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September 07, 1979 - Image 119

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-07

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 7, 1979-Page 7-A
Storms brew in David's wake

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Re-
public (AP)-The human toll taken
by hurricane David in the Dominican
Republic continued to climb yesterday,
to an official Civil Defense and police
count of 1,100.
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Frederic,
downgraded from a hurricane Monday,
hovered over Hispaniola in the Carib-
bean, dumping heavy rains on the
already-swillen Dominican Republic.
Another tropical storm -
Gloria - developed off the coast
of Africa, and a weather disturbance
took shape in the Gulf of Campeche off
the Mexican coast which forecasters
said could become a tropical
depression.
DOMINICAN Republic Civil Defense
Director Pedro Justianiano Polanco

said 400 people were missing, more
than 3,000 were injured and 150,000 were
without homes. The loss to property and
crops was estimated at $1.5 billion.
A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in
Santo Domingo said the rain and
flooding rivers had all but covered
many communities in the south and
southwestern parts of this nation, which
shares the island of Hispaniola with
Haiti. The report was made after
helicopters traveled over the zone for
the first time.
Frederic drifted slowly toward the
northwest yesterday.
"The steering currents are really
weak," said researcher Preston Lef-
twich of the National Hurricane Center.
"There's nothing to really push it out
one way or another very fast."

LEFTWICH PREDICTED Frederic
would pass over the nortern coast of.
Haiti before heading over open water
early today. He said the storm should
gain strength over the warm water and
could possibly regain hurricane force
winds of 74 mph or more.
"Since the center is so poorly defined
it's hard to say where it's going to come
out, but it definitely has the potential to
strengthen when it gets out over the
water," Leftwich said.
Frederic has followed a path similar
to David, which swirled through the
Caribbean and then up the U.S. eastern
coast.
"It's at least three or four days

away," he said. "It's in a similar track
to David's but in a week's time the
steering currents can change."
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Gloria
was born yesterday about 750 miles
northwest of the Cape Verde islands off
the western tip of Africa. It was moving
toward the west northwest betwen 15
and 20 mph with winds up to 50 mph.
Leftwich said Gloria was on a more
northerly course than David and
Frederic, which also develolped in the
east Atlantic. He said Gloria could
possibly develop into a hurrican within
a few days. If Gloria stays on its
present course, it will pass north of the
Leeward Islands and Pureto Rico in
three or four days, he said.

Plan to increase
refugee quotas.
passes in Senate

Daily Photo by LISA UDELSON
IASU1ENAW COMMUNITY College (WCC) counselor Dennis Burton explains
to a sleriff's department how he was hit by a car while official attempting to break
a pickt line. The unidentified driver of the car looks on. Burton was not seriously
injure[:
Talks scheduled in
WCC teacher strike.

(Continued from Page 1)
td gethelp with Blue Cross, let alone
anothe-, lesser-known carrier.'
Pollock said the administration
wants to add a clause which would
allow br Blue Cross/Blue Shield or an
S"equi alet"V policy to cover em-
ploye6. "We're looking at rising health
casts,' he said. "We would offer the.
same medical service for reduced
rates, ut not a reduction in the level of
healthcare we can provide."
. The union reported that the college
was ofering a 6.8 per cent pay hike,
while the union was asking for an 8.8
per cmt raise. The college is also
askint the employees to accept a
heavir teaching load.
P°OEOCK, representing the ad-
minisration said the college's current
offer was "within presidential wage,
guideines," but would not comment
further.
Theunion also said yesterday that a
private Board of Trustees meeting held
Wednsday night may have been
illega; but Pollock said that a notice of
the closed meeting was posted in com-
pliance with the state's Open Meetings
Act.
One striker said the teachers had
been picketing and blocking entrances
to the college facilities from 6 a.m. to 8
p.m. since Tuesday. Earlier . in the
week, few problems were reported, but
yesterday afternoon several incidents
did occur on the picket line.
WCC COUNSELOR Dennis Burton
was hit by a car travelling from E.
Huron River Drive towards Clark St.
Observers reported that strikers stop-
ped the car to talk to the driver, but that
the unidentified man drive off and
struck Burton as he attempted to move
away from the car. e was not
seriously injured.
SEVERAL SIMILAR incidents were
also reported.
Also, as a result pf diversion of traffic
which normally uses lie campus drive,
cars lined up on E, !uron River Dr.,
causing several accidents during rush
hour traffic. Wshtenaw County
sheriff's deputies were present.
Pollock would not comment on the
problems.
One 47-year-old striking teacher who
requested anonymity, said he had been
teaching at the college for 13 years, and
at no time has a strike been this impor-

