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December 04, 1979 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-04

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday,.December 4, 1979-Page 11

CAGERS SURGKIN SECOND HALF:
McGee & Co. blitz

CMU, 96-78

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
Blue lightning !
That's what struck down Central
Michigan last night as the Wolverines
ran roughshod over the defending Mid-
American Conference co-champion
Chippewas in posting a convincing 96-78
triumph before a Crisler crowd of 9,732.
Michigan broke away from a six-
point halftime advantage with a 17-5
blitz after the intermission with super-
quick forward Mike McGee doing much
of the damage. McGee, who tallied 27
points in the win over Massachusetts
Saturday, connected for a team-high 34
against CMU, 19 of his points coming in
the final twenty minutes.
Not to say he didn't have help,
because he had plenty. Juniors Marty
Bodnar and Paul Heuerman played
probably the finest games of their
Michigan careers. Bodnar blitzed the
cords with 10 of 17 field goals en route to
a personal high 23 points, while Heuer-
man registered a high water mark of 15
points plus earning game rebounding
honors with 13.
Johnny Orr, the dean of Big Ten
coaches, didn't expect his Wolverines to
have an easy time with Central

Michigan, which upset the University of
Detroit, 72-70 in Mt. Pleasant Saturday.
And for a while, Orr's expectations
were realized. The Blue cagers failed to
hit a field goal for the opening three and
one-half minutes of the contest and
were trailing, 10-9, at 13:31 of the first
half.
That's when Bodnar took over. A
pair of long-range old-fashioned "push"
shots from the corner and two layups
helped Michigan reel off 11 unanswered
points as it seized a 20-10 advantage.
The Wolverines continued to add to
their lead, outscoring the Chippewas 16-
2 over a seven-minute stretch. A Mark

Lozier basket at 7:21 upped the margin
to 36-20. But with Bodnar and Heuerman
taking a breather, CM4U began to chip
away, as Gary Tropf's bucket at 1:02 of
the half sliced the lead to four, 42-38.
The visitors were to come no closer the
rest of the night.
One minor area of concern was the
lack of support from the Michigan ben-
ch. The five starters L- McGee, Thad
Garner, Heuerman, Bodnar and Keith
Smith - outscored CMU 63-33, which
means the production slacked off con-
siderably when the starting unit wasn't
on the court.
One of the positive aspects - and

there were many - had to be the
Wolverines' superb foul shooting.
Michigan canned 26 of 32 from the foul
stripe, an 81.2 percentage, while the
visitors only went to the line six times,
hitting four shots.
Orr was understandably pleased with
his team's performance. "We had it
going pretty good tonight," he said.
"We made a lot of substitutions and
they got back into the game.
An indication of how good Orr's team
really is will come Wednesday night at
8 when Michigan travels to Toledo to
face the Rockets, the cream of the MAC
and an NCAA qualifier last season.

Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG
MICHIGAN'S MIKE McGEE gets two of his game high 34 points as he goes
high against Central Michigan's Mike Robinson In Michigan's 96-78 romp
last night at Crisler Arena.
CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Considering a Graduate Career ?
Come to Boston !
Boston University

r^
Z w_,
/839

McGee ........
Garner...
Heuerman.
Bodnar, Marty
Smith ........
Lozier.. ..
{°,rris....
Person.
JThson.
Bodnar, Mark ."
James .....
Team rebounds.
Totals .........

MICHIGAN
Min FG/A FT/A
37 15/24 4/6
5 2/4 2/2
34 3/8 9/1
36 10/17 3/4
30 1/6 5/6
9 2/2! 0/0
8 1/1 11
2 0/1 0/0
6 1/3 0/0
1 0/0 2/2
1 0/0 0/0
1 010 0/0

R
3
4
13
5
4
1
3
0
1
0
0
0
7

A
2
3
3
2
3
1
4
0
0
0
0

PF
3
3
3
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

Pts
34
6
15
23
7
4
3
0
2
0
0
0

Guydon .......
Rambadt ......
Robinson..
Koger .......
Newman ......
Anderson ......
McLaughlin ...
Sweeney ......
Mason.........
Tropf........
McQuaid .
Team rebounds
Totals .........

Min
30
24
14
27
26
29
17
6
9
8
10

FG/AFT/A R A PF
2/8 0/0 4 3 3
4/6 0/0 5 1 3
3/8 0/0 4 0 5
7/16 0/0 3 l11
3/8 3/4 1 4 3
5/9 0/0 4 3 3
5/13 0/0 4 3 4
0/1 0/0 0 0 2
1/4 1/2 1 0 0-
3/3 0/0 1 0 1
4/5 0/0 1 1 0
8
37/81 4/6 36 16 25

Pts
4
8
6
14
9
10
10
0
3
8
8
78

35/66 26/32 42 16 13

Halftime: MICHIGAN 44, Central Michigan 38
96 Foulded out: Robinson
Technical fouls: CMU coach
Attendance: 9,732

Graduate School
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Boston University offers a
rich selection of advanced programs of study leading to the M.A. and
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Graduate School (Arts and Sciences)
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705 Commonwealth Avenue
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Boston University admits students regardless of their race, color, national origin.
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Afro-American Studies
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Music
Philosophy
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Psychology
Sociology
Theological & Religious Studies

