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October 03, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-03

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Page 2-Wednesday, October 3, 1979-The Michigan Daily
SIhen in Leningrad,

OFFICIALS SAY RADIATION LEVELS NOT DANGE ROUS

don't overdo
LENINGRAD, U.S.S.R. (AP) - Russian food and
After an unprecedented number of vodka to 'go native.
American deaths in Leningrad this "And, worse, An
year, U.S. Consulate officials are over-organize t
urging tourists to "take it easy''- something is offer
and not overdo it while traveling in see everything. Th
the U.S.S.R. waste any time. Tb
Seven died, six of them tourists stop and relax. Son
aged 50 to 70 who suffered heart at- literally programm
tacks in Leningrad hotels and By contrast, Mo
restaurants, on airplanes, or even the first stop on U.
waiting for a hydrofoil trip, officials - has reported onl;
sa death so far this yea
THIS PAST summer - when five BECAUSE SOVI
dead, six hospitalized, and two cheap, many U.S. t
medical evacuations were logged - middle-aged men
U.S. diplomats began referring to time and money
Leningrad as "a war zone." Usually their trip
It's not that the U.S. Consulate days in Moscow, a
wants to scare tourists away from Sea, or Central A
Leningrad, whose pre-revolutionary Kiev, and then Leni
palaces and renowned art treasures According to Sov
attract sone 100,000 U.S. visitors a cremation costs $3(
year. The problem seems to be that $800, and to prepari
many Americans overdo it. it back to America
On the large group tours so as $2,400 to $2,900, o
frequent here, Leningrad is often the Of the seven dea4
last stop on a bone-wearying Soviet. five chose to send1
itinerary. -. the United States. A
"MANY TOURISTS try to do too being negotiated. L
much in too short a time," said one buried the body in
consular officer who asked not to be the dead man's U.S
identified. "They over-eat rich returned to Americ,

Nuclear plant leak found in Minnesota

it
drink too much
mericans ,tend to
hemselves. If
ed, they want to
hey don't want to
hey don't want to
netimes, they are
ed to death."
oscow - usually
S. tour schedules
y one U.S. tourist
ar.
ET trips are not
ourists tend to be
and women with
on their hands.
s include a few
visit to the Black
sia, followed by
ngrad.
viet-set prices, a
00, a local burial
e a body and ship
can run as high
fficials say.
d, the families of
the body back to
k sixth case is still
Latvian relatives
Latvia, but now
. family wants it
,a.

(AP) - A steam tube ruptured at the
Prairie Island nuclear generating plant
today, allowing radioactive steam to
escape into the atmosphere for up to 27
minutes, but there was no immediate
danger, an aide to Minnesota Gov. Al
Quie said.
Quie aide Bob Anderson said in St.
Paul that Northern States Power Co.
engineers at the plant near Red Wing
first detected the leak at 2:14 p.m. in
one of two 52-megawatt nuclear
generators at Prairie Island.
Anderson said the generator was shut
down at 2:24 p.m. A general emergency
was declared at the plant at 2:30 p.m.
and plant .personnel were evacuated,
Anderson said.
THE PROBLEM was isolated at 2:41
p.m. and the release of radioactivity

was stopped at that time, Anderson
said.
Anderson said the State Emergency
Services Division and the governor
were informed of the accident at 2:32
p.m.
"It's not dangerous from all that we
can determine from monitoring," said
Quie. "We find no detectable radiation
in the air outside the plant."
TWO TEAMS of state health depar-
tment inspectors were immediately
dispatched to the scene to begin
measuring radioactivity in the air, said
Anderson. A five-member Nuclear
Regulatory Commission team also was
dispatched to the scene by chartered
airplane from Chicago, said an NRC
spokesman.
Anderson said monitoring teams
were measuring radioactivity in the air

at two- and three-mile intervals -rom
the plant site, which is about six miles
northwest of the Red Wing business
district and 28 miles southeast of Min-
neapolis-St. Paul.
First reports from one test taken two
to three miles south-southwest of the
plant indicated no radiation, said An-
derson. "All readings were non-
detectable," he said, "the same as on a
normal day."
R. S. LEDDICK, nuclear projects
manager for NSP, which operates the
Prairie Island plant, said, "It's not a
dangerous situation."
Leddick said a steam tube, one of
hundreds in the steam generator, rup-
tured in Unit One. The rupture allowed
primary radioactive water to pass into
a non-radioactive secondary system,
said Leddick. From the secondary

system, he added, radioactive water
was emitted into the atmosphereas
steam.
Ed Watzl, superintendent of
engineering and radiation protection at
the Prairie Island plant, said the break
was a small one. Watzl told Associated
Press editors last month at their fall
meeting -in Red Wing that recent
procedural changes at the Prairie
Island plant had reduced what he called
the ".already remote likelihood" of -a
nuclear accident at the plant.
"YOU CAN'T be sure an accident will
never happen," said Watzl. But he said
that because of differences in plant
operation and equipment, it was very
unlikely that a nuclear accident such as
that at Three Mile Island in Pens
nsylvania earlier this year would occur
at Prairie Island.

'U, officials skeptical about new Ed. Dept.

0 A 13 A WQ10 A-1

RvQARA ANQYA( H

SPRING 1980
WASHINGTON SEMESTER.
The American University
separate prbgrams in
CRIMINAL JUSTICE " URBAN AFFAIRS
NATIONAL GOVERNMENT " FOREIGN POLICY
ECONQMIC POLICY 9 AMERICAN STUDIES

tsy anA AizAu
Many University administrators say
they have reservations about the newly-
created Department of Education and
fear the agency may lead to more cen-
tralized federal control of education.
The bill, approved by the U.S. House
of Representatives last Thursday,,
places most federal education
programs under a single department.
Proponents of the measure say the new
agency will give education a higher
priority in the federal government.
THE UNIVERSITY and many other
colleges, however, have traditionally
been against a separate department of
education, citing fears of more federal
control, more bureaucracy, and less
community input into education.
University Interim President Alan
Smith said he had written several letters
to Washington against the proposed
department. "I don't think support (for
the University) will be enhanced by the
new Department of Education," he
said. Smith added that he is concerned
federal control may extend into
elementary and secondary schools un-
der the new agency.
Wilbur Cohen, University Education
professor and former secretary of the
Department of Health, Eduction and
Welfare (HEW) said he hopes the new

department won't have an adverse ef-
fect on higher education. He said he is
worried that elementary and secondary
education concerns will dominate the
new department, and hopes higher-
education will be given a "fair break."
WITH EDUCATION removed from
HEW, Cohen said he is concerned the
new department will be dominated by
educators and will lack input from
other areas.
According to University officials, the
person chosen to head the new depar-
tment will be crucial to its success.

Cohen cited the leadership problems of
the Department of Energy-another
department created during President
Carter's term.
If the person selected to head the
agency is "strongly for education," the
department could be advantageous to
higher education, said School of
Education Dean JoansStark. She said
she was in Washington last week when
the House approved the bill and the
mood was "enthusiastic."
BOTH THOSE for and against the

department decided to "work togetfier
and make it work," she said. But Stark
added that, "Federal control. of
education is so great now, that it (the
department) is not going to make much
difference."
U.S. Representative Carl Pursell (R-
Plymouth) voted in favor of the depar-
tment. He said he is "satisfied there is
strong language in the bill to include
local control,"and said he hopes a
separate department will provide bet-
ter visability for scholarship and grAnt
proposals.

programs include:
" SEMINARS WITH DECISION MAKERS'
" INTERNSHIPS ON CAPITAL HILL, IN
GOVERNMENT-AGENCIES, WITH
PUBLIC INTEREST GROUPS

for further information write:
Washington Semester Programs
Ward Circle Bldg. 216
Washington.,D.C. 20016

-WCCAA,
(Continued from Page 1)
mation cited was not included i
court record and consequently4
not be used in the appeal.
DAVIS SAYS his motion to affir
lower court ruling or dismiss the a
is valid because "The questions .
so unsubstantial as to nee
argument. . ." He added that O'
has misrepresented the proceedin
He also said O'Brien's motion i
founded," and was created in or
delay and distract the court.
The University and the WCCAA
court as a result of a decision mad

'U' attorneys fle motions
April by a Washtenaw County Circuit in which the state Supreme Co
n the Court judge. The judge ruled that the ted a similar motion.
could University Board of Regents could But Davis disagreed: "It is
move its meetings and bar protesters in that is seldon made. Maybei
m the the event of a disruption of proceedings. (O'Brien's) inexperience."
ippeal LAST MARCH, the ;WCCAA led a "THE DECISION of the (Wa
.. are disruption of the Regents meeting, County Circuit Court) j
d no demanding that the University sell its correct," Davis said, defew
'Brien stock in firms that conduct business in request to have the case dismis
gs. South Africa. He charges that the appeal
s "ill- O'Brien contends that motions have substantial merit, whil
der to similar to his request for a new claims the appeal raises
statement are not uncommon. In his questions regarding the 1977 s
are in argument he cites another of his cases Meetings Act.

urt gran-
a motion
it due to
ashtenaw
udge.is
nding .his
ssed.-
does not
e O'Brier
serious
tate Open

The American University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University.
INTERNSH IPS In

e last

;-

WASHINGTON
D.C.

