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January 25, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Thursday, January 25, 1979-The Michigan Daily
AATA rejects outside control,

seeks director

By JEFFREY WOLFF
After an intense debate last night, the
Ann Arbor Transportation Authority
(AATA) board rejected a plan to con-
tract with an outside consulting firm to
run AATA.
.Instead, by a narrow 4-3 vote, the
board voted to negotiate with an
executive search company to find a
permanent executive director for
AATA.
The board rejected a resolution to
confirm Acting Director Robert Works

for a minimum period of one year.
Although there was strong support of'
Works, the majority of members ap-
parently agreed with board member
Cecil Ursprung that "we have the
obligation as a public agency to conduct
a thorough search to see who is
available."
NEVERTHELESS, all members ex-
pressed strong praise for Works. AATA
Board Chairman Edwin Pear
acknowledged that "Works has done a
superb job." The resolution, which

AATA approved stated that Works will
be a top candidate in the search.
The major opposition to hiring an
outside management firm revolved
around the issue of what board mem-
bers perceived to be a loss of local con-
trol. Several members said they agreed
with member Joel Samoff's "initial
fundamental reservation against an
outside firm, particularly here in Ann
Arbor where there is a real premium on
local management."
The other major source of opposition
was the feeling of board members that
the approximately $150,000 annual costs
for an outside firm did not justify the
benefits. These benefits were explained
by board member Joyce Chesbrough as
"the need for someone to come in with a
lot of professional knowledge and ex-
pertise.
The search for new management

began after former Director Karl
Guenther's forced resignation in early
September.
G uenther's departure was due to his
unrelenting insistence on retention and
expansion of Dial-A-Ride service
despite mounting board opposition.
At the time, the board decided its
most immediate problems following
Guenther's departure were grappling
with a budget deficit which for fiscal
year 1977-78 reached over $479,000, as
well as laying plans for cutbacks in
Dial-A-Ride.
At the time, Works, previously Guen-
ther's assistant director, was promoted
to acting director. However, it was
made clear in Works' contract that the
appointment was temporary.
The board received its introduction
to the concept of outside management
on December 6 from representatives of

one such transportation consulting
firm-ATE Management and Service
Company. ATE boasted of being "the
largest firm in the world for providing
transist management."
It presently manages 37 systems in 26
states including such
diverse cities as Minneapolis, Mobile
(Alabama), South Bend, Tucson, and
Missoula (Montanta).
Board members had talked to transit
officials from several communities
currently using ATE. They reported
practically unanimous praise for ATE's
performance.
Pear had cited ATE's "very good
track record of quality and efficient
management" as a reason to choose
ATE.
Board member Joyce Chesbrough
supported ATE, saying it could help

meet "the need to establish the sound
structure we've been struggling for sin-
ce 1973."
Young heads institute
Edwin Young, University' professor
of chemical and metallurgical
engineering, has been named chair-
man-elect for 1979 of the American In-
stitute of Chemical Engineering
(AIChE) Heat Transfer and Energy
Conversion (HTEC) Division, the
University announced. His term as
chairman begins in 1980.
As chairman-elect he also serves as
chairman of the AIChE Membership
Committee. Also, he:has been appoin-
ted as the 1979 HTEC Division liaison
with the AIChE National Public
Relations Committee.

I f -.

IRsP

International
Asian Studies Program
Full Year, Term, and Summer Programmes in
Asian Studies and Chinese Language Training
at the CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
The Program, designed for undergraduates=, graduates, researchers and scholars, allows
enrollment at the Chinese University of Hong Kong to undertake coursework or research on
traditional, modern and contemporary China and other Asian countries. A multi-
disciplinary curriculum of 12-18 courses per term are taught in English on modern and
traditional China. Mandarin and/or Cantonese language instruction available from
beginning to advanced levels as part of the IASP curriculum. Special provisions for
advanced students and post-doctoral scholars engaged in research. Also included, a varied
program of cultural activities plus travel option into China and other Asian countries.
DETAILED INFORMATION The Yale-China Association
MAY E OTAIND FOM'International Asian Studies Program
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM: 905A Yale Station
New Haven, CT 06520
Telephone : 203- 436- 442 2

Unlisted A

2

citizens

file Mich. Bell suit

YOUR MON EY
Is available from the
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA)
MSA has grants and loans available to student organi-
zations to aid in activities. Past funding has gone for
speakers, equipment and other purposes.

