100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Friday, January 26, 1979-The Michigan Daily

BOB RAFELSON

1970

Students call for
extended bus service

FIVE EASY PIECES
Color. JACK NICHOLSON, KAREN BLACK, SUSAN ANSPACH. An outstanding
cast with Nicholson in his first starring role, after 12 years in films. All about
rootlessness, escape from bourgeois America, and the problem of possibly
being not quite good enough. Includes the classic scene of how -to order
toast at a roadside restaurant that doesn't have toast on the menu. Short:
QUEST FOR KNOWLEDGE, Paul Tassie, 1977.
Sat: BILLY JACK
Sun: HERE COMES THE NELSONS

CINEMA GU ILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 A 9:05

OLD ARCH AUD
$1.50

(Continued from Page 1)
nothing is agreed on at this meeting,
Pace said he would meet with other
administrators to discuss funding.
CURRENT BUS service hours place
an extra burden on North Campus
residents working, studying or atten-
ding social events late at night, accor-
ding to many residents. Students also
face safety risks while walking late at
night when a bus is not available, they
claim.
Most students were enthusiastic
about the trial period last year, and
said they feel the extension of weekend
hours is especially crucial.
"I used the late buses when I stayed
late to study, but especially on weeken-
ds," said Tom DeCarlo, a Literary
College sophomore. "It's a real
problem on weekends because the
b.uses stop so early. If a bunch of friends
go to Dooley's, we have to get back
early, but when the buses ran later, we
could stay till close.
"IF YOU'RE up late doing
homework, it's great. A lot of people
used it," he added. "If you miss the
buses, you end up walking, and it's just
too far and too cold." -
This year, Pace and other MSA
members said they felt there would be a
demand for extended bus hours, and.
with the help of Ellsworth, Pace
researched the costs of running such a
service, and conducted a survey on the
buses to determine the needs for exten-
ded hours.
Out of 400 students surveyed in Oc-
tober, 79 per cent said they would use
the service. Some 40 per cent said they
would use it more than once a week.
Eighty-one per cent of the students sur-
veyed were North Campus residents.
THE MOST common reason for sup-
porting bus service was the need to
return home from Central Campus
libraries, along with Central Campus
residents returning from the North
Campus ,Computer Center and other
research facilities which stay open all
night.
Pace presented the results and
proposals for improving North Campus
transportation to' former President
Robben Fleming and other ad-

ministrators at a special MSA meeting
Oct. 26.
At the meeting, administrators and
students informally agreed to a one-
month trial period for extending bus
service.
THE RIDERSHIP results from the
trial period showed an outstanding need
for late night sevices, according to
Pace.
More than 2,000 students rode the
North Campus buses in the extended
late night hours during the test period.
MSA and transportation officials each
chipped in $900 for the trial period.
THE AVERAGE number of riders
during extended hours on Sunday was
84, Monday - 39, Tuesday - 58, Wed-
nesday - 59, Thursday - 62, Friday -
105, and Saturday - 74. There was not
one Saturday when all scheduled buses
made their runs.
Pace also calculated the average
number of riders per hour, in order to
compare the cost per rider per hour
with that of Night Owl bus service, a
University bus service which runs at
night from the Undergraduate Library
to Oxford Housing. Sunday the figures
averaged 32 per hour, Monday - 15,
Tuesday - 22, Wednesday - 23, Thur-
sday - 24, Friday - 34, and Saturday
- 24.
The cost of operating the buses was.
$15 per hour, which amounted to 50* per
ride on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday,
and 75 during the week. Night Owl
costs $1 to $1.09 per ride to operate.
WHEN STUDENTS were first housed
on North Campus, Pace said, the
University stipulated that adequate
transportation had to be provided for.
students living there. At that time, bus
routes finished at 3 a.m. on weekends,
and 1:30a.m. during the week.
In 1975, the University cut back on
bus hours, saying it was too expensive
to run.
Pace once lived at Bursley, and said
tliere was an obvious need for late bus
hours. "There is still a need for late
hours," he said. "A lot of people were
interested, and a lot rode - especially
on Sunday nights. One Sunday night, we
had 186 people use the late service."

SINGERS " DANCERS " INSTRUMENTALISTS┬░S 170-S200/week
TECHNICIANS S150-S175/week.
Seasonal Performers being auditioned for:
KINGS ISLAND, CIncInnatI, OH KINGS DOMINION, Richmond, VA
CAROWINDS, Charlotte, NC Hanna-Barbera's MARINELAND, LA, CA
Prelimiriary and Call-Back Auditions:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Student Union, Assembly Hall,
'fles., Jan. 30; 1-7 P.M.-
Round-trip airfare paid for hired performers traveling over 250 miles to work at the parks.
KINGS PRODUCTIONS, Cincinnati, OhIo 45219.

Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG-

BARBARA McCANN, .1eft, coordinator of the test anxiety program, an. Julie
Nagel, coordinator of the piano performance anxiety program, demonstrate some
of the hardware that they use to help people overcome their fears.
Prof. ofers hope to
victims oftest jtters

By VICKI HENDERSCIN
If you clam up, get the cold sweats or
hot shakes every time a prof pops a quiz
on you, you're not alone.
"High test anxiety is a characteristic
behavior of University of Michigan
students," according to Prof. James
Papsdorf. He is presently conducting a
test anxiety reduction program for

S. Korea asks North

Y

for reunification talks

I

SEOUL (Reuter) - South Korea
yesterday proposed holding a
preliminary meeting between officials
of North and South Korea before June,
either in Seoul or Pyongyang, to pave
the way for full-fledged talks on the
reunification of Korea.
Government spokesman Kim Sung-
jin said fth a statement it was hoped that
"the directly responsible authorities of
North Korea" would make a sincere
response.
KIM, WHO is Culture-Information
Minister, said the Seoul government
noted. statements broadcast by North
Korea last Tuesday and yesterday
regarding north-south dialogue.
'We assume that the North Korean
statement is an indication of its
willingness to reaffirm the spirit and
principles of the July 4, 1972 joint
statement (between the two Koreas),
and also to faithfully adhere to the
agreed provisions of the statement. . ,"
the spokesman said.
In a statement made by "Central
Committee of the Democratic Front for
the Reunification of the Fatherland" on
Tuesday, North Korea suggested
holding a joint north-south national con-
ference in early September in

Pyongyang, capital of North Korea, or
Seoul. /
IT ADDED that a preliminary
meeting should be held in early June in
Pyongyang.
Wednesday North Korea welcomed a
proposal by South Korean President
Park Chung Hee to resume their
dialogue, stalled since 1973, on
reunification.
North Korea's official daily Rodong
Sinmun described the proposal as
heralding a "new start" in relations
between the two countries, according to
the North Korean Central News Agen-
cy, monitored in Hong Kong.
Last week President Park proposed
that the two sides meet without precon-
ditions at any┬░ time and any place to
discuss reunification.
In Peking, North Korean Am-
bassador Jon Myong Su met diplomats
day before yesterday and told them
moves to resume the dialogue
originated in the north, diplomatic
sources said.
They said there were important.
changes in tone and style in the latest
North Korean statement on
reunification, which avoided any
polemical attacks on the south.

"There areside benefits
to this coping approach.
When the exam anxiety
scores come down, general
anxietv will reduce. They
will be nore relaxed
about life in general."
-Prof. James Papsdorf
on test anxiety
reducctiont
students afflicted with exam-time
panic.
RICHARD SHAPIRO, a University
grad student, started the program.
"There was a lot of interest," said Pap-
sdorf. "The program has been running
for the past four years."
"We work on the hypothesis that
physiological and emotional' respon-
sivity are functions of how a person
labels the situation. If it is threatening,
to the worth of the individual, chances

are good that a strong emotional reac
tion will insure poorer performance."
Peer pressure, fear of a loss of self-
respect or respect from family can
promote anxiety suffered before
exams," he said. "This insures the
likelihood that students won't recall an-
swers."
"WE TRY TO GET students to talk
down their anxieties,'' Papsdorf ex-
plained. "We conduct biofeedback-
assisted relaxation training and
provide exam-related imagery that will
triggeranxieties like those experienced
in an actual exam situation.
"Hand temperature frequently.
drops. Grad students working on the
program will try to get students to talk
down their anxieties or prompt respon-
ses to reduce anxiety," he said.
The program measures on a scale of
20 to 80, based on answers to a list of 20
questions. The Test Anxiety Inventory
Scale was developed by Charles
Speelburger of the University of
Florida.
RESULTS ARE abased on how often
these statements apply to the student.
"The average student scores about 39,"
said Papsdorf.
"We have had very good results," he
claimed. "A student with an anxiety
level of 55 can usually be brought
down to about 43 on the scale. It almost
inevitably works on students with good
study habits," he added.
"We get the biggest response from
second term.sophomores and first term
juniors," Papsdorf stated. "We do get
grad students, but they are not the
majority.
"THERE ARE also side benefits to
this coping approach," said Papsdorf.
"When the exam anxiety scores come
down, general anxiety will reduce.
They will be more relaxed about life in
general."
Other variations of-the program are
also being implemented at the Univer-
sity. "We are working on developing
similar programs in the Music School,
.primarily aimed at the Department of
Piano, to reduce anxiety and stress
students feel before recitals," Papsdorf
said. "These students know their
material, but are apprehensive about
reciting. There is also a program of-
fered for staff to cope with
management stress."

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS ADULTSFRI., SAT., SUN.
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT" EVE. & HOLIDAYS $3.5
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED MON.-TURS. EYE. 13.0
FOR PRICE OF ONEI CHItDT014 $1.9
WAYSIDE THEATRE "Wldrness Family
3020 Washtenaw , s F"
Phone 434-1782

i

F'

I

I

MEDIATRICS
presents
- -....

Ex-music prof dies
Theodore Heger, 70, University
professor emeritus of music, died Jan.
22 at the California Medical Ceniter in
Los Angeles. He and his wife, Dorothy
Heger were on the first stage of a
round-the-world trip when he was
stricken with a massive heart attack,
the University announced.
Heger is survived by his wife, their
two children, Theodore Charles and
Diane Virginia; and several gran-
dchildren.

r

J

i

THE NEW EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL
From avant garde to outright raunchy, including the scene that made DEEP THROAT the famous
film it is today, from animation to "porn" from the past. The NEW EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL is a
masterpiece of x-rated fun.
FRIDAY, JAN. 26 Nat Sci Aud 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30

L

i

Come browse
through our
Green House
CICIRELtI'S

-and

..

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan