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February 15, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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W'age b--Thu'rsday, February 15, 1979-The Michigan Doily
POETRY READING with
D. Clinton
and
Ken Mikolowski
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
Thursday, Feb. 15--7:30 p.m.
GUILD HOUSE Admission
602 Monroe FREE

By MIKE TAYLOR
Special to the Daily

CLEVELAND-Out of the smokey depths of the
Agora Ballroom rose a roaring sound-the sound of
rock'n'roll future. I heard it. We all heard it. For
hundreds of raving fans, many of them as fanatical
as the band, Tuesday night meant The Clash, and
The Clash meant something close to ecstacy.
"If you had virginity," one man who called him-
self Abbie Hoffman said to his female companion
after the show ended, "you could consider it lost."
He went on: "I wouldn't have been closer to
Strummer if I had been fucking him. I wouldn't
have been closer to them (referring to the crowd,
which was so thick you didn't have to do anything to
stand up) if I had been fucking them."
THE SHOW, which was a benefit for a Vietnam
vet who lost his legs in'the war, opened with local
folksinger Alex Bevan. But since the road from Ann
Arbor to Cleveland contained just a few too many
possibilities for wrong turns, we got to the Agora
just after his set ended.
Bo Diddley, a legend if I eve' saw or heard one,
ambled onto the stage a few minutes later. After
much tuning, he broke into the riff that spawned
countless rock'n'roll songs-"Not Fade Away,"

"Ride IJosephine,"
"Mocklnkd,"and "Mona,"
song that 'de his name famou
DiddleYet showed that a n
rock with 'nsiderable ease.
guitar, he ' yed "MannishI
which was flip-side of "B
came out 23,ars ago, some s
dley, (or couI) and "Road Ru
BUT THE bOWD wasn't bi
the crowd in sjIl circles, remi
scene; the resoo without m
man in red slat and a .black
kind of relic fi'the past they
be bothered witi
Folks were itcig for The C
ignored the EngI. DJ who spu
singles from Britt during the
press closer to the~ge, waitin,
arrive.
At exactly 11 :20,,, minutes
ced schedule, the T turned
lights dimmed, anibhe Clash
surged forward in 4cipation
sway back and forthor danc
to the merry beat of ,n So Boi

She's the One,"
'not to mention the
is, "Bo Diddley."
nan in his fifties can
P laying a square
Boy (I'm a Man),"
W Diddley" when. it
slow blues, "Bo Did-

Clash take complete control in Cleveland

I WAS ABSOLUTELY stunned. The three leaders
of 'the band-lead singer and guitarist Joe Strum-
mer, singer and lead guitarist Mick Jones, and
bassist Paul Simonon-were decked-out in black
pants and matching shirts. Each one wore a dif-
ferent color and each had a different stage per-
sonality. Strummer, wearing yellow, caught me fir-
st, with his bitter, menacing vocals land rabid eyes. I

",What is a UREA KASTIBAGEL ?"
(besides fresh and mode before you)

"Afresh scrambled egg with your
your choice of salami, cheese, ham, or
lox all held together by one of
our-beautiful bagels"

Portillo challenges

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Available
all-day
from .89

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We're fast,
no waiting

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THyE BAGEL FA T R ,1306 S. Unweruil
Don't forget . . FREE COFFEE with any Breakfast Bagel
(OFFER GOOD UNTIL MARCH 1)
The Writers-in-Residence Program at the Residential
College presents a reading by:
Jearome vARothenberg
Noted Poet, Anthropologist and Editor
Author of: A SENECA JOURNAL
POLAND 1931
Tusdy~Februaiy toth-8 Pm
Tuendy zinger Libral-East Quad
(East University between Hill & Willard)
--The Public is. cordially invited
A Reception will follow the reading
Jerome Rothenberg will also be the guest at
THE HOPWOOD TEA
Thursday, February 22, 3-4:30 pm
The Hopwood Room,' 1006 Angell Hall
The Writers-in-Residence Program at the Residential College is
made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment
for the Arts.

