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February 15, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


AATA cuts service

lbw PIRGIM board

By JEFFREY WOLFF
The Ann(, Arbor Transportation
Authority (AATA) board last night
unanimously approved service cuts of
309 hours a week to take effect March
18. These cuts include the elimination of
Saturday Dial-A-Ride (DAR).
All the cutbacks are in DAR service,
dealing almost exclusively 'with
elimination or reductions of peak-hour
,service. The reduction of ┬žaturday
DAR accounts for 125of the weekly
-hour cuts. AATA Operations Assistant
Henry Bonislawski said 2,585 people
currently use DAR on an average
Saturday. Regular fixed route service
will be extended with four new lines on
Saturday, but Bonislawski admits some
of these riders will "most certainly"
stop using AATA due to long walking
distances to the fixed route bus stops.
The cutbacks on weekdays represent
an average reduction of approximately
36 hours per day. The 'cuts consist of
removing peak hour vans which arrive
at Fourth and William in the West
Summit, Burns Park, and West.
Madison zones; discontinuing one of
two Miller vans during morning peak
hours; one van on the Packard-Platt
zone during evening peak hours; and
reducing service levels on the
Veteran's Administration} Hospital
route and Pontiac zone. Bonislawski

said there are now nearly 100 people
with daily standing orders for these
routes, and many more use these routes
less frequently. AATA currently
operates 4,271 hours a week. Saturday
DAR Now runs from 8:00 a.m. until 6:15
p.m.
Board chairman Edwin Pear said
"No board member relishes the thought
of voting for service cuts but it is
something which has to be done." He
added that one advantageof the cuts
will be in "getting the house in order so
next year we will be able to set realistic
service levels."
The cuts are the result of AATA"
Learning just last month that it was not
eligible for $500,000 in federal funds,
despite previous assurances to'the con-
trary. To-meet this sudden deficit, the
Department of State Highways and
Transportation (DSHT) offered AATA
$460,000. The service cuts are intended
to eliminate the remainder of the
deficit.
The board voted last night to accept
the state offer which consists of a
$200,000 loan to be repaid with interest
and $260,000 from a recommended two-
year Demonstration and Development
Program. This $260,000, still awaiting
approval by the state legislature, was
previously intended for AATA expan-
sion.

nembers
By)N BENSCHOTER
PIRG' members elected seven
membeo the reform group's local
board ring elections this week.
Only 7IRGIM members voted in
the ellion, which had been post-
ponedr a month due to a lack of
publif
ppIM coordinator Tom Moran
saidiat PIRGIM is concerned
abothe low election turnout and
theganization is stepping up effor-
ts combine PIRGIM elections
wi Michigan Student Assembly
(1A) elections in the spring.
combined election has been held
ihe past and nearly 3,000 votes
ye recorded. This figure is still far
tow the 12,500 PIRGIM members
io are eligible to vote. MSA
rpresentatives were not available
r comment.
The seven PIRGIM members
lected this week are: Gary Claxton,
ark Klender, Marian Langelier,

elected
John Leone, Steve Michaelson, Jon
Stromsta, and Paula Waterman.
The new board is expected to act on
a proposal at their first meeting next
week which will deal with the status
of the elections. Two seats will be
open in April for positions that will
be vacated by next fall. Elections for
those positions will be in April.
PIRGIM announced that it will
have better communications with
local news agencies in an attempt to
better their public relations.
Marian Langelier, who Was elec-
ted to the board for her third term,
said she thought MSA would approve
the combined elections. She added
that if MSA does not approve the
proposal, PIRGIM elections would
be held as close as possible to the
MSA elections. She also indicated
that more polling places would be
set up, weather permitting, and if
enough people volunteer to staff
them.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 15, 1979-Page 5
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donate pIasma
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662-7744

I

GUIDE phone lines
help round-the-clock

By ROBERT FELDMAN
How long does it take to boil an egg?
What movies are playing on campus
tonight?
THESE QUESTIONS and more can
be answered by calling 76-GUIDE, or
simply GUIDE on campus phones.
However, the 24-hour GUIDE phone
line also offers counseling to callers.
Advisor Evelyn Gauthier feels too
many people think GUIDE is only for
persons with serious problems. "It
doesn't have to be a crisis to call," she
said. "We want to encourage people to
talk to GUIDE."
Since the early 1970s, GUIDE
operators have been coming up with
answers to all sorts of questions.
"Someone wanted to know what is the
gestation period for elephants,"
Gauthier said.
HOWEVER, GUIDE answers more
questions that deal with acad'emics and
_social services than with elephants.
Besides answering questions, GUIDE
operators frequently direct callers'
questions to other University and local
agencies, Gauthier said.
GUIDE's counseling function in-
cludes crisis intervention, problem
solving, and giving support. Though
there are fewer calls at night, these
night calls generally are the more
serious counselling calls for the 26
students who operate GUIDE.
GUIDE operators are backed up by
Counseling Services during the day and
a counselor on call at night, Gauthier
said.
DAYTIME GUIDE workers are
volunteers while the nighttimhe workers
are paid. GUIDE is funded through
Peer Counseling. All of the students
who work on GUIDE participate in
,other aspects of Peer Counseling, in-
WAKE
UP!
U~p1.
to
S4rb43a

cluding Outreach and assertivess
training.
GUIDE grew out of a proposal i070
by a coalition of University groate
and undergraduate psychology DIen-
ts. These students supported a tver-
sity service to deal with druglated
problems. Because of legal priems,
such as the University's liaVy for
students involved in the pposed
program, GUIDE later separAd from
Drug-Help. GUIDE stand out
primarily as an information svice but
now emphasizes counseling.
It is unusual to get a busignal at
GUIDE. However, if the li is busy,
GUIDE counselors suggest call back
quickly. Many calls are formation
calls which are usually arered swif-
tly, enabling the three GjE lines to
become free within severgfinutes.

ELECTION DIRECTORS NEEDED
To organize and operate the Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) elections of April 2-3-4.
Requires one month of preparation.
Experience helpful.
Paid position by contract.
Apply 3909 Michigan Unn, 9-5 ily
'V Deadline February 21, 1979

r

FINAL

'inter

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COATS 20

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ALL SWEATERS 25
X-COUNTRY SKI

-50 % OFF
PACKAGES

_I

4

ALL 25 % OFF
LARGE SELECTION

OF PANTS $5.99
BONNA SKIES $59.95 (reg.S 75.00)
HATS'& GLOVES 5O % OFF
r ii III III ilIII

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/*00-011 z

A
. r a
v.

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