LANSING
MI.

Sponsored by Career Planning & Placement
Interested in working in Washington, D.C., or Lons-
ing, Michigan, during summer, 1980? Come find out
how at the University of Michigan's Public Service
Intern Program Mass Meeting. Summer internships
are available in legislative offices, executive offices
and-agencies, the judiciary, lobbying organizations,
and the media. Financial assistance available.

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k ; Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
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Complete Birth Control Clinic
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from no-TA clause

a
ea

1

MASS MEETING
Tuesday)
Undergi
October 9th
Rackham Aud.
7:30 p.m.,
wash ingon. d .m

11 courses exempted

iraduates
Only

I

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3684)
L.TITLE OF PUBLICATION A. PUBLICATIONO._2 DATE OF FILING
The Michigan Daily N 2 OAtE 1FFL79
3.FRE OENCY F ISSUE a A. NO. OF ISSUES PUBLISHED B.ANNUALSBfSCRtPTION
ANNUALLY PRICE
Daily except Vionday, reg. school year. 221 E$18.50
LOCATION OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION (Street, CityCounty, State and ZIPCode) (Not prinIer)
420 laynard, Ann Arbor, RI. 48109

* 3oH~uY *
Required Reading for Staying Healthy 101
You wouldn't tackle Coic without a text, so why take chances
with your health?
Health Service has compiled an easy-to-read one
page guide- "FOR WHAT'S BUGGING YOU".
It lists medical care and Services available, clinics and physi-
cians' phone numbers, and also explains the billing process
here.
You can pick-up your FREE copy
at the Health Service Information Desk
You'll stay way ahead of the competition

By ADRIENNE LYONS
Although LSA graduate.student.
teaching assistants (TAs) will not be
teaching courses above the 300-level
next fall, 11 exceptions to the rule were
approved yesterday by the LSA
Curriculum Committee.
Approval was. granted to four
programming-language courses in
Computer and Communication Scien-
ces; four Hebrew courses; Eand
Linguistics 301 (Elementary Thai) and
303 (Elementary Indonesian).
In addition, English 325 (Inter-
mediate Exposition) was approved,
with the stipulations that suggestions
would be made to the department that
TAs receive stronger faculty super-
vision, and that the committee be kept
informed on the course'sprogress.'
The exemptions were allowed
because they are introductory courses,
with upper-level numbers, according
to committee members.
Last February, the LSA Executive
Committee approved a policy
prohibiting TA-taught courses at the
300-level or above. The policy met with
strong opposition from various groups,
including the Graduate Employees
Organization, which claimed the policy
would interfere with a lawsuit the group
The University's 'radio station
(WUOM) has the most powerful signal
(230,000 watts) of any public-
educational FM station in the nation,
and third most powerful signal of any
FM station.

