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December 04, 1979 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-04

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Page 10-Tuesday, December 4, 1979-The Michigan Doily

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MHALE THE ONLY SENIOR

Title beyond reach of youthful Gophers

By STAN BRADBURY
Two things can completely describe
the Minnesota Gophers basketball
program under the direction of fifth
year coach Jim Dutcher-youth and
Kevin McHale.
The Gophers, who finished 11-16 last
year, are the youngest team in the Big
Ten and maybe the nation. They have
just one senior (McHale) and one junior
(Carl Dale, a 6-0 junior college tran-
sfer).
Now you might think this team's
youth is due to losses through
graduation. Not so for the Gophers.

Last year, they started four freshmen
and McHale, meaning they should have
their complete lineup back. But one of
the freshman, Leo Rautins, flew the
coop after last season and another
sophomore is taking his place.
"Our inexperience is going to hurt
us," said McHale, a second team All-
Big Ten performer last year. "They
haven't played enough ball in the con-
ference to know what it's all about."
McHale attempted to explain the
problem the Gophers had last season.
"The freshmen came in with their big
reputations and big egos and we got our
butts kicked. I think last year our
biggest problem was with attitude.
Some of the guays just weren't happy
being on our team."
Those players, including Rautins and
discontent seniors who were forced to
watch instead of play, have left,
McHale said, "So I think we'll be ready
to play this year. We'll win our share of
games."
Rautins, one of the top freshman in
the conference last year, has transfered
to Syracuse to continue his basketball
career and McHale won't miss him.
"Leo thought he was better than he

But for now, Minnesota will have to
depend on the 6-11 center-forward
McHale. In his junior year, McHale
tore up the league statistically. He was
sixth in scoring (19.2 ppg), third in
rebounding (8.7), fourth in free throw
accuracy (.833) and eighth in field goal,
percentage (.511).
McHale was also busy this summer.
He started for the Gold Medal Pan-
American basketball team and he also
starred for the champion United States
team in the World University Games.
He was the only player on both teams.
Joining McHale in the Gophe front
line are Gary Holmes (6-10), and Trent
Tucker (6-5). Minnesota's backcourt
contains Darrell Mitchell (6-4) and
Mark Hall (6-2).
Tucker (9.9 ppg) and Hall (8.5 ppg)
were second and third on the team in
scoring last year.
Minnesota also has a fine group of
newcomers. Freshmen include Zebedee
Howell (6-7) and Ben Coleman (6-9), a
pair of power-forwards, and center
Randy Breuer (7-2).
Breuer is the largest player in
Gopher hoop history and in a recent in-
tersquad scrimmage he scored 33 poin-

ts while playing against McHale.
After sitting out a year because of
trarisfering to Minnesota from South
Florida, Andy Thompson, brother of exr
Gopher great Mychal. The younger
Thompson is 6-7 with great skill ahd
The Big Ten:
Basketball
Battleground
jumping ability but without any high
school or relevant competitive playing
experience.
Experience or not, it would take a
real Mychal Thompson to put the
Gophers in the running this year.

Kevin McHale

was, which caused a lot of problems,"
the team captain said. Rautins was
fourth on the team in scoring and an
overwhelming first in assists with 106.
Even without Rautins, Minnesota's
past two recruiting years have been
most impressive. In two years, if not
sooner, the Gophers will be a very
tough force to tangle with.