tant to the teachers.
"I'M NOT USED to this, and I don't
like doing it, but there's no other way,"
he said. "I just don't understand why
they're doing this to us."
He said he was particularly angered
by reports that "scab teachers" were
being brought in by the administration.
"The faculty has never been more
together on anything in the 13 years I've
been here," he said..
Several students were also out
picketing with the teachers.
"I WANT MY t'eachers back in my
classes right away, and I'll do anything
to get them back," said WCC
sophomore Jan Russell. "They really
deserve what they're asking.
"The college doesn't really care
about people. They call us credit
generators, not students," she added.
Russell also said she wouldn't return
to classes unless she knew her teachers.
were satisfied with their contract.
'If it means I have to stand out here
at term, then I will," she said.
OTHER STUDENTS, who were
coming in to register or buy books and
were not aware of the strike, said they
support the striking teachers.
"I'm with you all the way," shouted
one as he drove away from the college
.entrance.
Classes at the college, located near
Arborland at E. Huron River Drive and
Clark St., were to have begun Wed-
nesday.
Pollock said that registration for
classes was continuing and that all
college offices were open.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate
yesterday approved President Carter's
proposal to increase the number of
refugees allowed to enter the United
States to 50,000 each year and to exceed
the ceiling in emergency situations.
The legislation, passed on an 85-0
vote, still faces action in the House.
Sen. Edward Kennedy, (D-Mass.),
said Carter already plans to resettle
200,000 refugees in the United States
next year by using existing authority to
exceed prescribed limits.
THE CURRENT ceiling on refugees
is 17,400, but the ceiling is regularly
surpassed.
Kennedy, chairman of the Judiciary
Committee, said the United States has
accepted an average of 44,000 each year
since 1956 by use of the "parole'
authority" of the attorney general
which allows admission of additional
persons under urgent humanitarian
circumstances.
The legislation also raises the ceiling
on all types of immigrants allowed to
enter the country annually to 320,000.
The current ceiling is 290,000.
The parole authority of the attorney
general would be revoked. by the bill.
Instead, the president would be allowed
to exceed the 50,000 limit if he believes
it would be justified by "urgent
humanitarian concerns" or is in the'
national interest.
HE WOULD BE required to consult in
advance with the Judiciary committees
of the House and Senate and describe
which refugees he wanted to admit, the
plans and cost of their resettlement,
and a description of how other countries
are assisting in the resettlement of the
refugees.
Sen. Walter Huddleston, (D-Ky.),
complained the bill creates "an open-
ended admission program with little
congressional control." He voted for
the legislation, however, after approval
of his amendment requiring that the
50,000 ceiling drop back to 17,400 after
three years.
HUDDLESTON SAID the United
States will spend more than $1 billion on
refugees in 1980. Sen. Strom Thurmond,
(R-S.C.), estimated the cost at $404.4
million.

The bill provides for 100 per cent
reimbursement to states for two years
after- a refugee's arrival for medical
treatment, cash payments and em-
ployment programs.
On a voice vote, the Senate approved
an amendment by Sens. Alan Cranston,
(D-Calif.), and S. I. Hayakawa, (R-
Calif.), authorizing $110 million to con-
tinue for one year an ongoing program
that reimburses states for cash
payments and medical assistance to
Indochina refugees already in this
country.
Cranston said an estimated 213,000
Indochina refugees in the United States
are receiving assistance and that
California houses 43,000 "welfare
refugees."
Also approved was an amendment by
Sen. Lawton Chiles, (D-Fla.) phasing
out assistance to Cuban refugees in this
country over a three-year period.

Put Your Money in the
Feminist Federal Credit Union
and Know that Your Money
Is Working for Women, tool
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P.O. Box 8360
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CINEMA. II
Presents
TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT
(Howard Hawks, 1944)
BOGART, as the detached American expatriate Harry Morgan, is
persuaded to join the fight against fascism in Vichy-controlled Mar-
tinique. Paired with LAUREN BACALL in her screen debut, their scenes
together achieve a rare liberation from the conventional confines of
acting. Superb supporting performances by DAN SEYMOUR as the
grossly evil Captain Benard, and by WALTER BRENNAN4 as Bogart's
rummy sidekick, Eddie. Based on Hemingway's novel. "If You Want
Me, Just Whistle." (100 min.) 7:00 only
MY MAN GODFREY
(Gregory LaCova, 1936)
One of the truly great screwball Comedies of the Thirties, this pointed
take-off on Depression realities has WILLIAM POWELL as one of the
"nouveau poor,," ruined by the crash and adapting himself to life in
the city dump. Featuring CAROLE LOMBARD in one of her finest
screen performances. (90 min.) 9:00 only
ANGELL HALL
$1.50, $2.50 for double feature
Tomorrow: MURMER OF THE HEART

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New Release
PAUL MZIlc~yNDLES
PAUL McCANDLESS
All The Mornings Bring
(Oregon Member)

INFORMATION AND APPLICATIONS FOR
FULBRIGHT-HAYS
FELLOWSHIPS
to Study Abroad
are available at the
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP OFFICE
160 A RACKHAM BUILDING
Deadline for submission of applications for 1980-81 competition is
October 8, 1979
INQUIRIES: please call Vincent P. McCarren-764-2218

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OREGON
Roots In The Sky

The Athlete's Shop
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Ensemble improvisation.

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