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September 07, 1979 - Image 118

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-07

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Page 6-A-Friday, September 7, 1979-The Michigan Daily
An Invitation to Episcopalians
at the
You are welcome to join us in our weekly Sunday
programs:
At St. Andrews Church
306 N. Division (at Catherine)
9 am.-UNIVERSITY STUDY GROUP
The first topic will be a three-part film, "THROUGH JOY
AND BEYOND-THE LIFE OF C.S. LEWIS." The film will be
shown in the Recreation Room on September 9, 16 & 23.
The session on September 30 will be devoted to discussion.
10 a.m.-WORSHIP
Join your fellow students and the people of St. Andrews
parish for regular Sunday Services.
12 noon-LUNCHEON AND FELLOWSHIP
Beginning September 16, a simple meal will be provided
each week for students, followed by time for informal
socializing.
AT CANTERBURY LOFT
332S. State St. (2nd Floor)
6 p.m.-SUNDAY EVENING MEDITATION
Personal exploration in Christian Spirituality led by Chap-
lain Andrew Foster beginning September 16.
CANTERBURY LOFT, the Episcopal Campus Ministry, Serves Episcopalians
at the University of Michigan and Sponsors programs in the Arts which have
ethical or spiritual themes. For information, Please call 665-0606. Rev.
Andrew Foster, Chaplain.

SHAPIRO TO CONFER WITH ADVISORY GROUP:
Academic v-p. hunt gearing up

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By MITCH CANTOR
Harold Shapiro, the University's
vice-president for academic affairs,
will have significant input as to who his
successor will be when he takes over
the University presidency Jan. 1, ac-
cording to the chairman of the advisory
committee searching for the next vice-
president.
Since Shapiro is moving from the
number two University post to the
number one spot, he will be working
very closely with his replacement, ac-
cording to Richard Corpron, chairman
of the nine-member Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs
(SACUA).
SACUA, ALONG with two students to
be selected by Interim University
President Allan Smith and the
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA),
will comprise the advisory committee
that will recommend candidates to the
Regents. The Board will make the final
decision.
"Certainly' Mr. Shapiro is going to
hve to say a great deal about it (the
search process). We will have to talk to
Shapiro ... to decide what type of per-
son he'll want," Corpron said yester-
day.,
SACUA met to begin discussing the
search late in August, but very few
details of the search have been worked
out, according to Engineering Prof. Ar-
ch Naylor, vice-chair of SACUA.
"I WOULD SAY we're in the process
of drawing up the process," Naylor said
yesterday.
Currently, however, Corpron and
Naylor say the search will strongly
resemble the one used when Shapiro
was hired to the same position in 1977.

According to the plan-then called for
by former president Robben Fleming
and similarly by President Allan Smith
this year-the advisory committee will
present a small list of final candiates to
the Regents, who will make the final
decision. The Board members, though
not bound to the list of five or six can-
didates, will likely select one of the
finalists, according to Corpron.
THE ADVISORY committee will ac-
cumulate possible candidates, from
various sources, including those who
respond to ads which have been placed
in higher education publications.
Among the qualifications mentioned
in the notices for candidates are "suf-
ficent budget experience" and
"demonstrated creative and efficient
administrative leadership in program

planning, development and coor-
dination."
While no one involved in the search
has predicted how many people will ap-
ply for the position, between 50 and 60
applications and resumes were turned
in during the last presidential search.
AFTER THE advisory committee
members whittle the list down to about
20 or 30, they will interview some of the
applicants before composing their final
list, Corpron said.
Both the SACUA members and ad-
ministrators say the search will resem-
ble the presidential search in many
ways. They agree, for instance, that the
same strict secrecy that marked the
recently-concluded search should be
part of the vice-presidential search.
"Considering the number of people in
the (presidential) process it was

beautifully handled," Naylor said.H
along with Corpron, Shapiro, a;;
Smith, feels strongly that names
candidates shouldn't be publicized f
fear that being in the limelight miglk
prompt some of the candidates to dro$
out of contention.
ACCORDING TO Smith, the Regents,
won't have quite as extensive role in
this selection.
"I think there won't be quite as ex-
tensive consultation by Regents with
people around the country," Smith,,
said.
Those involved in the search say it's
too early to list specific qualifications
they are looking for.
The deadline for nominations to the
post is October 20. Corpron said he
hopes the selection will be made before
Jan. 1.

CITY, UNION HEADED TOWARD ARBITRA TION:
Fire fighters nix contract offer

S14TE 1-2-34

231 So. State St
Phone 662-5296
ANN ARBOR

By PATRICIA HAGEN
Ann Arbor fire fighters voted last
night to reject the city's latest contract
offer, meaning the dispute will
probably be resolved by binding ar-
bitration, the president of the
association said.
"There's no question, it's going to
binding arbitration," said Lester
Kobeck, head of the union representing
the city's 113 fire fighters, who have
been working without a contract since
June 30.
THREE-YEAR CONTRACTS for city

police officers and fire fighters expired
June 30 and negotiators have been
meeting since May to write new con-
tracts for both groups. Under state law,
police and fire fighter associations can-
not strike, and negotiations must con-
tinue past the expiration date of the
contract. Negotiators resort to binding
artibration only if talks between the
union and local negotiators are
stalemated.
The fire fighters voted to reject the
proposal because no change was made
in the association's retirement plan,
Kobeck said. Under the contract that
expired this year, Kobeck explained,
fire fighters must retire at 55, but the
association wants its new contract to
include a reduction in the "penalty" for
voluntary early retirement.

..

CREOLE CUISINE IN THE FINEST
NEW ORLEANS TRADITION...
JAMBALAYA, SHRIMP CREOLE, SCAMPI
LOUISIANA, CHICKEN ROCHAMBEAU,
TO NAME JUST A FEW...
e EALUISIANA
RESTAURANT
iii Catherine- St 01 665-.2992 O()i-n 11 i0 amn)to 2a in(.hilt

Kobeck said earlier yesterday
negotiations between the city and the
association went into binding ar-
bitration only once before, five years
ago. If a mediator is called into
negotiations, Kobeck said the
associaiton will ask for a cost of living,
provision in the wage package.
In other developments, Muskovitt
said Wednesday that a contract set6
tlement with the city's 120 police of-
ficers may be reached within "several
days."
"We have a general outline 'of a
possible agreement," said th-
president of the Ann Arbor Police O
ficers Association, Charles Ghent.
NEGOTIATORS MET yesterday and,
more talks are scheduled for, this,-~
weekend to finalize contract languaga
Ghent said the association may be able
to vote to ratify a contract by the end of:
next week. City Council must also app
prove a contract.
The officer's salary package, which j
includes a cost of living provision, ande
work schedules have been the crucial,
issues in the four months of a
negotiations, according to Ghent.
Ghent said the talks to write the,
proposed two year contract currently;
being considered have proceeded
smoother than talks in previous years.l

WHEN INFORMED of the vote, the
negotiator for the city said the city was
not going to change its position on the
retirement issue. Melvin Muskovitz
said a state appointed mediator would
not be able to reach a settlement if the
union will not change its position.
Negotiators met yesterday afternoon.
and -evening before the proposal was
presented at the' regularly scheduled
membership meeting when the vote
was taken.

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-77-

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LIBERTY CENTRE

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