 Angell Hall-4:00-5:15

1 r.m r ,I 4
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2roo M
_Al, Ak v 1 ~UMMER u
Cand relax for the Summer UBLET
S Sublet ina modern houseUPL M NI
Vpp MAY thru AUG. P LE N
At1j)2 single rooms availabl
AOD in our 6 Bedroom house
1UFR "5min. from campus & Arb
' Block from Central Rec.
C FULLY FURNISHED I
with*Wsher/Dryer &
DishwIsher
BACKYARD
has a vegetable
"'SUNNY FRONT PORCHn p
I PriceNegtiabl C
-CallCheryl or Bruce
iI
1 1
1 1
NAME ____
1 ADDRESS -
PHNE(Actual size of ad)
PHONE1
I Please print or type legibly in the
Cost: ONLY $8.00 before ac the copy to appear. I
I 5:00P.M. March 2, 1979 I
(March 3-Mnrch 19.es ti slen n

One of the
WArlric Tan Mnct

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