U.S. to revs
MEXICO CITY (AP) - President
Carter was challenged yesterday by
Mexican President Jose Lopez Portillo
to abandon the United States' big
brother view of Mexico and establish a
relationship based on equality.
The Mexican president, publicly ad-
monishing the United States to revise
its Mexican policies, told Carter:
"OUR PEOPLES want definitive
agreements, not circumstantial , con-
cessions."
Lopez Portillo's comments, during a
toast at a state luncheon honoring Car-
ter, were the first demonstration during
the start of Carter's 48-hour visit that
THE A Play by
HE Nikolai Gogol
INSPECTOR
GENEPAL
Featuring
Philip LeStrange
as the Mayor
Wed.-Sat., Feb. 14-17. 8 PM
Sun., Feb18, 2 PM

ise policy
the U.S. energy shortage and Mexico's
newfound energy wealth have troubled
U.S.-Mexican relations.
Carter was greeted on his arrival
here by 5,000 flag-waving Mexicans.
Speaking first in Spanish, then in
English, he said his visit offered a
chance to resolve differences "in a
spirit of peace, friendship, and mutual
respect, We have a great deal° to ac-
complish."
BUT THE airport reception, under
overcast smoggy skies and with the
temperature hovering around 70
degrees, was considered cool by Latin
American standards.
Almost, immediately after the
ceremonies, Carter and Lopez Portillo
met for 90 minutes at the National
Palace. The U.S. President then toured
the ruins of an Aztec temple and atten-
ded the luncheon.
There, he said the United States
recognizes that Mexico's independent
voice is heard "with increasing
strength and persuasiveness." He con-
ceded that the two countries sometimes
view each other with "a lack of under-
standing."
LOPEZ PORTILLO chided the
United States for "still . .. redefining
its policies" toward Mexico, and stated
that differences between the two
nations can be viewed "as a problem"
or "as a conflict."
Referring to his nation's oil and
natural gas supplies, Lopez Portillo.
said, "Mexico has.. suddenly found
itself the center of American attention
-attention that is a surprising mixture
of interest, disdain and fear, much like
the recurring vague fears you your-
selves inspire in certain areas of our
national subconscious."
The Mexican leader challenged Car-
ter to deal with the problems of the two
nations "by keeping insensitivity, am-
bition, fear or , self-seeking
manipulation from casting a shadow on,

inner." could not take my eyes of of him.
guying it. Half sat on I caught my breath and noticed the other band
inding me of a picnic members just as "Drug-Stabbing Time" was
loving, gaping at this beginning. Mick Jones, wearing blue, was more
sequin shirt as some lively and carefree than Strummer-he seemed to
really didn't want to enjoy his playing without being obsessed by it.
Looking a tad like a young Bruce Springsteen, he
'lash, so they lrgely tore about the stage, working his guitar for all that
in current New Wave it was forth, and haing a jolly time as well. Paul
ebreak. We began to Simonon, wearing red, was of the classic bass
ig for our new idols to player mold: calm, unmoving, even stoic. While his
partners rained sweat, he stayedl cool and dry.
ahead of the announ- "For those of you with the English-American dic-
off his system, the tionary back there-forget it, man," Strummer
took. the stage. We shouted. "We don't give a fuck for the words you
, and then began to know." The Clash's lyrics are sometimes hard to
ing was impossible) make out, but they're always important.
gred With the U.S.A." See THE CLASH, Page 7
P 4'..4..44~4.44U. 4~4.'44 ~ * 4' 44 ~~44. '444.
.6 :4.4AP Photo .
PRESIDEN ,y TR w4v4s'44 th crowd as4he'wlks next to4Mxican Preside
Jose. Lopez 1. 44 0 in..yesterday's ceremonies welcoming Carter4 to Mexico. .444.:44... .
a r.44a444.44. 44'4n4ed4on frien- A White House, offic..ial4sa.id\Carter
44-.'?4p ; '.." 44considered444. delaying 44.444the 444t444p4 yesterday~''4
At the airport 44444'o4y,'44oy4Scouts? morning .'as44a.result of. the armed.
andoter4.,. hilre soo 4'saut n heU.. Embassy in Iran,
maracasand.w. red, reen ad but hat potponemnt o4 he.vist woul
Mrs. Carter stepp from Air Force plicated4P." Te Pesient wa
One44at412:15 p44m.44.~a4.- walked down'4' wakened.4during4 the4early 44orning
a redcarpt. ysteray t be iformd ofthe ttac. .
ofth fgancpia. b thee, theyreportely haveplayed pmmine
communicate their '9rmands to roe in sporai 44ou'breas of isurge
authorities. cy in eastern Afghanistan against.\" th~..4~ 44. *444~ 4
pro-Soviet government of Presid44..
.'.44. 44.44.44444Noor4Mohammad Taraki,44 which seize.4
powe in'a4bloody coup.l.st4April.
Dail . dail .,.The govrnment hasbeen play
.down' 34'~ th nest fth ihigwi
.."44444.' 44Afghan.exiles4.in4.Pakist.an.say44..' 4'
14 I 64.055 hndrds f toop ad vl4ae.'.a
force strafing an napalm.atta4ks..
Kabl.Rdiosad.gvermen..
fiiasdi ter et o.re ub.utt
abductors refused and an attack wa4
or4dered..4.. . But n Wasingtn, a St..