By United Press International
A $12 million lawsuit has been filed
against Michigan Bell Telephone Co.
for failing to keep secret names and ad-
dresses of about .450,000 persons with
unlisted telephone numbers.
The suit was filed Tuesday as a class
action suit in Washtenaw County Cir-
cuit Court on behalf of Ann Arbor attor-
ney Perry Kantner and all telephone
company subscribers who pay 75 cents
a month to keep their names, addresses
and telephone numbers out of the direc-
tory.
KANTNER'S Law partner, Martin
Smith, filed the suit after a second
suspect wastarrested in the black
market sale of the addresses of
customers with unlisted numbers.
Smith said Bell had a legal obligation
to maintain the secrecy of the names
and addresses of unlisted telephone
customers as well as their listed
telephone numbers.
A Bell spokesman, Bill Hensley,
yesterday denied Smith's charge. He
said the firm has tried to keep secret all
information but is legally bound to keep
secret only the unlisted numbers.
OAKLAND County Prosecutor L.
Brooks Patterson said Raymond
Meehan, of Rochester, was arraigned
Tuesday in 52nd District Court in his
hometown on a charge of receiving and
concealing stolen property, a felony
carrying a maximum penalty of five

years' imprisonment and a $2,500 fine.
Last fall, Glenn Lasiuta, 32, of
Warren, was arrested and charged with
possessing microfilms of stolen lists.
He was awaiting trial.
An innocent, plea was entered on
Meehan's behalf. Judge Mildred Vlaich
released him on $5,000 bond, pending a
preliminary examination set for March
5.
"OUR INVESTIGATION indicates
Meehan had been involved in this for 18
years," Patterson told reporters.
He said Meehan was believed to be
the supplier of Lasiuta. Microfilm ad-
dress lists stolen from Michigan Bell
also were seized at Meehan's home,
along with a microfilm viewing
machine and a receipt book that listed
his customers, he said.
Patterson said the evidence indicated
a Detroit-area bank bought a set of the
microfilmed address lists. He did not
name the bank.
THEFT OF the address lists from
Michigan Bell has been the object of
two or three years of investigation. The
probe became public last week, when
police revealed the earlier arrest which
occurred last November.
The listings are believed sold to
collection agencies and other com-
panies that use them to find people who
have moved and taken unlisted
telephone numbers to keep their new
addresses secret from creditors.

Gonzales Daily Photo byu![SA UDELSON
Gonzalesdescribes

To find out how your organization
Richard Barr or Scott Reit at MSA,
3242 or stop by 3909 Union.

can apply, call
763-3241, 763-

MSA has strearnlnedl its procedures for stuydent organiza-
lions to obtain and account for monev given to them.
T ls IS YOUR MONEY-
COME FND 6ET IT!!

MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH
205 Washtenaw Place
SEMINAR-Rhythm & Blues
"Bio-Chemical and Clinical Studies of
Biological Rhythm In Depression
Speakers; ANNA WIRZ-JUSTICE
from NIMH

