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December 02, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

--mm"

SPEAKER AT WORKPLACE DEMOCRACY SERIES

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 2, 1979-Page 3

UA W rep says firms need worker opinions

Alfred Hitchcock's 1935
THE THIRTY-NINE STEPS
The comic thriller that still sets the standard for fast-paced. ROBERT DONAT
is the victim of every embarrassing circumstance imaginable. Hitchcock has
him blamed for the murder of a stranger in his apartment, being mistaken
for the main speaker at a political rally where he's gone to escape the police,
and going handcuffedfor a night to a woman who can't stand him. With
MADELEIN CARROLL.
Mon.: INUIT FILM SERIES
Jigging for Lake Trout & Alaska Films (free at 8)
Tues.: MISSOURI BREAKS

By LORENZO BENET
One of the first things taught in
Economics 201 is the yardstick for cor-
porate investment is the expected rate
of profit return.
But because of its single-mifided
search for profit, big business rarely
takes into consideration the needs of (he
community and work force when
making investment decisions, accor-
ding to Sheldon Friedman, a research
director for the United Auto Workers
(UAW) union.
FRIEDMAN SPOKE Friday night to
a crowd of 75 as part of a weekend
"Work and Workplace Democracy
Film and Lecture Series" held at the
Residential College auditorium.
The research director discussed the
case of Youngstown (Ohio) Sheet and
Tube Company, whose owners refused
to reinvest in the firm because they
found little or no return on the invest-
ment. Consequently, he said, the plant
deteriorated and eventually closed,
leaving 5,000 workers jobless.
Ira Arlook, a member of the Ohio
Public InterestaCampaign, also spoke
Friday night and said the owners of
Youngstown Sheet and Tube owned
other firms in other industries which
yielded a greater profit return than
Youngstown. This prompted them to
take Youngstown's profits and reinvest
them in other firms, leaving nothing for
Youngstown Sheet and Tube, he added..
"IF THE owners of Youngstown Sheet
and Tube lived in Youngstown and had
no other business interests, the closing
might not have occurred," added
Arlook.
The program was sponsored by the
University's Institute of Labor and In-
dustrial Relations, The Residential
College, the University Resources Cen-
ter, and the Collective Negotiations
Program of the School of Education.
Friday's event also featured a film
entitled "The Fight Against Black
Monday," an ABC-T.V. documentary
which chronicled the closing of
Youngstown Sheet and Tube, and
community, union and worker efforts to
reopen and run the mill.
THE TOWNSPEOPLE, the documen-
tary showed, attempted to harness per-
sonal, community, private, and federal
resources to achieve that goal.
"However, President Carter did not
provide the necessary federal long-
term loans and thus the attempt
failed," Arlook said. The effort needed
a total of $500 million to succeed, not all
from the federal government, he added.
Friedman explained that workers
rarely can come= up with the capital
necessary to purchase and operate. a
business of this size.
"Evsifi'Ifwrkers coup -&iiiieup with
the capital, I question whether or not
they should be encouraged to invest in a
deteriorated company," he stressed.

"IT IS A very big risk, and the
workers, who've already lost their jobs
would be putting their savings and
assets in jeopardy."
Friedman suggested workers who in-
vest their money in weak businesses
should be protected by a federal in-
surance policy that would reimburse
them if they lost all their asstets in the
venture.
He also said the government should
adopt a new national policy that would
give workers the right to know why the
company is closing, to see if the process
can be reversed, to receive severance
pay in the event of a closing, and to see

if the ownership can be passed along to
the community.
"THERE IS presently a bill in
Congress entitled 'the National Em-
ployment Priorities Act which would
give communities these rights," he
said.
The hill, which is sponsored by
Michigan Sen. Don Riegle and
Michigan Con. Willliam Ford, also
would give workers the right to request
a hearing on a firm's status if the in-
dividuals feel the owners are letting the
firm run down. The bill also establishes
a national agency to find alternative
products for financially strapped firms

thinking of closing, added Friedman.
He also said management could
provide a mechanism for workers'
voices, such as Chrysler did in naming
UAW President Douglas Fraser to its
board of directors.
"We have no economic weapons to
challenge big business," said Arlook.
"But we do have electoral power to
pressure the government into accepting
our ideas."
He said the process involves getting
the right people into office and then
utilizing the legislative and ad-
ministrative actors to challenge cor-
porate decision-making policies.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

THE EA
Max Ophuls crea

INEMAlj-
PRESENTS y
1 -w IL 0 w- w. A -a =w s M M"-..L

E,

LRRINGS OF MADAME DE.. .