Department spokesman sharpl
criticized the Afghans, saying they ha
ignreda U.S. appeal that the
" negotiate with the kidnappers.
. ,. _

ii

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e.1L

spt.

Tickets at the PTP Box Office
in the Michigan League
313/764.0450 & through
all Hudsorfs Stores.
The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
.Guest Artist Series 1979
Power Center- Ann Arbor
Presented as part of an
all campus Russian Arts
Festival.

U.S. offici

'U

When in Souhern California visit UNIVERSAL STUDIOS TOUR

(Continued from Page 1)
disguised as traffic police, stopped
Dubs' chauffeur-driven limousine
yesterday morning, seized him and
Receive The
Subscribe--C

r.,

"~SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR': SAME LAUGHS, ANY YEAR!
A sharp and amusing entertainment, with a tear or two lurking
just beyond the laughs." - Charles ChamplinL.A. Times
'"Same Time Next Year' belongs to the Neil Simon school of play
witing. But its more racy, penetrating and touching ...the
charaters never lose their, humanity." - Stephen Farber, New West Magazine

"A. warm and charming story.
Aida and Burstyn make an
excellent team.r- Regis Pibn ACT
"Goodness laced with
laughter is what 'Same
Time, Next Year' is tilled
with." - Gene Shalit, NBC-TV

cfl MANN THEATRES
IOV L 'WIN
MAPLE VILAGE SHOPPING CENT13R
ADMISSION o
Adut-$4.00 Chid-$2.00

--,j

The'Mirisch Corporation presents.,r
Ellen Alda r rS
Buriityn tAlan / .
"same Min,~et~ear"

DOlIT.
ANNUALLY
BUT DO IT TODAY!

*1.

tG] UnitedArbts~t
SHOWTIMES

BUY A

1979

MV.-FRI.
6:,-9:00

ELLEN B(JRSTYN and ALAN ALDA in"SAME TIMEMNEXT YEAR"
A Walter Mirisch/Robert Mulligan Production
Screenplay byBERNARD SLADE " Based on the stage play by BERNARD SLADE
Produced on the stage by MORTON GOTTLIEB " Music"by MARVIN HAMLISCH
Produced by WALTER MJRISCH and MORTON GOTTLIEB " Directed by ROBERT MULLUGAN
A Ili4UIcfl c Lturem " Tecnin~rlr Now a DL IBook

Michi anensian
Yea ok
at:

SAT. & SUN.
1:45 6:30
3:45 9:00

YOU'LL BELIEVE I

6

---t..

~\A MAN CAN FLY
yetw mIWUMta w

II

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