Chicano s
By MARION HALBERG
Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales knows
what it means to feel shame. For
years, he was ashamed of his
Mexican-American heritage.
But now, pride, not shame, drives
Gonzales, who has devoted much of
his adult life to the cause of his
Chicano people.
EARLIER THIS month, Gonzales
brought his struggle to Ann Arbor,
delivering a talk on "Chicano Com-
munity Organizing in the 1980s" to a
group in the Lawyer's Club. His ap-
pearance was sponsored by a wide
range of campus groups, including
La Raza Law Students Association,
the Trabajadores De La Raza School
of Social Work, and the office of
Minority Student Services.
He was born in 1928 in a Denver
barrio, or Mexican ghetto. His
father, a migrant worker from
Mexico, would tell Corky all about
' his homeland so that he could grow
up and know his heritage.
But when he entered school, Corky
was told that he could no longer
speak Spanish and that his name
was Rudolph and not Rodolfo as his
parents had named him. The shame
had begun.
AS A TEENAGER, Corky won the
Nat'ional Amateur Championship
and the International Championship
in boxing. Although heralded as a
hero by other Chicanos, Corky said
he still suffered a sense of
degradation at being a Mexican- -
American. Although he was an
American, he was still hassled by
immigration authorities who
thought that he was an illegal alien.
Gonzales quit boxing and at the
age of 29 he became the first Chicano
district captain in the Denver
Democratic Party. Soon he received.
more appointments in the party and
held such positions as the president

t rugges
of the National Citizens' Committee
for Community Relations.
Later, however, disillusionment
set in. Gonzales resigned from the
Democratic Party in 1965 because of
what he called the "castration of
humanity, of people, in politics. In
politics they offer you individual
jobs,butnot social changes." He
said he did not want to betray the
Chicano people. And he did not.
IN 1967 HIS POEM, "Yo Soy
Joaquin" (I am Joaquin), was
published, a work considered by
many to be one of the finest contem-
( porary Chicano epic poems. "It is
just a name," Gonzales said-of the
poem, which was later turned into a
book and a film, "in the image of us
all."
I am Joaquin
Lost in a world of confusion
Caught up in a whirlof
Anglo society,
Confused by the rules,
Scorned by the attitudes,
Suppressed by manipulations,
And destroyed
by modern life.. .
In a downtown barrio of Denver,
Gonzales founded La Crusada Para
Justicia - The Crusade for Justice
In his lecture, Gonzales spoke of
these objectives in the Chicano
struggle for self-determination.
"There was the identity factor
when we were able to identify into a
group. We realized we weren't in the
melting pot, but that we were at the
bottom of the scale.
"I recognized that we could not
compromise. I participate in
progressive politics - people
together, people of a common
background, massively protesting
things that are not for their better-
ment."

ROOM 1057
Tea at 3/15

Thurs: January 25 at 3:45 pm

CLEAR UP YOUR FUTURE IN THE 2-YEAR AFROTC PROGRAM.
What's up after college? That question is enough to
get a lot of young people down.
Air Force ROTC college graduates have that worry,
too. But their immediate future (and longer if they choose)
is much more secure. As a commissioned officer, there's a
good job.. ..Travel. Graduate level education. Promotions.
Financial security. And really, lots more.
if you have two academic years remaining, there's a
great 2-year AFROTC program still available to you. Look
into the details. We think you'll be pleasantly surprised.
And pleasantly rewarded.
AFROTC, NORTH HALL, Phone 764-2403
Put it all together in Air Force ROTC.

IT S COMING l t
A SUPER SPECTACULAR EVENT
MICHIG RA S '79
Sat., Feb. 10-8 pm-The Union
To find out more call UAC: 763-1107

Centicore Decoratorsal
20% OFF ORIGINAL ART POSTERS
Frankenthaler * Munch * Vasareley * Miro Calder * Morris Louis*
Klimt * Dali " Rockwell " Many others
$5.00 to $60.00
25 % OFFCALENDARS
Sailing " Sierra Club " Running " Audubon " Gnome " Antiques e
Calligraphy * Literary " Many others
30% OFF KITES
Exotic " Imports " For flying or decorating * Colorful reels
of strinn tnn . fnn +., t n Ml

CONT6CT LENSES
soft and hard* contact lenses $210.00
includes exam, fitting, dispensing, follow-up visits,
starter kits, and 6 month checkup.
* includes a second pair of hard lenses
Dr. Paul C. Uslan, Optometrist
55 Church Straet
769-1222 by appointment

A PLAY
BY DAVID STOREY
JAN. 31-FEB. 3
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE 8 PM
UNIVERSITY SHOWCASE PRODUCTIONS
TICKETS $2 AT PTP OFFICE IN THE
MICHIGAN LEAGUE 764-4450

In
Celebration

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