Carter up in polls

w"

local Dems

(Max Ophuls, 1953)
ted his masterpiece with MADAME DE . .

ricate

His int

still say. it's Kennedy in 1980

tracking camera work perfectly suits this story of love-and lovers, marriage
and affairs around the turn of the century. "If the cinema had produced no
other artists except Ophuls and (Jean) Renoir, it would still be an art form
of profundity and splendor."-Andrew Sarris. With CHARLES BOYER,
DANIELLE DARRIEUX, and VITTORIO DE SICA. French, with subtitles.
(105 min)
ANGELL HALL $1.50 7:00 & 9:00

M

(Continued from Page 1)
Despite the AP-NBC News poll,
Holland said he thought Kennedy would
be chosen by the Democratic Party for
the 1980 election. "People arerreally
down on the country right now and they
see him as a savior," Holland said.
In contrast to students interviewed
yesterday, Democratic activists and
party regulars have come out strongly
in favor of Kennedy locally. At the state
level, a draft-Kennedy movement in-
cludes Speaker of the Michigan House
Bobby Crim and state Attorney General
Frank Kelley, who declared their sup-
port for Kennedy in mid-September.
THE MEMBERS of the Kennedy
committee - among them University
Professor Wilbur Cohen - began
raising funds right after the senator
declared on Nov. 7 so his campaign
would qualify for federal matching
campaign funds.
The Kennedy effort at the state level
has been paralleled by a Carter group
whose members include Michigan's
Secretary of State Richard Austin,
state Senate Majority Leader William'
Faust and Detroit Mayor Coleman
Young.
The state's Carter for President
Finance Committee includes Univer-
sity Regent Robert Nederlander as co-
chair, and Regents Thomas Roach (D-
Grosse Pointe), Sarah Power (D-Ann
Arbor) and Paul Brown (D-Petoskey).
KENNEDY SUPPORTERS said that
since the senator formally declared his
candidacy Nov. 7, local organizing ac-
tivities for Kennedy have 1irtually
ceased.
But they also say the lack of publicity
brought on by the Iranian crisis will not
hurt Kennedy's campaign in the long
run.
Vivian said while Michigan is impor-
tant to the Kennedy campaign because
of the number of delegates the state will
send to the Democratic National Con-

vention, the senator is now concen-
trating on states with early primaries.
"The action is principally in places
like Florida, like Iowa, like New Ham-
pshire," Vivian said.
UNIVERSITY LAW student and
Democratic activist Marc Abrams
suggested that even if people are
behind Carter in Michigan's Second
District, which includes Ann Arbor, it
will not matter in the battle for the
Democratic nomination in 1980.
Abrams said Democratic activists
locally are solid in their support for
Kennedy, and since Michigan delegates
will be selected through a caucus in-
stead of a primary, the support of the
activists is what counts in the state.
Meanwhile, Kennedy, campaigning
in California in his first cross-country
sweep, criticized what he called the
President's weak response to terrorist
attacks on Americans, while continuing
to support Carter's efforts to resolve
the Iranian crisis.
Kennedy criticized Carter's policy
toward Chile, j saying that the
president's actions in that country have
been weak and ineffective.
IN 1976 exiled Chilean Foreign
Minister Orlando Letelier and his
American aide Ronni Moffitt were

assassinated on a Washington, D.C.,
street. Three terrorists were convicted
of the murders, but the Chilean gover-
nment has refused to give up the secret
police agents who allegedly plotted the
assassination.
Earlier this week Carter temporarily
'recalled the American Ambassador to
Chile, and the State Department in-
dicated current foreign aid programs to
Chile would not be renewed.
Kennedy said yesterday Carter
should order the Chilean Ambassador
in Washington home, while continuing
diplomatic relations with the South
American country.
He said all military aid should be cut
off "now and completely." The State ,
Department has said it intends to let the
current $6.6 million in military aid due
to Chile simply run out, but that it
would not be cut off.

-

I

Tuesday: SAMBIZANGA

. ..

! Guess
Who's Back?

5th Avenue at Liberty St. 761-9700
Formerly Fifth Forum Theater

THE $1.50
BA RGA INII
NATIONAL
LAMPOON@'
ANIMWAL
Sat, Sun-i1:50,.13:50, 6:00, 8:00,.10:00
Sot, Sun-Adults $1.50 til 2:15 (or capacity)
Adults $2.50 til 4:30 (or capacity)
Mon, Tues-6:00, 8:00. 10:00
Mon, Tues-Adults $1.50 til 6:30 (or capacity)