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NEW YORK (AP)--Tailback Charles;
White of Southern California, the
second leading rusher in college foot-
ball history, won the 1979 Heisman
Trophy yesterday, easily outdistancing
last year's winner, Billy Sims of
Oklahoma.
White received 453 first-place votes,
144 seconds and 48 thirds for a total of
1,695 points. Sims was a distant second
with 773 points, including 82 first-place
ballots, 180 seconds and 167 thirds.
Brigham -Young quarterback Marc
Wilson was third with 589 points. Wilson
received 72 firsts, 124 seconds and 125
thirds.
WHITE, A six-foot, 185-pound senior
from San Fernando, Calif., led the
nation in rushing this season with 1,803
yards in 10 games. Sims was fourth
with 1,506 yards, but 529 came in his last
two games, after the balloting had
begun.
Although he missed one entire game
and half of another with a shoulder in-
jury and played only the first half in two
other Southern Cal romps, White also
led the nation in all-purpose running
with a 194.1 per-game average.
His rqshing average of 180.3 was a
Pacific-10 Conference single-season
mark, breaking the record of 170.9 by 0.
J. Simpson in 1968. Simpson captured
the Heisman that year, the second of
Southern Cal's three winners. The first
WOMEN'S SWIMMING
PITTSBURGH, Dec. 8
WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS
at Wisconsin, Madison, Dec. 8
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
ADRIAN, Dec. 4 .
at Notre Dame, South Bend, Dec. 8
WRESTLING
at Michigan Open, Mt. Pleasant, Dec. 8
HOCKEY
DARTMOUTH, Dec. 7-8
MEN'S BASKETBALL
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at Marquette, Milwaukee, Dec. 8
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was tailback Mike Garrett in 1965.
WHITE OUTGAINED them all,
becoming the most productive in a
famed string of Southern Cal tailbacks
that includes Garrett, Simpson,
Clarence Davis, Anthony Davis and
Ricky Bell.
"Charlie's the best football player in
America," said Southern Cal Coach
John Robinson.
"He's a fierce competitor who's both
elusive and powerful as a runner, has
great balance and vision, is an ex-
cellent receiver and is the most durable
player I've ever coached. The other
runners occasionally got tired; Charlie
doesn't. I think he could play a
doubleheader.
"HE'S THE toughest player I've ever
seen, too. If you're gonna intimidate
him, it might take you a month. You
better bring your lunch with
you . . . and your dinner."
Of the Heisman, White said, "It is a
great honor, a dream come true and I
was a little stunned by it. I came here
wanting to make good and make a good
impression of myself in growth. It
means a great achievement and
something I'll cherish. It means I have
accomplished somethingeln four years.
"I didn't sleep all night and then
heard the news from Coach Robinson. I
didn't hear the vote except that it was
overwhelming. That I won it is all that
counts."
"If it weren't for my teammates, I
wouldn't be getting this honor. I know
it, but the trophy will go in my house.

AP Photo
HEISMAN TROPHY winner Charles White struts his stuff during a 49-14
USC victory over UCLA on November 24, bashing his way past UCLA's
Tom Sullivan for a touchdown. White triumphed in the annual competition
by a surprisingly large margin over rival Billy Sims of Oklahoma. "This
was the middle of the cake with the Rose Bowl coming up. We're getting
ready to eat our way out," noted White. "It's just good to see my name
still in the papers," he added.

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Tar Heel football takes back seat

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BY BILLY SAHN
"Dee-fense, dee-fense," that's what
they're shouting in Chapel Hill, N.C.
home of the Carolina Tar Heel Gator
Bowl-bound football team. But wait!
These fans are not cheering football,
they're rooting for the famous Tar Heel
basketball squad.
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MICHIGAN 96, Central Michigan 78
Purdue 83, Butler 60
D~etroit 79, Nevada-Reno 69
Northwestern58, Northern Illinois 57
Western Michigan 112, Lake Superior St. 64
Eastern Michigan 53, Cleveland St. 52
Northern Michigan 76,Ripon Wis. 66
Siena Heights 83, Northwood 73
Ferris State 72, Alma 65
NHL
NY Rangers 3, Montreal 3
ARE YOU LETTING
CLASSES GET TO
YOU?
0

"This is basketball country," said
one Tar Heel supporter and student.
"Once basketball starts, football takes
a back seat."
Nevertheless, there is a football
game to be played, a contest against a
'team enriched with strength and
tradition. That team, the Michigan
Wolverines, commands much respect
from the Tar Heel fans.
"We feel awfully distinguished,"
remarked Chapel Hill Mayor Joseph
Nassis, "to be playing a university like
Michigan, one with their tradition."
The initial reaction of Tar Heel fans,
when they learned of their team's
destiny, according to one student, was,
"What are we doing in the Gator
Bowl?" It was evident that the N.C.
supporters were taken by surprise that
their team was going against Michigan
in an important bowl game, much to the
same extent that Wolverine fans were
surprised to be facing a team with the

record of North Carolina (6-3-1). The
N.C. campus is in an excited state.
Still, the fact that Clemson, last
year's ACC Gator Bowl representative
is going to the Peach -Bowl, while North
Carolina State, the winner of the ACC
Conference, is going nowhere appears
perplexing.
According to an N.C. grad student
who attended Michigan as an un-
dergraduate, the general feeling of fans
in Chapel Hill is one of luck - the Tar
Heels finished fifth in their conference.
In spite of their surprising selection to
face Michigan, the general consensus is
that North Carolina doesn't figure to
win in the Gator Bowl.
Granted that Michigan is a more
prominent team than North Carolina,
and probably a more talented conten-
der, the Tar Heels will be undeniably up
for this game.
Come December 28, in Jacksonville,
FL, you will hear the chant of "dee-
fense, dee-fense" streaming out of the
Tar Heel "mike-man's" loud speaker.

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