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September 07, 1979 - Image 120

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-A-Friday, September 7, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Henry Ford steals show at last news conferenee

DETROIT (UPI)-Ford Motor Co.F
Chairman Henry Ford II said a brief
farewell to reporters and directed fur-s
ther questions to company President
The word's o n rumpus
If you want to be in the know, you should
be reading The Daily -
the latest in news, sports, les offaires
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Philip Caldwell.
But he still managed

to steal the

show.
FORD, WHO this,

year will give up

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executive control of the firm his .gran-
dfather founded, was virtually mobbed
yesterday by reporters after what
almost surely will be his last news con-
ference as the company's chief
executive officer.
As usual, he was questioned on sub-
jects ranging from national politics to
the possibility of a Ford family member
gaining executive control of the cor-
poration in years ahead.
He disclosed he already has allowed
his direct supervisory role over the
firm to decline, said he hasn't laid
specific plans for the future-except to
take a leisurely trip around the
world-and conceded the company oc-

casionally builds a "lemon."
FORD, 62; SAID in May he will turn
over duties as the company's chief
executive officer to Caldwell on Oct. 1.
He will retain his chairmanship of the
board of directors and the company's
finance committee, but will play no ac-
tive role after that in daily company
operations.
Ford, who has been the company's
top executive office since 1945, said he
doesn't know how long he will remain
as board chairman.
"I LEFT IT vague on purpose so I
could get out in two months if I want
to," he said.
"I haven't thought it through," he

said. "I don't know what I'm going to
do.
"I'm going to take a world-wide tour
over a long period of time."
That tour, he said, will be to inspect
all of the company's foreign in-
stallations.
HE SAID HIS son, Edsel, is doing "a
fine job" as a top executive in Ford's
Australian operations. Questioned on
whether the young Ford might take
control of the company some time, he
responded:
"He's got a chance for it if he proves
himsell to be capable of it."
Ford also said his support for
President Carter has waned.

"THE CARTER administratioi hs
been very difficult on the auto indtstry
in many, many ways,"-he said. "Ihink-'
they've been unrealistic in their ap
proach on some of our problems. f
"I'm not as big a supporter of JinmyI
Carter as I was in 1976." 7"
The news conference was the inal :
event in the company's two-day l980' ,
model preview. Caldwell gave a
generally optimistic forecast for Ford
in 1980 and succeeding years.
Ford put it more directly:
"There willbe good years, therewill
be great yers, there will be medbcre
years and there will be bad years,just
as in the past."

w

-12

. /

JOHN HUSTON RETROSPECTIVE 1941
THE MALTESE FALCON
HUMPHREY BOGART as Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, one of the toughest
private eyes in detective fiction and cinematic history. A tour de force of
ensemble acting, intelligent dialogue and stylish direction rarely duplicated.
In his first film Huston has MARY ASTOR, SIDNEY GREENSTREET, and PETER
LORRE looking for a blackbird that may or may not exist. Short: FRONT E
BACK (Andrew Lugg, 1972)-A witty Slide Show of Postcards.
Sot: Hitchcock's SECRET AGENT
Sun: THE THIN MAN

OFFICIALS DENY SOVIET TROOPS IN CUBA:
Cuban natives note

Russians

. C r

CINEMA GUILD

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HAVANA, Cuba (AP) - The
Russians in tuba, whoever they are
and whatever their mission, are
keeping a low profile during the current
summit meeting here of non-aligned
leaders - many of whom frown on big-
power alliances.
But they are definitely here, accor-
ding to long-time residents and obser-
vers who say that, after the native
Spanish, Russian is the most common
language heard on the streets of
Havana.
The Cuban government has ridiculed
U.S. assertions that 2,000 to 3,000 Soviet
combat troops are stationed on this

communist-governed Caribbean island,
but they have not flatly denied it.
WHEN ASKED about Soviet troop
presence, Cuban officials shrug, smile
or inquire why one would want to know.
"You Americans see Russians
everywhere, don't you," one Cuban
Foreign Ministry official said.
It is not known where the Soviet
troops are thought to be in Cuba, though
presumably they would be. ,stationed
well away from the capital. U.S. of-
ficials say that besides. the combat
brigade, there are estimated to be 1,500
to 2,000 Soviet military advisers and
technical military personnel in Cuba.

( NEE

In Havana's downtown area,
overlooking the cobalt blue sea, stands
a 25-story building topped off with cone-
shaped antennas. The building is guar-
ded closely by Cuban security men. No
unauthorized person is allowed to ap-
proach.
INSIDE, ACCORDING to reliable
sources, Russians, East Germans, and
Czechs work. It is not an embassy.
Their families also stay there, the sour-
ces report.
As in other foreign posts, the
Russians generally keep to themselves,
using separate facilities and seldom
making unapproved, casual contact
with the local people. But during the
summit they are particularly un-
noticeable.
"They disappeared from sight about
two weeks ago," said an East European
journalist covering the conference.
"It's clear they were told to...." and
he flicked his hands in a scattering
gesture.
ASKED WHERE the "Soviet combat
troops" were, a Cuban woman working
as a guide at the summit conference
said laughingly: "Come with me. I will
take you all over the island and I bet
you won't see one Russian soldier."
If Aso, according to some foreign ob-
servers, that may be testimony to the
Soviet proclivity for avoiding too much
public exposure overseas.
But the telltale evidence of the
U.S.S.R.'s almost two-decade-old
friendship with Cuba can be seen all

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over Havana. Soviet-made panthose,
sells for the equivalent of $6 in slops. % .
The Russian language is taught i all,
schools, and if English does not wowk in,
conversation with Cubans on the st'eet,
Russian often does.
Each night a long line stretches ip to,
the Moscou restaurant in Havana'snew
section. Insidebthe somberly deconted
dining area, where air conditioninghas
re-created a Siberian climate, not a
Slavic face was in sight one nightthis
week. Tables were occupied by Cuans'
eating fried fish, chicken salad, and
other dishes found in Cuban restaran-
ts.
BLINIS, A favorite Russian d, 4
were on the menu but unavailablethate
night. But one could order caviar aI$5 a
portion, along with a liter of French
champagne for $45.
The main Russian bookstor is
prominently located across the seet
from the Floridita. Bar, famous a the
one-time refuge of Ernest Hemingvay -°
and home of tasty daiquiris.
The Lada, the Soviet Uniin's
homemade Fiat, vies with 150s" '
American cars in Havana's still un-
clogged traffic.
Cuban officials would rather :alk
about the U.S. military presence atthe "'
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in 'C4
eastern Cuba than about a Soiet L'
military presence The Cubansre erd '
the angry protests in Washingto as tic
fabricated hysteria aimed at spoing '
the non-aligned summit.
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