starring
JOHN
BELUSHI

Use Daily
Classifieds

Fresh winter snow
blankets Ann Arbor

GS
SUNDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-39 Steps, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
All Brahms recital, Jelinek-Gurt Duo with guest clarinetist David
Shifrin, 8 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
MEETINGS
Gay Discussion Group-"What Does Our Group Want to be When It Grows
Up?", 6p.m., Guild House.
MISCELLANEOUS
Computing Center Open House, 1-5 p.m., Computer Center.
Re-evaluation counseling-introductory lecture, 7:30 p.m., Friends
Meetinghouse, 1420 Hill Street.
"The Fleeting Estate," television program, Prof. Douglas Kahn, Univer-
sity Law School, host, 6:30 a.m., WJBK-TV.
MONDAY
FILMS
Ecology Center and Ann Arbor Public Library-Eat, Drink and be Wary,
Can We Fish Again?, The Killing Ground, and A Place to Live, 7:30 p.m.,
meeting room, Ann Arbor Public Library.
Wesley Foundation-Martin the Cobbler, 12:10 p.m., brown bag lunch,
Wesley Foundation.
r PERFORMANCES
Women's Glee Club-In concert with Pioneer High School Women's
Chorus, 8 p.m., Pioneer High School Aud.
SPEAKERS
Center for Social Concerns-Adult Foster Care Homes, Part III: Com-
munity Response to AFC Homes, 7:30 p.m., Catacombs Room, Holy Trinity
Chapel and Student Center, 511 W. Forest, Ypsilanti.
Mary Ann Largen, speaking on sexual harassment, 8 p.m., Union
Ballroom.
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies-Prof. Svat Soucek,
llratrn Aci anlMnnnl. RHP -a Tmnrpccin frn aRnt iit "a

(Continued from Page 1)
Huron who found plenty of inexpensive
ammunition.
State Street-area shoppers had mixed -L
feelings about the weather. "I like the
snow," LSA freshman. Keith Terhall
said, "but I don't like the cold that goes
along with it."
APRIL OJA, an Ann Arbor resident,
found nothing objectionable about the
snow. "I love the snow, it's picture post-
card pretty," she said.
Susie Mikolajewski, a junior in nur-
sing and a Delta Delta Delta sorority
member, was bell-ringing for the
Salvation Army. She said, "I love it
(the weather), it's the first really big
snow. It's perfect for December first."
Roger Lelievre, another Ann Arbor
resident, enjoyed the first snowfall but
said he felt he could only take the snow
for so long.,
"I THINK it's great. I'm from the
U.P. and I really miss a big blizzard,"
he said. "For a month I like it - then it
can all melt," he added with a laugh.
Local merchants said they were not
bothered by the snow and Susan Siegel,
owner of The Finishing Touch in the
Nickels Arcade, said the snow even
helped business.
"Loads of people have been coming in.
The snow has made people realize that
Christmas is on it's way."
CLIFF HOWLETT, assistant
manager of Van Boven's clothing store
in Nickels Arcade, said, "We have a
good run of business. It'll take more
precipitation than this to keep people
away."
Both the Ann Arbor police and the
Michigan State Police said few traffic

problems have arisen because of the
snow. They said difficulties were not
anticipated last night.
For those people who hope to escape
to the soputh - beware. The tem-
perature in Jacksonville, Fla. Friday
night was a record low 28 degrees.
RESUMES
THESES - DISSERTATIONS
COVER LETTERS
REPORTS
SOFT COVER BINDING
24-HOUR TURN AROUND
THE TYPING POOL
612 SOUTH FOREST
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
(313) 665-9843
OFFICE HOURS
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
10:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

plw (;oun
Invites You To
Join Him For:
Sunday:
SANDWICH NIGHT 6pm-11 pm
Monday:
PIZZA NIGHT 6pm-12am
Tuesday:
SOUP & SALAD 6pm-12am
Wednesday:
PASTA NIGHT 6pm-11pm
Thursday:
PITCHER NIGHT Bpm-2am
r ipasto

1140 S. University 668-8411

Mon.-Sat. 11a.m.-2a.m.
Sun. 3p.m.-12a.m.

The Office of Major Events Presents
3 h d nn rbor Folk Festival

Sunday January 13
two shows
Four acts each show with
DAVID BROM BERG
in each, others include:
JOHN HAMMOND, JR

at the Power Center
2pm & 7:30pm
Tickets are 7.50 per show or

'N

OWEN

MC BRIDE

MARY MC CASLIN
JIM RINGER
RED CLAY RAMBLERS
LEON REDBONE

12.50 for both
sale this Wedn
at 11:30 at the
Box Office, Scd
Herb David Gui
Elderly Inst rurr
Lansing. For n
call 763-2071.

. They go on
esday December 5
Michigan Union
hoolkids Records;
tar Studio, and
'ents in East
pore information

i

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