SIMPKINS CHOSEN

UPIAll-Americans

The United Press International
announced its 1979 All-America team
last night. The University of Southern
California placed three members on the
team, including Heisman winner
Charles White.
Michigan linebacker Ron Simpkins
also was named to the first team, while
Wolverine tackle Curtis Greer was
named to the second team. Guard John
Arbeznik received honorable mention.
The UPI All-America team:
OFFENSE: Ken Margerum, Stan-
ford, WR; Junior Miller, Nebraska,
TE; Greg Kolenda, Arkansas, T; Tim
Foley, Notre Dame, T; Brad Budde,
USC, G; Ken Fritz, OSU, G; Jim Rit-
cher, North Carolina St., C; Marc
Wilson, BYU, QB; I'l1y Sims,
Oklaioma, RB; Charles White, USC,

RB; Vagas Ferguson, Notre Dame,
RB; Dale Castro, Maryland, PK.
DEFENSE: Hugh Green, Pittsburgh,
E; Jim Stuckey, Clemson, E; Bruce
Clark, Penn St., T; Steve McMichael,
Texas, T; Ron Simmons, Florida St.,
MG; RON SIMPKINS, MICHIGAN,
LB; Dennis Johnson, USC, LB; Johnnie
Johnson, Texas, DB; Roland James,
Tennessee, DB; Ken Easley, UCLA,
DB; Jim Miller, Mississippi, P.
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The Peace Corps is alive and
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The New School's Graduate Faculty of Political
and Social Science began in the early 1930's as The
University in Exile, a haven for European scholars
driven from' their homelands by tyranny and
persecution. In 1937, Thomas Mann suggested that
this faculty of exiles adopt as its motto "To the
Living Spirit," which was the inscription
on a plaque removed by the Nazis
from the Great Hall at the Univer-
sity of Heidelberg.
Today, more than four dec-
ades later, The Graduate Fac-
ulty continues its commit-
ment to "The Living Spir-
it"-the spirit of free and
rigorous intellectual inquiry.
The Graduate Faculty
provides students with a rich
understanding of the historical
and theoretical foundations of
their disciplines, while also empha-
sizing the interdisciplinary nature of all
the social sciences, and indeed, of all human
knowledge. The aim of The Graduate Faculty is to
develop scholars and practitioners with the capa-
city to create as well as impart knowledge. Thou-
sands of alumni who now serve on college and
university faculties, and in leadership roles in
government, bear its unique stamp.
Once known as "The Little Heidelberg on 12th

Street," the Graduate Faculty is now a community
of more than two thousands students and faculty
members from all over the world, housed in its
own modern building in Greenwich Village. Its
founders and past faculty-Hannah Arendt, Alvin
Johnson, Max Wertheimer, Claude Levi-Strauss,
Horace Kallen, Hans Jonas, Paul Douglas,
Jacques Maritain, Gerhard Colm,
Max Ascoli, Leo Strauss, Arnold.
Brecht, and many others-have
left a magnificent legacy of intel-
lectual distinction and courage.
Their work is now carried on
by the present faculty which
includes such distinguished
scholars as Robert Heil-
broner, Hans Morgenthau,
Saul Padover, Leon Festinger,
DavidGordon, StanleyDiamond,
Mary Henle and Michael Harner.
Through its faculty and noted
scholarly journal, Social Research,
The Graduate Faculty maintains its his-
toric ties to the international academic community.
We invite your interest in joining this dis-
tinguished community in the Spring or Fall of 1980.
At this time, we are accepting applications for
graduate programs in Anthropology, Economics,
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology,
Sociology, and Liberal Studies.

i

Areas of study include:
Psychology
" M.A. and Ph.D. in Personality
" Experimental and
Social Psychology
" M.A. in Mental Health Services
" Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology
Sociology
* Sociological Theory
" Social and Cultural Processes
" Institutional and
Organizational Analysis
" Methods of Social Research
" Peoples and Cultures of the City
Economics
" Political Economy
" Planning and Development
" Industrial Organization
Opportunities are available for financial
aid and for part-time study on a degree or
non-degree basis. Graduate credits earned
while in non-degree status may be applied
towards a degree at a later date. All classes
-day, evening and weekend-are held in
the Albert List Academic Center, Fifth
A.nn. . - 1 3th.. Clihrnn,,nino.. a inll

and International Trade
" Labor Economics
Anthropology
" Cultural Anthropology
" Ecological and
Economic Anthropology
" Cosmology
" Nationalities
" Medical Anthropology
Philosophy
" History of Philosophy
" Continental Philosophy
Phenomenology
" Existentialism
* Hermeneutics
" Political Philosophy
Political Science
" American Government

" Comparative Government
" International Relations
" Political Philosophy
Master of Arts in
Liberal Studies
An interdisciplinary master's pro-
gram for generalists rather than
specialists, M.A.L.S. was begun at
The New School more than ten
years ago with initial support from
the Ford Foundation. The flexible
curriculum examines and inter-
relates the central ideas of all the
social science disciplines, including
literature and the arts, and also
provides special concentrations and
individual study in accordance
with the student's special interests

I The Graduate Faculty Office of Admissions
65Fifth Aenue
NEW SCHOOL FOR NewYorkN.Y. 10003
I SOCIAL RESEARCH
Please send me the Graduate Faculty
Shulletin and annlication for admission. ,,

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