filed against the University concerning
the employement status of TAs.
Also, many department chairpersons
said they feared they would have to cut
some of their upper-level courses'to
comply with the policy.
Other courses will be considered for
the exemption next week by the
Curriculum Committee.
Daily Official Bulletin
Wednesday, October 3,1979
Daily Calendar
Postgradute Medicine/Health Professions Educa-
tion: Blood Coagulation for Physicians -an
Laboratory Personnel, Towsley, 8a.m.
CRLT: W. J. McKeachie, "Constructing Test,"
2417 Mason Hall, 3:10 p.m.
Environmental Science & Techology: Massoud
Pirbazari, "Scanning Electron Microscopy of
Biological Growth on Granular Absorbents Used in
water and Wastewater Treatment Processes," 136
Eng., 1-A Bldg., 3:30 p.m.
SAME: Robert Merritt, L. H. Greenwald, "Ho
and Why Engineers Find Themselves as Corporato
Managers," 262 North Hall, 4p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: F. Mayer, KMS Fusion
"Laser Fusion Experiments: Progress
Problems," 296 Dennison 4 p.m.
Ind./Oper. Eng.: B. F. Scribner, Bethlehem Stee
Corporation, "Opplan," 229 W. Eng., 4 p.m.
Statistics: Hsiao Ping, "F-Minimas Procedure fo
Selecting Populations Close to a Control," 450 Maso
Hall, 4p.m.
Psychology' Reed Hastie, "Decision Making in
Juries," 3514 Mason, 4 p.m.
English Composition Board: "Alternatives to th
Five-Paragraph Essay," 2402 Mason, 7 p.m.
IAAATDC: Frank Andrews, "Research &
Development Activities and Technological Growth in
Developing Countries," E. Conf. R.m., Rackham,
p.m.
Germanic Languages & Literatures: Max -Kade
"Der Verteidiger hat das wort," 603 Oxford Rd.,
p.m.
Musical Society: New York City Opera Theatre
"Cosi Fan Tutte" (English), Power Center, 8 p.m.
General Notice
PRESIDEN'S STATE OF THE UNIVERSIT
ADDRESS. Interim President Smith will give th
annual State of the University Address to the facult
apd staff in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at 8:00 p.m.
Monday, October 8, 1979. Distinguished facult
awards will be presented during the program. Th
Faculty Womens Club and SACUA will host a rece
,tio on the second floor of the Michigan League im
mediately following the ceremony: All members o
the University community are invited to attend.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(UISPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No.24
Wednesday, October 3, 1979.
is edited and managed by students a
the University of Michigan. Publishe
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornin
during the University year at 4
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michiga
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septe
ber through April (2 semesters);$?3 b
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summe
session published Tuesday throug
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates
$6.50 in Ann-Arbor; $7.00 by mail' out

5. LOCATION OF THE HEAOQUARTERS OR GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICES OF THE PUBLISHERS (Not printers)
420 lanard, Ann Arbor, MI., 48109

6.

NAMES AND COMPLETE ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHER. EDITOR, AND MANAGING EDITOR

PUBLISHER (Name and Adds,)
3oard For Student Publications, 420 Maynard, Ann arbor II. 48109 __
EDITOR (Name and Address)
Susan darner, 120 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, 11I. 48104
MANAGING]EDITOR (Name and Addrew) Julia Rovener, 406.Packard, A Arbor, EI. 48104
Richard 3erke, 721 S. Forest, Ann Arbor EI. 48104
7. OWNE R (If ownIed b) a corporation- its name and address mnust be stated and also immenIdiately t hereunder theniamesI' and addresesf stock
holders owinllg or holdinlg I percent or Mlore of total amount of stock. If not owned byl a corporatilon- the(ines and aI0111ddresses. of thin ,dividual
owners must be given. If owned bya partnership or other unincorporated firma, its name and addres as wellas that of each individual must be
gvn.If the publication is published by a nonlprofit organzationl, its ,nane and address Imust he state'd.)
NAME ADDRESS
3oard For Student Publications 420 -Manard Ann ubores 181. 48109
8. KNOWN BONDHOLDE RS. MORTGAGEES, AND OTHER SECURITY HOLDERS OWNING OR HOLOING 1 PERCENT cR MORE OF
TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONtDS. MORTGAGES OR OTHER SECURITIES (If there are none, so state))
NAME ADDRESS
- 180113- - _-_
9. FOR COMPLETION BY NONPROFIT^ORGANIZATIONS AUTHORIZED TO MAIL AT SPECIAL RATES (Sea n 132.122. PSM)
The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for Federa income tax purposes (Check one)

U

KEITH MOLIN

C HAVE NOT CHANGED DURING HAVE CHANGED DURING
®PRECEDING 12 MONTHS .J PRECEDING 12 MONTHS

(it changed. PubI~lier ,mus subit L's Iantin.I of ehangee
with1 this stateeont.).

10. EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIRCULATION
A. TOTAL NO. COPIES PRINTED (Net Presa Run)
B. PAIO CIRCULATION-
. SALES TNR^UG;H. DEALERS AND CARRIERS. STREET
VENDORS AND COUNTER SALES
2. MAILSUBSCRIPTIONS
C. TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION (Sum of G2 and IOB2)
0. FREE DISTRIBUTION BY MAIL CARRIER OR OTER MEANS
SAMPLES. COMPLIMENTARY, AND OTHER FREE COPIES
E. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Sum ofC and D)
P. COPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED

AVERAGE NO COPIES EACH
IISSUE DURINI3 PRECEDING
12 MONTHS
- 5036
3447
-139
100

ACTUAL NO. COPIES OF SINGLE
ISSUE PUBLISHED NEAREST TO
FILING DATE'
5500
3452
1400

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