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December 02, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-02

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Page 2-Sunday, December 2, 1979-The Michigan Daily
SECURITY COUNCIL DEBA TE OPENS
U.S.: Release 'not negotiable'
(Continued from Page 1)

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whom were reported to remain in the
hands of Moslem militants who stor-
med the U.S. embassy in Tehran on
Nov. 4, were being held under
degrading conditions, "threatened,
kept bound, isolated, not allowed to
speak, denied mail."
"Even their whereabouts are uncer-
tain," the American delegate said.
McHenry appeared to be alluding to
reports that some captives had been
moved out of the embassy to other
locations.
NOTING THAT those around the
Security Council table were themselves
diplomats protected by the same laws
and rules of conduct as the Tehran
hostages, McHenry said it was for all of
them to speak up to demand the release
of the hostages.
Earlier yesterday, U.N. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim said he spoke
by telephone with Iran's acting foreign
minister Sadegh Ghotbzadeh who ex-
pressed interest in a "peaceful, con-
structive settlement" to the crisis.
Waldheim spoke with reporters after
the 15 members of the Security Council
completed private consultations to
prepare for the public debate. The
debate is scheduled to continue today.
IN TEHRAN, the student militants
produced the cable which they said in-
dicated that two CIA officers -
Malcolm Karp and William Daugherty
- had been sent to the embassy to work
undercover as second and third
secretaries.
Western diplomats said the document
appeared to be authentic, adding that it

was not unusual for CIA personnel to
work under diplomatic cover.
The students said the alleged agents
were among those Americans held
hostage at the embassy for the past four
weeks. They said Daugherty had ad-
mitted he was a CIA officer.
Disclosure of the document and a
statement yesterday from the Foreign
Ministry added to mounting confusion
over the fate of Laingen and U.S. en-
voys Victor Tomseth and Michael
Holland.
THE THREE were at the Foreign
Ministry on business when the embassy
was stormed by the Moslem fundamen-
talist followers of Ayatollah Khomeini
on Nov. 4 to back Iranian demands for
the return of the shah, who is in a New
York hospital. Ghotbzadeh told a press
conference Friday Laingen, Tomseth
and Holland could leave Iran at any
time although the government could not

guarantee their safe passage to the air-
port.
His remark angered the students at
the embassy. They said last night that
the three must stand trial for espionage
along with the other hostages, saying
there was evidence to prove they were
spies.
Yesterday, the Foreign Ministry's
chief spokesman said Ghotbzadeh was
joking Friday when he said Laingen
and the other diplomats were free to
leave Iran.
The students reiterated their stand
yesterday.
"ABOUT LAINGEN, he is a spy and
will be tried like the rest," a student
spokesman said. "We have found lots of
evidence about these people (Laingen,
Tomseth and Holland). They too, will
be tried with the others."
Meanwhile, the former shah
remained secluded in his hospital room

yesterday, still looking for a nation that
will grant him asylum so he can leave
the U.S. Most of his personal belongings
were removed from the New York
Hospital Cornell Medical Center Friday
so he could leave as soon as a haven
was found.
Doctors have said he has recovered
from cancer treatment and gallstone
surgery and is well enough to travel.
A spokesman for the former shah an-
nounced Friday that the deposed ruler
intended to leave during the weekend,
but Thursday night Mexico withdrew
permission for him to seek asylum
there. The spokesman, Chris Godek,
said Friday that this development left
the former shah "quite distressed."
THE FORMER shah asked the Car-
ter administration to help him find
refuge elsewhere, but the only offjicial
response was that he must make his
own travel plans.

Threats against 'U' Iranians
decrease as crisis drags on

(Continued from Page 1)

ONE IRANIAN graduate student, af-
ter being quoted by full name in the
Daily, talked to a caller who said, "I
read about you in the paper. Iranian, go
home." The student said he was not
bothered by the call. He added that his
American friends have been very sup-
portive.
Another student, who received "a
couple" of threatening calls, said he
"hasn't encountered any problem like
that" recently.
"I don't think it's anything serious,"

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he added. "I never thought it was a
problem to begin with."
DARIUSH ADLI, a University
student, said he has heard of acts of .
violence against Iranian students on
other campuses, but "this campus is
relatively calm compared to the rest of
the campuses.'
"People here are more mature, and
understand the problem better," he ad-
ded. "A lot of people are concerned."
Adli said, though, that he and his
friends are still afraid to go out to local
bars.
Two weeks ago, when tensions began
to escalate, "it was starting to get
scary," said Adli.
Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1979
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B. 764-7460
The First National Bank of Chicago (First
Scholars Program) invites candidates going to
Chicago for Christmas who are interested in a
banking career and plan to continue for an MBA to a
reception on December 27, 1979. Deadline for your
resume is December 8, 1979. A brochure describing
the program and information on the reception is
available at Career Planning & Placement.
Cleveland area employers will interview
Clevelanders home on vacation graduating 1979-1980.
The Annual College Interview Center sponsored by
the Greater Cleveland Association will be held at the
Cleveland Plaza Hotel, December 26;27, & 28, 1979.

AFSHAN SAID he does not think the
American people know the complete
story of the situation in Iran. "In the
news they hear the shah is modernizing
the country," he said. "Either the shah
stole all the money or spent it on the
army."
He also'referred to U.S. involvement
in Iran in 1953 when the Prime Minister
of Iran (Mossadeq) "was a very
popular man." Afshan said the leader
was overthrown with the help of the
United States Central Intelligence
Agency (CIA), which, he added, also
"trained the Iranian secret police."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 72
Sunday, December 2. 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Ma nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
4819. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

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